Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Today
  3. Looks like a scab is afoot
  4. Mountaineering Ropes

    This reminds me of the guy who wrote that Petzl Aztars can only climb WI 3, when my partners and I were climbing WI-5 with completely straight shafted tools 25 years ago. Similarly, I have to disagree with the notion that 50 meter ropes are worthless in the alpine. When I started climbing 50 meter ropes were all you could buy. When 60 meter ropes came out, I jumped on board. 60 meters is still my go to length for cragging. For alpine climbing I went back to 50 meter ropes and I know a number of very strong, experienced guides and climbers who have done the same. Steve House and Vince Anderson climbed AND DESCENDED the Rupal Face with one 50 meter half rope and one 55 meter, 5.5mm tag line. A 50 meter 8-9 mm rope will be a very versatile rope for glaciers as well as for alpine climbing, ice climbing, alpine rock climbing when used with a second rope. Compare ropes using the weight in grams/meter rather than by diameter. Rope manufacturers fudge the advertised diameter by 0.2 mm (that 9.8 mm rope may actually be 10 mm), but cannot fudge the weight. Also, a really thin rope may seem like a great way to save weight, but don't go too thin or it will be harder to ascend and haul on.
  5. Mountaineering Ropes

    I use one an 8.2mm dry rope for all my glacier travel. 60m long. It is 60m as it is part of my double ropes for alpine climbing. It weighs 5.5 lbs. I could chop it to 40 meters and save 2 pounds, but then I would need to buy another rope for my doubles. I don't mind the 60 as that lets me put 3-4 people on the rope with some room on the ends. When I go with just one person, each of us has enough coils to perform a rescue. Remember that for a two-man team, each person needs coils that are just longer than the span between them to be able to drop the other end down. You will see a lot of two-man, and three-man teams tied into the ends of a short rope but that gives them nothing extra for rescue. 50m would be long enough for a 2-3 man as well. 50m is almost worthless rock climbing or in the alpine though as most routes are 60. Your 50m rope would be dedicated only to glacier, while a 60 can do both. Also, if you get into where you cross glaciers then onto rock, a thin rope can be folded over and then used as a double for the rock climb if the pitches are short or you are simulclimbing.
  6. why did you go around via sharkfin instead of heading up to the base of the west ridge of forbidden and then drop down? Been a long time since i was there but that was the way back then. maybe things have changed since? It was one or two long raps from west ridge saddle to snow field. maybe that snow is gone.
  7. Yesterday
  8. It was a truck not a van. They said they were investigating, but not "as a crime". Just investigating. It was "Jesse James" (Internet pseudonym). He lived in his truck. He either fell asleep with a candle or a joint burning, set his mattress on fire inside his truck, and burned himself to death. That's the simplest explanation. Why isn't the case closed? He had deliberately destroyed all his ID. No one really knows what his real name was. There are no dental records on file. Skipping out on a debt or criminal charges elsewhere, who knows? But until they find out who he really was in his previous life, they can't prove that the body was him, just a "John Doe". So the case stays open. Not because "the real killer is still on the loose", OJ Rogoz.
  9. I know more about this as of today than I'm allowed to say, but rest assured there's gonna be a newspaper article on the cable cutting coming out pretty soon which will provide some more details for the tinfoil hat brigade like Bob.
  10. chucK has passed away

    That is a great story (and sounds like a full value climb), David; thanks for posting it. Even though I met Chuck almost 20 years ago, I first got to know him through the TRs he posted on rec.climbing, in the dark ages of the internet, and he was indeed a fine writer.
  11. Mountaineering Ropes

    I am new to mountaineering/glacier travel. I took a guided climb on Mt Baker last summer and will be taking a mountaineering course this coming winter. I am looking to get a rope for glacier travel and plan to start with Mt Baker again next summer. I was looking to see if there was a dedicated thread for this topic but didn't find one. If anyone knows of one could you point me in that direction? Wondering what type of ropes would be ideal for starting out with this level of climbing. I have read in various places that 3 people can be on anywhere from 30-50 m safely. I this accurate? Would 50 m be significantly extra for a 2-person rope team? The second question relates to diameter - would a half rope between 8-9mm be sufficient for this type of travel? I see that a bigger diameter rope (>9mm) is obviously going to weigh more and is often used in other types of climbing at longer lengths (60m). Is there a standard or ideal rope length and diameter that is standard or more versatile. Wondering what the thoughts are on trade-off between diameter, weight, length, durability and versatility. Any thoughts would be appreciated! Thank you, Joe
  12. Dave says topo's are aid. Good times up there Mr. Evans. A real treat for me to hang with, and watch David (the tooth fairy) Whitelaw at work.
  13. I'm offering the following titles for purchase. Prices include shipping cost. PPFF or Venmo payment options. ------------------------- Sold - Sandia Select - 1999, Mick Schein - Excellent perused condition without climbing notations. Note on the inside cover by the former owner. Asking $10.00. 2009 edition of The Worlds Most Significant Climbs - Printed on heavier weight stock. Very good read condition with 2 creases on the front cover. Asking $10.00. Sacred Mountains of The World - Edwin Bernbaum - 1992, The Sierra Club - 9"x12", heavier weight stock, photo's and text. Excellent used condition, asking $14.00. Lennnard Zinn, 2001, Velo Press Boulder, CO, 3rd Edition - 353 pages covering all aspects of maintenance/repairs and of course ....... some philosophy. Excellent near new condition. Asking $14.00. Appalachian Mountain Club , 3rd Edition, 1998 - Excellent read condition - Asking $10.00. Buy 2 from this post ........ or a 2nd from the "titles list" here, mountainproject.com/forum/t… and choose a free book from the "complimentary list".
  14. Solid Gold c2c

