Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
SnowByrd

Looking ahead - Next Step

Recommended Posts

Okay...so I have a harness, an AT device, shoes, and a locking carabiner. I've been climbing (sport) once and will ocntinue to climb a couple of times a week. What's the next step for purchasing equipment? I assume that I'll continue to learn to do more difficult climbs but in the process, probably learn to 'clean up' some of the easier ones? After that, possibly learn to lead easier ones as well (down the road a little ways, I mean.) Advice please (like I need to ask tongue.gif )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

other than the rope, i'd hold off for a bit...

 

Probably the single best purchase you can make if you are serious about progressing is a...(flame suit on, because of all of the old crusty types here)...Gym membership...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You got a helmet? That's pretty important. Also, something to use as a personal anchor.

 

Other than that, I presume you'll be climbing with more experienced people for a while and can share all their other gear (rope, draws, pro, etc etc)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have any inclination to follow trad, you will need a cleaning tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, something to use as a personal anchor.

 

The rope should be your personal anchor. I don't understand the many people I see committing only to a daisy as a personal anchor. The rope is fucking bomber, and it is a good habit to get into as you may not have a daisy around all the time (i.e., alpine rock climbing where weight is an issue). I use a daisy at places like Squamish where the anchors are mostly bolts, but I always tie in with the rope to the main anchor point first.

 

My advice would be to decide what type of climbing you want to do (try both sport and trad) and then seek out mentors who will are willing to teach you.

 

Greg_W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay...so I have a harness, an AT device, shoes, and a locking carabiner. I've been climbing (sport) once and will ocntinue to climb a couple of times a week. What's the next step for purchasing equipment? I assume that I'll continue to learn to do more difficult climbs but in the process, probably learn to 'clean up' some of the easier ones? After that, possibly learn to lead easier ones as well (down the road a little ways, I mean.) Advice please (like I need to ask tongue.gif )

 

You should eschew the unnecessary bullshit that you see many climbers with and go straight for the must-have equipment that you will use everywhere from the crag to the alpine: pink bunny slippers, a full-body Ewok suit, a banjo, six-pack of Pacifico w/ limes, and a towel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay...so I have a harness, an AT device, shoes, and a locking carabiner. I've been climbing (sport) once and will ocntinue to climb a couple of times a week. What's the next step for purchasing equipment? I assume that I'll continue to learn to do more difficult climbs but in the process, probably learn to 'clean up' some of the easier ones? After that, possibly learn to lead easier ones as well (down the road a little ways, I mean.) Advice please (like I need to ask tongue.gif )

 

You should eschew the unnecessary bullshit that you see many climbers with and go straight for the must-have equipment that you will use everywhere from the crag to the alpine: pink bunny slippers, a full-body Ewok suit, a banjo, six-pack of Pacifico w/ limes, and a towel.

 

Some sort of bongos, african drums, or a tambourine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, something to use as a personal anchor.

 

The rope should be your personal anchor.

 

Ummm... what about when you're at the top of a sport pitch and you have to untie yourself to feed the rope through the chains? Or any time you're getting ready to rap off of anything, for that matter? What do you anchor yourself with then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, something to use as a personal anchor.

 

The rope should be your personal anchor.

 

Ummm... what about when you're at the top of a sport pitch and you have to untie yourself to feed the rope through the chains? Or any time you're getting ready to rap off of anything, for that matter? What do you anchor yourself with then?

 

Personal anchor = tied double sling.

 

It's cheap and multi-functional. A daisy chain is only useful to clip yourself in when you are waiting to rappel. Beyond that, it's a good possibility that you will have a couple on your rack for climbing, and you won't need them for climbing when you are rapelling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buy your own rope

 

I'm hearing rope...so...next question is, what kind of a rope? Length? Width?

 

Gym membership: got it.

Mentors: got them.

Locking biners: got them. (5 enough?)

Helmet: will buy.

Daisy Chain: What sort? (plan to stick with sport climbing for the short term while I'm learning.)

Quick Draws: again, what sort?

Corona: got it.

 

Corona is better than Pacifico...Pacifico tastes like urine. I hate pink. I'll borrow CascadeClimber's flame retardant suit. moon.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

60 meters long, 9.7mm-10.5mm in length. You could get a dry rope, but it's unnecessary for cragging (unless you like climbing in the rain).

 

Check out reioutlet.com and gearexpress.com for cheap ropes.

 

I don't know about quickdraws. I use my doubled single slings

Edited by fenderfour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, something to use as a personal anchor.

 

The rope should be your personal anchor.

 

Ummm... what about when you're at the top of a sport pitch and you have to untie yourself to feed the rope through the chains? Or any time you're getting ready to rap off of anything, for that matter? What do you anchor yourself with then?

 

Yet another reason not to sport climb. Fenderfour has it right; just use a sling, you're carrying them anyways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like I said, "SOMETHING to use as a personal anchor". I never specifically advocated a daisy. Snowbyrd doesn't have any slings either!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daisy are better than a single sling in my opinion but for the new climber I would advocate spending the extra $$$ and buying a Metolius PAS (personal anchor system) this is a version of the daisy with full strength loops all the way along.

 

Of course you can make a home made daisy with supertape and tie a couple of water knots but these have a higher incidence of tangling on things in my experience and always seem to be the wrong length when you need to use them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What jk said and also like Freedom of the Hills or the John Long instructional book(s) to read for when you want a second opinion on something you saw at the crag or that someone didn't explain well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, something to use as a personal anchor.

 

The rope should be your personal anchor. I don't understand the many people I see committing only to a daisy as a personal anchor. The rope is fucking bomber, and it is a good habit to get into as you may not have a daisy around all the time (i.e., alpine rock climbing where weight is an issue). I use a daisy at places like Squamish where the anchors are mostly bolts, but I always tie in with the rope to the main anchor point first.

 

My advice would be to decide what type of climbing you want to do (try both sport and trad) and then seek out mentors who will are willing to teach you.

 

Greg_W

 

I'm w/ greg on this...tying in w/ rope is way to go...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tying in with rope uses up rope you could be using to stretch out a pitch

 

also it makes it harder to escape the belay under some circumstances

 

finally, for single pitch cragging the only times you need anchors are 1) anchor belayer to the ground or 2) when threading rope for rappel at top of pitch. in both of these circumstances daisy or sling is better anchor than using rope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She's a newbie, dude. The situations you mention are a little down the road for her. Got's to start with the fundamentals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

daisy chains rock, tying in with the rope sucks. thats fundamental. boxing_smiley.gif

 

not that it matters but evidence of the diversity of opinion on this subject, while possibly confusing, can only be of ultimate benefit for the newbies reading this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simplify. Free-solo naked. Many of us started this way. My first rock climbing experience was at an alpine lake. We stripped to swim and then decided to jump off a cliff. We climbed too high and didn't want to reverse the moves so we climbed to the top and hiked back around. Had some nasty mosquito bites.

Otherwise, just buy some super tape or sewn blue water slings and a couple biners. Make a quick-draw to use as an anchor. Also, If YOU are going to be the one threading the rope through the anchors, be sure to pull up a few meters and tie a loop to clip to yourself so you don't drop the rope. That's much more ambarassing than being discovered climbing naked by a large froup of mounties. Especially if they have to rescue you. We will shun you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×