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Found 22 results

  1. review Osprey Aether 85 Gear Review

    Gear Review - Osprey Aether 85 Intro: When it comes to packs, you want something comfortable. It needs to be well made, rugged and have useful features. I’ve owned the Osprey Aether 85 for some time now and wouldn’t change it for anything else. Here is my break down review of the pack: Comfort: - I find it to be extremely comfortable even when its full to the brim tipping 60lbs. At 40lb I can hardly tell I have it on, it does an extremely good job of distributing the weight on my hips and shoulders. At the end of a long day I don’t get that soreness on my shoulders that I’ve gotten with other packs. It has plenty of adjustments to make sure you get the perfect fit. Quality: - The quality of the pack is great. Overall the stitching on the seams is good and the zippers function flawlessly even when the pack is stuffed, it is easy to open and close. Where you can really tell the quality is on the shoulder straps, waist straps and back padding. The straps are well padded and thick as to not dig into your skin while carrying heavy loads. Also the back padding has webbing and allows for great breathability so you’re not building up a ton of sweat in your back. Features: - Mountaineering packs shouldn’t have too many pockets or compartments but it should have the right ones. The Osprey Aether, has very convenient features that make for a very practical pack. (1) The zippered pockets on the waist straps allow for storing any thing from lip balm to sunscreen or a Go Pro camera. It allows for quick reach of items that you may need frequently with out having to take of the pack. (2) It also has secure loops on each side of the pack to store 2 ice axes or tools in a safe way where it wont poke you or anyone around you. (3) The straps at the bottom of the pack let you strap in your sleeping pad nice and tight. (4) It has a water bottle holder on each side for quick access. (5) The top is a removable 15L summit pack, once you remove it from the main body it has two straps that allow you to throw it over your shoulder or even wear it like a fanny pack! (6) Lastly the front of the pack has a mesh layer that can be used to store anything you wouldn’t want to get mixed in with the rest of your gear…like…poop bags. (There are more features to the pack but for me these are the most important.) Ruggedness: - If this pack lacks in anything, its in the fact that its not waterproof. If you are typically climbing in snow, you have to be careful how you lay it down or your gear will end up damp. Other than that, it is build like a tank in every other aspect. Mines has been thrown on rocks, dirt, gravel, snow and glacier and its still good as new. No rips or tears anywhere. Final thoughts: - This pack earns 5 stars in my book. I consider its built very solid and useful for anything from back packing to mountaineering. Its large enough to hold enough gear for multiday expeditions and very compactable for short trips. Its adjustability makes it suitable for heavy loads and comfort that last for hours on end. Whether its scrambling up rocks or slogging up a snow field this pack will perform great. Its worth every penny! You can't read more articles on my blog www.brandonclimbs.com
  2. This is my blog with daily pictures from the mountains in Middle East. http://nematisweet.blogsky.com/
  3. Trip: Mt Shasta - Casaval Ridge Trip Date: 03/03/2018 Trip Report: Mt. Shasta Via Casaval Ridge Mt Shasta Facts: Its the second highest peak in the Cascades next to Rainier(No.1) Over 15,000 summit attempts are made every year with only a third being successful. Most of the climbing is done via the popular Avalanche Gulch Casaval ridge has an elevation gain of approx 7,300' Lessons Learned Shorty after arriving from my Rainier trip I was eager to redeem myself on another mountain. Although I had summited, the ass kicking I received really humbled me and opened my eyes to all the areas I needed to improve on for my next going. After much searching I came across Mt Shasta and instantly knew this one would be next. I booked a winter trip via Casaval ridge, I prefer going on the less popular routes to avoid the crowds. This time around I convinced my good friend Yen to join me which made me that much more excited knowing one of my good buddies was joining me for the adventure. The lead up to this climb was especially difficult and there where times when I considered cancelling the trip, I had lost my grandfather