Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
dalius

Numb Toe

Recommended Posts

The left half of my right big toe is completely numb. It's been getting worse and worse over the past few weeks, and I can't figure out what's going on. All I can think if is that my feet got pretty cold on two recent mountaineering trips, but no frostbite as far as I can tell. Can cold injure deep tissue without harming the skin?

 

Also, I've done some longer routes in pretty tight climbing shoes, and my toes have been in some serious pain from not unlacing them at belays all the time. Maybe this could be it?

 

I'm wondering the feeling will come back at some point. Anyone else have some numb toes due to cold or tight rock shoes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years ago I worked in a metal building with a concrete floor. The boss wouldn’t turn on the heat in the winter because he was a cheap fucker. My feet were numb all the time, even when I was home, until I bought some Sorrel – 40 degree below boots. After I left that shit-hole and got back in the world my feet recovered. So I’d say it’s a combo of the cold (although probably not frostbite) and the tight shoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm wondering the feeling will come back at some point.

 

not if you keep getting them cold or cramming them into tight shoes.

 

There have been previous threads on this topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yea yea. takes a couple months. dont wear tight fucking shoes specialy in the cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same problem with both toes (left side of right toe, and right side of left toe). They both were permanantly number for months. Once I started loosening up my climbing shoes at belays the problem fixed itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yelrotflmao.gif I already tried that one, to no avail.

 

fern said:

There have been previous threads on this topic.

I looked, but didn't find any.

 

I guess time as well as loosening shoes at belays and such such heal it. It's totally annoying now, just this numb yet painful feeling. What I really need is time spent sipping cocktails on some tropical beach. That should heal it right up wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Szyjakowski said:

just cut the damn thing off and there will be no more problems...

sthu clown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is getting worse, I would go see a doctor without delay.

 

One possible cause of your problem is trenchfoot. If you've had cold feet on a couple of recent mountaineering trips, it is a good bet that they were cold and wet - and if you keep your feet cold and wet for a couple days at a time you can get injured without actually getting frostbite. It usually heals on its own, I think, but it can lead to infection and loss of tissue.

 

Numbness is not a good sign. If you see any signs of redness, especially if accompanied with swelling, go see a doctor. If you see it rapidly expanding or starting to show streaks up your foot, go to the emergency room. I once had a blister get infected and went to the hospital when it "flared up" and they told me I was probably within hours of having it get so bad I might have lost the toe or even a large part of my foot.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should have been at the doctor 2 weeks ago if you have insurance. It's one thing for something to hurt for weeks and get worse but when you loose feeling that is not good, usually a sign of nerve damage.

 

The thing about toes is they don't get better unless they are immobilized. I've had pretty bad turf toe from climbing and soccer and it takes FOREVER to heal. I've also had pretty sore big toes from cramming my feet into my climbing shoes and it takes months for them to feel better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the input.

 

Szyjacowski, should I really try to cut it off? Will it really work?

 

Good suggestion on the trenchfoot, though I don't think so 'cuz my feet were only really really wet for less than a day. I've had them much wetter and nastier than that before. There's no sign of any discoloration or swelling or anything. Just numbness and dull pain. I think that I just seriously crushed some nerves and they're going to take some time to heal back.

 

It has gotten worse, but not on it's own. It gets worse with every climbing trip I go on, but not between climbing trips. I'd go see a doctor, but have no health insurance, so it's not even an option unless things happen to turn really bad! Ah, the joys of self-employment!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always associated trenchfoot with being out more than a day or two, and not necessarily having your feet ever get "very wet" but merely wearing wet boots and walking in snow for at least a few days in a row and failing to put on completely dry socks when you hit the sack at night. However, I found this by running "trenchfoot" on Google:

 

Trenchfoot is a very serious nonfreezing cold injury which develops when skin of the feet is exposed to moisture and cold for prolonged periods (12 hours or longer). The combination of cold and moisture softens skin, causing tissue loss and, often, infection. Untreated, trenchfoot can eventually require amputation. Often, the first sign of trenchfoot is itching, numbness, or tingling pain. Later the feet may appear swollen, and the skin mildly red, blue, or black. Commonly, trenchfoot shows a distinct "water-line" coinciding with the water level in the boot. Red or bluish blotches appear on the skin, sometimes with open weeping or bleeding. The risk of this potentially crippling injury is high during wet weather or when troops are deployed in wet areas. Soldiers wearing rubberized or tight-fitting boots are at risk for trenchfoot regardless of weather conditions, since sweat accumulates inside these boots and keeps the feet wet.

( U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine )

 

Also, I will add that my own emergency room situation occurred when I had a blister that didn't fully heal before I went climbing and stuffed my foot into a tight boot for a day of climbing in warm weather. So be careful, soldier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dalius said:

should I really try to cut it off? Will it really work?

 

It has gotten worse, but not on it's own.

cut it off man...

seriously, I had the same experience one summer.

it is probably your boots. get new ones or use running shoes....

bigdrink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I just decided to cut the damn thing off. This way it won't be much of a hassle anymore. Check it out!! LINK Anyone need an amputated toe? Should I bring it to Trask's Barbeque? hellno3d.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dalius said:

Well, I just decided to cut the damn thing off. This way it won't be much of a hassle anymore. Check it out!! LINK Anyone need an amputated toe? Should I bring it to Trask's Barbeque? hellno3d.gif

hellno3d.giflabai blogai! blogas lietuvis! yellaf.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a saloon in the Yukon what could use your toe

Do a google search for Sour Toe Cocktail

 

And to think I read this thread to see if Numb Toe was like Camel Toe tongue.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×