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Matt

EMT Class

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For the past month I've been taking an EMT-B class at North Seattle Community College and it's been really empowering and enjoyable. I wanted to give the cc.com climbing community a heads up so that those who are interested might sight up for next semester's class.

 

There are a few hoops you have to jump through before you can enroll in the class, the two biggest being you must get a CPR for the Professional Rescuer card and there is an entrance exam you must pass to get into the class. I think there are generally 120 or so students trying for the 40 seats in the class so you must score in the top 25 percentile.

 

The class is three months long, 110 hours of class time, 6pm to 10pm Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Honestly it's a lot of work, and when combined with a 40 work week it makes getting out and climbing very difficult. I think in the end it will be worth it for both my partners and myself. From a climber's point of view, it's better to take the class when it's wet and rainy outside and you can minimize your missed climbing days.

 

Here's the hyperlink:

 

http://www.northseattle.edu/health/emt/index.htm

 

Here's a list of other EMT programs in Washington:

 

http://www.cityofseattle.net/fire/employment/ffjob_EMT.htm

 

Feel free to email me with any questions you have. I'm planning on cruising over to Leavenworth to join the rope up so I hope to see you all there!

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Even better: you can administer meds. Only "med" a basic can dish out is O2.

 

The EMT-B program at Portland Community College has no entrance requirements. Part of the program is CPR certification.

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You are close. EMT-Bs can administer O2, oral glucose, and activated charcoal. Additionally we can help patients self administer auto-inhalers, epinephrine, and nitroglycerin.

 

If you have a partially obstructed airway we can stick a tube down your throat.

 

At the moment I'm planning on eventually going for my EMT-P, but generally you need to work as an EMT-B for a year before going to paramedic school. I don't think we have EMT-Is in Washington.

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Also if you are interested in mountain rescue, the EMT-B program is actually recognized by the state of Oregon and Washington, while the WFR (a more appropriate and comprehensive certification for mountain rescue in my opinion) is not. So technically it is more useful for the unit rather than the WFR. In fact a standard urban first responder (police officer, some firefighters) has more power at the accident scene from a legal standpoint than a WFR. Such is life when dealing with the state. [Roll Eyes] Personally I would screw the consequences if someone is dying. I'll administer epi for anaphalaxis and sort out the consequences in court.

 

[ 10-18-2002, 11:09 AM: Message edited by: iain ]

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i've been thinking of trying for that emt-b class for some. i already have the cpr cert, but i was wondering what the entrance exam is like. just basic first aid covered by a red cross course, or do you need to really study for it?

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Actually you just need basic first aid to meet the requirements of the OSSA for general state SAR certification. The mountain rescue units in Oregon usually require more advanced training, and endorse WFR, W-EMT, EMT, and Paramedic. Another good certification is the Outdoor Emergency Care program taught by the National Ski Patrol. Paramedics are particularly valuable for a number of reasons both logistically and legally.

 

Most people don't want to dedicate that much time to medical training, and a standard Wilderness First Aid or FR certification is fine if you are going to assist a WFR or EMT. I would not want to rely on WFA alone though, if I was likely to be in charge of an accident scene.

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I think WFR should be standard for mountain rescue. It's just difficult to get enough people to commit the time and sometimes the money (some groups will provide some sponsorship, or often, some members in the unit are WMI/WMA instructors).

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The first aid test is not difficult at all, it based on the red cross first responder book. However high score is not the only requirment to get in at NSCC, they also rank based on affiliation. Also keep in mind that to get your certification at the end you have to be employed with a state affiliated EMS.

The WFR class that I took does an anaphylaxis workshop (we stick each other with saline to practice) although we not legally covered without the guise of a program medical director we can use it under the good samaritin laws and be pretty safe.

 

Matt, EMT-b can only pipe an upper airway obstruction right? I though you had to have an additional airway Tech designation to tube someone.

Over all im pretty happy with what I got out of the WFR class and with the exception of W-EMT it seems the most appropriate to what we all do, especially the additional "wilderness protocols".