to cancer a month after booking the trip and two months before the climb my younger cousin died of an opioid overdose (Please see passion & purpose for more on this and how I’m using my climbs to raise awareness on opioid addiction). These where very difficult times for me personally and made my summit all the more emotional. Training Things where much different this time around. I gave my self considerable amounts of time to train (7 months) and I took my training much more seriously. I trained hard and frequent. I ran 4-5 times a week 5 miles/day on average and did lots of leg work outs, especially exercises that would target my hamstrings and tibialis (down hill muscles). I got on a strict stretching regimen to make sure I had no tightness on my muscles and the best possible range of motion. A good diet got me much leaner and faster for this trip. I had learned my lesson and I wasn't about to commit the same mistakes that nearly prevented me from getting to the summit on Rainier. Mt Shasta California After 7 long months, February finally came around and I was all packed up and ready to go. I flew to San Francisco, spent a few days getting to know the the beautiful city before renting a car and heading up north. On route to Shasta we where able to enjoy the amazing ride, taking in all the scenery that surrounded us completely topped in fresh snow. We got to Shasta in the midst of some crappy weather, it was all cloudy and the visibility sucked. So we opted to head to a local restaurant to have one last solid meal before heading up for the climb the next day! We had pasta, steak and potatoes, it was a feast! We where making sure our bellies where completely satisfied before the big day. We where so stuffed we can hardly walk but when we stepped outside, the weather had cleared and Mt. Shasta's massive presence was towering over us in the most incredible of ways. It really was a sight to be seen. At that very moment I knew we where in for a treat! The Climb The next morning we all met at the SWS office and introduced ourselves. This time around I was one of the few that had some past mountaineering experience. Despite all my training I was still a bit weary and intimidated by the mountain. To my surprise the guides let us know that due to the bad weather conditions, no group from SWS had reached the summit this winter. But luckly we had a very narrow window where we might be the first to make it up(fingers crossed). After a quick pow wow, gear check and poop bag course (poop bags vary from mountain to mountain, not all poop bags are created equal!), we loaded up our packs and headed for the bunny flats. Upon arrival we quickly realized the snow was soft and deep thanks to a heavy fall the days before. We straped on our snow shoes and began breaking trail. The weather was nice and cool and the mountain was as if you where looking at a Virtual reality post card, it was perfect. We slowly started making our way up to what would be our camp for the next two days. It was a very pleasant day on the mountain and I was feeling great, absolutely no exhaustion or leg pumps. Every hour or so we would stop for a break and a chance to take in the breath taking view's. The last 90 minutes consisted of ascending a fairly steep snow field and before we knew it we had arrived at this ledge that would be our camp for the next 2 days. Everyone dropped their pack, pulled out the shovels and automatically started digging out the tent platform. We dug about 3’ in the deepest section and where able to get some nice cozy spots for the tents where they would be protected from the wind. As the sun came down, the temperature started dropping quickly and in a blink of an eye it got very very cold. Even with my mitts on, my fingers were so cold they hurt. I figured it was a good idea to get warm so I quickly tucked my self into my sleeping bag and "tried"( hardly a truth when mountaineering) to get a good night’s sleep. This proved very difficult due to the winds pounding on the tent all night long. It was also Yen's first time on a mountain so he was so excited he wasn’t having any sleep either. What seemed like 15 min after I was finally able close my eyes, the guides where shinning their head lamps on our tents to wake us up. Summit Day It was 2 am, extremely cold and it took some serious will power to get moving. We drank hot coco, got our gear on and set out to conquer the summit. It was dark out and windy while we roped up and started on the ridge. The wind was picking up the snow and spraying