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catbirdseat

Devastating Fatigue

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There was something I remembered from Touching the Void where Simon, I believe, mentioned how frequently their hard alpine climbs would leave them essentially laid up for a week afterwards. I've heard the term "devastated" applied before. I've never quite gone this far, the worst was being sore for three days after North Ridge of Baker in a day. It would seem that ideally one should avoid getting this fatigued on a climb through preparation. I was wondering about ways to recover as quickly as possible after really hard outings.

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It would seem that ideally one should avoid getting this fatigued on a climb through preparation.

 

rolleyes.gif Im certain after your next epic you will manage to avoid this effectand send some rad shit the next day because of your superior preparation, like Preparation H... smirk.gif

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atkins is sOOO 2003.

 

all the cool people are on the South Beach diet now.

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I was wondering about ways to recover as quickly as possible after really hard outings.

 

Read "Optimum Muscle Performance and Recovery" Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition, Edmund R. Burke, PhD.

 

Everything you need to know. Used copies for around $12 on Amazon.

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If you're into the all natural thing try Arnica montana, it's an extract of the plant. Works good on serious muscle fatigue. I used it after long marathon training runs and it worked damn well for me. It's not suggested that you take it internally, however I did (according to the directions on the tincture I bought). It's most often used as an external rub. I can't say how effective it is in that form.

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Lots of water & goo during and later, water, advil, light workouts and message. If it is hard for you, you will be sore.

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For a number of years I've had good results from a combination of Twinlab Ultra Fuel recovery drink,and Branched Chain Amino supplements,both before and after climbing,bc skiing,etc.

 

I've also rediscovered for myself the value of getting out of the gym for conditioning,doing as much as possible to replicate the conditions you'll be dealing with on the real thing-in other words,the best conditioning for climbing,is climbing.IMHO.

 

wave.gif

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even if you are shit-hot and in perfect shape and acclimitisation you are gonna suffer after a big climb.

 

say, for instance, Bachar and Croft after the first link up of El Cap and Half Dome in a day. ya think they went out the day after and cranked off a couple 5.12 free solos, or did they spend the day in the deli siloing cinnamon buns? do you think any magic powder or drink would have had them out soloing 12s? no? hmmmm

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Well,yeah,of course not.No.I'm not saying that all; my experience has simply been that instead of being wiped out for several days or a week,that muscle soreness/stiffness and general fatigue seem to be much reduced and much less long-lasting.How much is dependent on how strenuous the climb was,particularly duration as well as the intensity of total effort expended.

 

Recovery drinks and supplements aren't magic powders;but they are concentrated amounts of electrolytes,aminos,complex carbs,etc.,that can make a definite difference,especially when you don't wait too long to use them once your effort is done.These things are simply the basics that the muscles need for recovery.Muscle tissue will take in these substances from whatever you ingest;doing it in the form of specific supplements simply hastens and enhances the process.Ideally,the muscles are in the optimum mode for uptake of glycogen for about about an hour after you stop your exertion.Eating or drinking the right things,in the right amount,within that time window, is simply going to give you the best recovery rate,very simple.It's certainly not going to perform miracles if you've just done the El Cap-Half Dome linkup or anything else of that level.But it will definitely shorten your recovery,and will sure as hell do you more good than plain water,donuts,beer,or nothing at all.

 

I'm simply going on personal experience.Give it a try,see what you think before making a judgement.

-----------------------------------------------------

"Better Living Through Chemistry"

 

mushsmile.gifgrin.gif

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ya my point is not that stuff wont help you recover but that cbs seems to think that after a massive ED+ climb that you should be fine if you prepare cause he was only sore for 3 days after cranking off an AD wazzup.gif

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ya my point is not that stuff wont help you recover but that cbs seems to think that after a massive ED+ climb that you should be fine if you prepare cause he was only sore for 3 days after cranking off an AD wazzup.gif
I'm not saying that, Dru. Preparation can reduce the damage, but there are certain trips you can't prepare enough for, right? You just have to go for it.

 

I think what you do immediately after the big climb can have a big effect on your recovery. For example on the drive home, don't just get in the car and sit for hours. I will make any sort of excuse to get the driver to stop for beers or the rest area just so I can stretch my legs.

 

Some guys, particularly the married ones, are in such a damn hurry to get home after a climb and don't want to stop at all. I think the stop for beers is an integral part of the climbing. Nothing like beer for recovery. bigdrink.gif Maybe its the walking back and forth from the bar to the toilet that helps prevent soreness. cantfocus.gif

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Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is what you're referring to. The exact cause of DOMS is unknown (though it probably stems from damaged muscle membranes), but it can be prevented, or at least lessened by: 1) avoiding dramatic changes in training intensity or quantity, 2) maintaining muscle flexibility, and 3) incorporating some "eccentric" workouts into your training schedule. "Eccentric" refers to a contracting of the muscle while it's being stretched. Examples of eccentric training include running downhill and various hopping exercises (one leg hop, two leg hop, skipping, etc.) --basically, plyometric exercise. It's thought that the proactive benefit comes from muscle recruitment rather than any increased fiber strength.

 

Post exercise consumption of high glycemic index foods along with proteins will help as will drinking plenty of fluids (but not alcohol despite all traditions to the contrary). Post exercise ibuprofen will help decrease the perception of soreness, but taking it before won't, and it won't speed recovery. Mild stretching and exercise do speed recovery.

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Don't forget the effect that excess adrenaline can have as well -- after any tough climb that is either really sketchy, exposed, or otherwise leaves you on edge for many hours, your nervous system (in addition to the musculoskeletal system) is going to be shot and will require anywhere from 2-5 days of "active recovery" that is not the specific sport you were engaged in to cause the adrenaline boost.

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