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Law Goddess--

 

I think about half the class already had their EMT and let their certification lapse or had taken a First Responder class so you are testing against people with a lot of knowledge. I see my math was bad-- 40 out of 120 is 33%, but whatever, there was a large auditorium of people testing to get in.

 

Personally, I bought the book "Emergency Response: USDOT First Responder Curriculum" published by the American Red Cross and learned enough on my own to pass the entrance exam. I wish I had taken a First Responder class, because it is clear in the practicals who has done this before and who is learning it for the first time.

 

So law goddess, yes, you have to study for the test, both to get into the class and have a base of knowledge to work from once you enroll.

 

It's well worth it.

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I missed the cut at N. community so ended up doing the program at Everett. Its a bit of a drive I know but no entrance restrictions and a comparable program. Seems like a long road getting in with a department and the private company's pay you dirt but the experience alone is worth it.

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quote:

Originally posted by iain:

Another good certification is the Outdoor Emergency Care program taught by the National Ski Patrol.

Plus you get a chance to carve up some sweet turns. [big Drink]

On a serious note, I did ski patrol for about 4 years. The biggest thing it helped me learn was there is a huge difference in providing aid in the classroom v. real world with Cascade Crap(snow mixed with rain) is falling on you and your patient. Huge difference, but once you get used to it, aid can still be rendered. Try this...Setup an accident in your backyard in the middle of the night with these recent colder temps, turn on the sprinkler, then try to apply a bandage to a guys leg that has a crampon puncture wound. Oh yeah, turn off the lights and just use your headlamps. Of course while wearing rubber gloves and all...

[rockband]

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if you could get an HH60 to hover directly overhead to throw in some rotor wash and white noise you've got yourself a scenario [laf]

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quote:

Originally posted by Matt:

You are close. EMT-Bs can administer O2, oral glucose, and activated charcoal. Additionally we can help patients self administer auto-inhalers, epinephrine, and nitroglycerin.

 

If you have a partially obstructed airway we can stick a tube down your throat.

 

At the moment I'm planning on eventually going for my EMT-P, but generally you need to work as an EMT-B for a year before going to paramedic school. I don't think we have EMT-Is in Washington.

Thanks for the reminder Matt. My EMT-B certification lapsed some years ago. Good experience and a fun job but the pay sucks in the private sector.

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quote:

Originally posted by iain:

if you could get an HH60 to hover directly overhead to throw in some rotor wash and white noise you've got yourself a scenario
[laf]

Then when the HH60 goes down and you have to remember where the disconnect switch is for the battery system so you can then start working on those victims... [rockband]

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quote:

Originally posted by rbw1966:

Thanks for the reminder Matt. My EMT-B certification lapsed some years ago. Good experience and a fun job but the pay sucks in the private sector.

I think Paramedics are some of the most underpaid professionals in the country. Whereever there is bad stuff happening in a city that is where you are going, all day. [hell no]

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Depends. I have a buddy who is a paramedic for portland fire and he pulls down more ducats than most lawyers I work with and works less than 10 calls a 24-hour shift. Pretty sweet situation.

 

I will agree that the private sector medics are grossly underpaid--and under-recognized--for their work. As a culture we value the unnecessary positions more than the ones most valuable.

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I have been through the program at NSCC and it is a great program. That said, I am letting my EMTB lapse and am going to get my WFR. I just don't see myself carying a defibrilator or O2 on a climb in the cascades.

 

Still though, I would recomend it to anyone who wants to learn some solid emergency medical skills. It is a great expirence and you will learn alot of stuff at a great price. (Less than my WFR is going to be) [smile]

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quote:

Originally posted by Pencil Pusher:

I would think people in the medical profession's pay is directly related to their education and/or training.

Exponentially so.

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If you want a good wilderness first aid book, check out "Wilderness 911" by Eric A, Weiss, M.D. One of my climbing buddies is actually friends with him. He went on an expedition to Belize as a doctor and met Eric. He also has a "better" book but I haven't gotten it yet.

 

Steve

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quote:

Originally posted by iain:

<snip>In fact a standard urban first responder (police officer, some firefighters) has more power at the accident scene from a legal standpoint than a WFR.

<snip>

Don't most WFR courses meet DOT First Responder standards?

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