it on my face making for some nice frozen snot. We kept moving along waiting for the sun to rise and warm us up a bit. Eventually It did and we got the most incredible views with Mt Shasta’s shadow casted upon the surrounding landscape. We where also able to get a good view of the ridge we where climbing. It was amazing, full of these huge red rocks protruding from the snow forming whats really the most aesthtic line on the mountain. We where roped up in two groups of four. By sunrise our group was moving at a considerably slower pace than the other, so we started to worry we wouldn’t make it to the top on time. We had been at it for nearly 6 hours and had yet to make it to Shastina (Shasta’s little sister at 12,335’) and we still had 2000’ of elevation gain to go before making the summit. I was feeling great, my training had proven to work and I was ready to pick up the pace at any moment to race for the top. The problem was my group members where having a hard time keeping pace and where giving in to exhaustion. By just focusing on putting one foot in front of the other for few hours, we eventually made it to the famous misery hill. By now I could see the first group already making it to the top of the hill. Matt, our group guide sat us down for a second to let us know that our summiting window was closing. We had a choice, either call it a day and start making our way down or haul ass to the top, each one at his best pace and one of us summits on time. At this point we un-roped and he let us know that we had 45 minutes to drop onto misery hill and make it to the top (this is where my training really kicked in). After all the events that happened leading up to this trip and how emotional it was for me, I had to summit on way or another. So I kicked it into high gear and started working my way down onto misery hill on my own and then raced up to the top at a frantic pace. I was able to catch up with the first group just at the beginning of the summit plateau. I felt some guilt leaving my partner to climb up at a slower pace knowing he probably wont make it but knowing he was safe and accompanied by the guide, I decided to push on since this climb meant too much to me. Once I met with the other group, I got a quick drink of water before setting out for the summit pyramid. It was gorgeous once at the plateau, you really get to see how massive of a mountain Shasta really is. Then it’s a short hike before getting to the true summit. We had made it!. We took some pictures, signed the summit log and hung out for a bit before heading back down to camp. Just as I started making my way off the summit I saw Yen, my climbing partner approaching the top. I raced down to where he was and took the final steps with him. I was ecstatic he had made it and that we where able to get a summit picture together. The descent At this time we really had to start heading down in order to make it to camp before sun down. We descended down the side of Avalanche Gulch in a long and boring slog in knee deep snow. It took about 4 hours to get back down. Once at camp I took off my boots, organized my gear inside the tent and went straight to sleep. After a long day, when I finally laid down on my sleeping bag I was so tired I it felt like I was laying on a temperpedic and In a matter os minutes i was out cold. The next morning, we where up around 7 and quickly began packing up since a storm was working its way onto the mountain. We wanted to be out as soon as possible. After a quite uneventful descent we had finally made it back to Bunny Flats. Spirits where high and we where all eager to have a decent meal and get some rest. After thoughts All in all even though my physical conditioning was a lot better on Shasta, I still consider Rainier to be much harder both physically and technically. That being said, this is a beautiful mountain with amazing features. I really enjoyed climbing it in the winter since there wasn't any one else on the mountain at the time. Despite the sun beating down on us the whole summit day, it was still cool enough to where we didn't feel fatigued by the sun. I definitely wouldn't mind coming back and climbing it again, maybe try ski mountaineering it instead! HERES A LIST OF THE GEAR I USED, THE PLACES I STAYED AND THE COST BREAK DOWN OF THE TRIP: Logistics: Shasta is pretty much far from everything, you don't have many options other than renting a car. Plus the drive is well worth it (amazing scenery). Your nearest air port is Sacramento which is about a 3 hour drive. Once at shasta, your best bet is to stay at the SWS bunk house. There are plenty of restaurant in the area to satisfy your pre climb cravings. From the SWS bunk house, its about a 30 min drive to Bunny Flats, where you will begin your climb. Cost break down: SWS mountain guides - $825.00 (+ guide tip) Car rental - $235.00 Hotel - $166.00 (2 nights) Pre climb food - $74.00 Snow Shoe Rentals - $40.00 Total: Approx $1340.00 Gear List: Lower Body- La Sportiva Baruntse Point 6 Medium weight Socks Point 6 Heavy weight socks Smart Wool base layer Mountain Hardware ChockStone pants Arc'teryx Alpha SL Pant Upper Body- Bight Gear Solstice Hoody Men's (base layer) North face Soft shell hooded Jacket (**Highly Recomended) Mountain Hardware ghost lite jacket Mountain Hardwear Micro Dome (insulating warm hat) Marmot Men's Windstopper Glove (light weight) Marmot Men's Randonnee Glove (medium weight) Marmot Mens Mit Climbing Gear- Julbo Monte Bianco Glacier Glasses Black Diamond Climbing Helmet Black Diamond Couloir Harness Black Diamond Raven Pro Ice Axe Black Diamond Sabertooth Clip Crampons Osprey 85 Pack Mountain Hardware 3 degrees sleeping bag MSR Snow Shoes Find out more on my website: www.brandonclimbs.com All climbs are used to raise awareness for the opioid epidemic that is weeping our nation. Gear Notes: On report Approach Notes: On report
  4. This is my website where I post my trip reports, gear review and other adventurous post. I am partnered with a Non profit - The HERO Organization, to raise awareness for the opioid epidemic. 100% of the donations go to HERO. www.brandonclimbs.com
  5. I bought these boots a while back and put about 3 or 4 days of climbing into them. Unfortunately they were a bit too small so I ended up getting a larger size that fit better. These would be a great boot and a good price to the right home. Scarpa Phantom 6000 Size 42
  6. Wondering if anyone is selling a 55 CM Adze. Please let me know. Thank you!
  7. for sale LF Petzl Sum'Tec Adze 55 CM

    Wondering if anyone is selling a 55 CM Adze. Please let me know. Thank you!
  8. Hi all-- I am planning a winter ascent up Mt. Hood with a group of friends and need some advice! We all have some experience with travel on glaciated terrain, ice field whiteout navigation, crevasse rescue, and rope travel etc. in Alaska. We want to practice our mountaineering skills. Also if you have any favorite Mt. Hood backcountry ski spots, I would love to hear about those as well! What route recommendations do you have? How much of the route can I skin up? What is the best month to practice these skills on Mt. Hood? What are other considerations you think are important? Thanks!
  9. Hi everyone, My name is Evan and I am looking for a climbing partner and/or mentor for mountaineering and rock climbing. I have basic glacier travel skills through two guided trips with Kaf Adventures last year. I also have all the basic gear required for a 2-3 day mountaineering trip and gear for sport climbing. I have done the Easton route on Baker last summer and have been training for a Rainer attempt this year. I only recently moved to the Seattle area (Kirkland) and would love to find a partner or two to climb with.
  10. Looking for a Mentor!

    My name is Kiira and I am 20! I am a student at University of Puget Sound and I am looking for a mountaineering/alpine mentor. I'm originally from Colorado and have done a number of the fourteeners as well as a 45 day mountaineering expedition in Patagonia on the southern ice field. I just got off of Denali and I am more motivated then ever to improve my technical skills and get out as much as possible! Let me know if anyone would want to take me under their wing and show me the ropes!
  11. These are brand new, never worn or used, still have the tags on them! Excellent condition, have been stored inside. Purchased these for some climbs that ended up not happening, now they are yours for a great deal! Looking to get $400 obo. Local to Seattle, if you need shipping, $425. Accept venmo or paypal. The Spantik is a double boot designed for cold, high altitudes environments. This step-in crampon-compatible boot excels on steep terrain without sacrificing walkability. The thermo-molded inner boot and one-handed closure system provide insulation and convenient lacing.
  12. Scarpa Charmoz boots, size 42.5, very little use, excellent-perfect condition, $125 Scarpa Triolet boots, size 42.5, moderate use, vibram soles are in very good condition, $90 Please call 206-595-6471. Will provide pics on request. Thanks!
  13. for sale Baruntse 44.5 For Sale

    Hello! I just got back from Denali and would like to sell my Baruntse Boots! Besides some normal crampon wear they are in great condition! Let me know if you are interested. I bought them from Amazon full price so 688 with tax. I am trying to sell them for 550 cause they are still pretty new. I used them a total of 16 days on Denali. Warm Boot! Send me a message! email me for faster communication: dchrmy253@gmail.com
  14. If you are looking at this, you know how amazing CiloGear packs are and this is their winner of the Guides Choice Award. This has an amazing amount of versatility in terms of expansion and compression. This can be used as a single pack for climbs and that isn't just copy. It expands to 40l with the collar extended and down to 15l compressed. I can carry everything in this to base camp and then cinch down the sides for summit day. This version is the burly Guide Service edition which adds super burly VX100 and VX42 for hyper abrasion resistance. You can see from the pictures, this is in near mint condition. Aside from the best pack for spring/summer mountaineering, you don't have to wait the 6-10 weeks for Cilo to make it for you! In short, this pack is amazing. I have three other Cilo packs and am only selling this to downsize a little. I'm in Seattle $175/obo (plus shipping if I can't find someone local)
  15. I am selling a pair of Nepal EVO's, size 46.5. They have been used only three times. Great boots, still in great shape and have years of life left. I am only selling because they are a half size too small for me. Asking $325, PayPal preferred. Buyer pays shipping or local pickup in the Tacoma/Seattle area.
  16. Purchased these I believe in 2012 and wore them once to find out they were a half size too small. Instead of returning/re-selling them I gave myself the impression that I would use them again. Fast forward now and selling them as good as new. Size 44.5 or US 11. Original Retail was $410. Here is a write-up I found online: This toasty warm technical mixed climbing boot sports an integrated gaiter and a Primaloft® lining. The Trango Prime has a thicker EVA layer underfoot and a more general mountaineering geared Vibram® Impact Brake System™ sole.This gives you more traction and cushion on more variable terrain in the mountains than the Trango Extreme EVO Light. Perfect for terrain that requires longer approaches but still requires an extremely technical mixed climbing boot. IDEAL TERRAIN: technical mixed climbing, ice climbing. LAST: Trango UPPER: Water repellant Schoeller®-Keprotech®/ Flex Tec 2/ Water-repellant Lorica® with Antiacqua™ external coating/ Vibram® rubber rand/ Schoeller®-Dynamic™ gaiter LINING: Primaloft®/ Waterproof barrier INSOLE: 9mm insulating Ibi-Thermo MIDSOLE: 6-7mm TPU/ Dual-density Micropore EVA SOLE: Vibram® Impact Brake System™ COLOR: Yellow/Black
  17. Mountaineering Partner

    Hi! I am 19, F, and a student of University of Puget Sound looking for a climbing partner. I have glacier experience and necessary gear, I am in training for big mountain expeditions and need someone to go out with me! I am motivated, hard working, and eager to learn new skills! I am looking to get on Rainier this spring and would love to explore other mountain ranges out here! Contact me if interested!
  18. WA Climbing

    Hey all- I will be in WA during the first/second week of March. I'd love to do some climbing for a few days before heading up to ski in BC. Give me a shout if your are available/interested; happy to discuss more details over email, text or phone. Thanks!
  19. I am planning to be in Washington for few weeks during Mid Spring Season of 2018. I am interested to attempt - Mt. Baker, Mt. Rainier and other Possible peaks around the area. Looking for partner to climb with. Regards TG 414-870-0032
  20. Hello! I am looking to buy Olympus Mons or baturas size 45 for Denali. I am looking at Brand new ones to buy obviously but looking for options. If I buy these I will use them for future climbs as I have sights set on bigger peaks so they will be put to good use. Let me know if you have any available. Best way to get in touch is email dchrmy253@gmail.com Thank you!
  21. for sale MSR Coyote Snow Picket (2)

    Two 24 inch snow pickets, used once, but have been carried to the top of Rainier, Baker, Hood, and Shasta. I live in Colorado now so these aren't getting used as they should. $35 PayPal Friends and Family for both shipped to the lower 48 or buyer pays extra fees.
  22. Size small. These were only worn once and are too small for me. No rips or stains or smells. These pants are in perfect condition. They are perfect for snow shoeing, skiing or any other winter activity. They're also backed by a lifetime warranty. If you rip them for any reason outdoor research will replace them for free. 140.00
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