    I’m in good hiking shape and permitless, so looking to do this car to car. Ive done Backbone ridge and Acid Baby c2c in recent weeks and would love to go back there for one more this summer. Ideally Monday 8/26 but I could be talked into other days. Give me a shout if interested, thanks!
  15. Yosemite - Wide Tour

    Arches/Crest jewel. This is the last pitch of CJ? Ujahn and I did campsite to campsite (ND Gully descent) in 8 hours. Rode bikes over to Arches base from N. Pines.
  16. Yeah, I also found the access to the ridge to be slightly harrowing late July last year. I expected a fairly direct approach from the rap across the glacier to the ridge, but we kept butting up against crevasses that weren’t visible from above, so this forced us down and to the right. As we neared the ridge the terrain became steep, icy, and riddled with crevasses. Some pro would have been nice but we had none. After traversing above gaping crevasses we reached a moat too wide to cross so I made a bollard, rapped about 10 feet into it, then scrambled up the rock on the other side and found a spot for a gear anchor for my partner. This was probably around 200 feet above the toe of the ridge and the rock climbing was immediately straightforward once on the ridge. I think it was a good place to get on, but very exposed on the way there.
  17. [TR] Stuart Range - Enchantment Linkup Uber-Lite 08/16/2019

    Table for one! Nice one Michael.
  18. chucK has passed away

    Images above were from our 2016 climb of Argonaut.
  19. chucK has passed away

    My first climb with Chuck was the East Buttress of Big Snow Mountain (1996) and the last was Argonaut (2016). As many of you know, Chuck had a penchant for writing detailed, entertaining trip reports. Chuck's TR for the '96 climb is appended below. These two climbs had their share of uncertainty, route finding on the rock climbs and descents in the darkness. Throughout these climbs our situations were always in control and composed. I can say I always felt as safe as one could or should feel in the mountains, thanks to Chuck. He was a great mentor for climbing and hiking. Even on Argonaut, a 54-year old Chuck was as amazing on lead, leading a dirty off-route 5.10+ crux pitch that took us to the summit, as the thirty-something-year-old Chuck who taught a neophyte to climb in the 90's. And Chuck led that off-route crux after almost 11 hours of continuous and sustained hiking and climbing, and he did it in hiking boots. I have to take it back, Chuck was more amazing at 54. I will fondly remember Chuck, especially on our climbs, our conversations to, from and during our hikes, and the places we all climbed together. I will miss his veiled "post climbing festivities" at many of the summits. I/we wish Chuck could have stayed with us longer. He was a wonderful friend and great outdoorsman. The world is dimmer without him. David East Buttress, Big Snow Mountain TR by Chuck Spiekerman The East Buttress of Big Snow Mountain is described in the Becky guide as "10 pitches on very firm granite, 5.7." Sounded pretty good for an alpine climb in the Cascades. I liked the sound of "very firm." Last year I had gone hiking to Hardscrabble Lakes to fish and explore. The East Buttress looms 1000 feet over Lower Hardscrabble Lake. It looked big and steep. I liked the sound of "5.7." I had a window of two days. My wife had flown to her parents in Minnesota with our 10-month old on Wednesday afternoon. At 4:30 pm Saturday I was scheduled to fly to California to go backpacking with my father. Wednesday night I packed and cleaned (I hate returning from a trip to a trashed house with food rotting in the sink) and got to bed around 11:30. I picked up Dave, a novice, but quickly learning, partner at 5:15 am. We got gas outside of North Bend but were rebuffed in our attempts to buy beer since it wasn't yet 6 am. I had been looking forward to drinking some ice cold beer stashed in snowfields at the base of the wall. Oh well. We got to the trailhead around 7am, shouldered our packs and headed up the abandoned logging road/trail to Lower Hardscrabble Lake. I was at this point sorta happy that we were beerless. My pack was heavy! Quarter mile up the logging road there is an old abandoned crane, crumpled underneath a huge fallen tree. There must be an interesting story behind that. The way up to the lake is pretty ugly as it makes its way through a clearcut wasteland (renewable resource, hah!) but becomes nice near the lake. After the lake is another kind of ugly. Loose dirt on top of shifting boulders, the kind that is deposited by the avalanches and raging streams of winter, then perched precariously by the slowly melting snow. We made it to the base of the wall by noon with only one short section of bushwhacking. Our plan was to climb a few pitches on Thursday afternoon to try to find the route through the first section of roofs since the Becky guide was not too illuminating; "The first serious pitch leads to easier climbing above. Higher, climb up and left around a slight corner to break through a steep section to a broad ledge system halfway up the buttress." There is nothing snipped from this description. We found a good way up the first pitch and a good way NOT to continue from there. We also found out that the granite was indeed solid AND clean, nice, but that protection was quite thin, not nice. Micro-nuts were employed far too frequently for my liking. I found 5.7 to be much more nervy when climbing on thin pro while quite far out in the wilderness. We left an anchor and toprope on the first pitch for the next day. Friday morning 8 am we began just south of the "snout" of the buttress (the dividing point between the SE and NE facing walls). I found the most appealing route to the first belay to traverse right up a ramp to just past a left-facing dihedral (with no pro). A thin crack at this point allows access up to a point where the aforementioned dihedral becomes a more gradual right-leaning ramp split with a giant, clean handcrack. The day before I gained the same point by traversing right, past the first crack, to a more steep crack. The first move on the 20' steep crack pulled over a bulge with finger locks then quickly allowed good jams followed by a welcome jug. This crack was pretty easy to sew up and probably goes at about 5.8+. From the first belay we followed a corner up and slightly right then traversed across left at an undercling crack. The blank (for 5.7) move gaining the undercling crack was protected by a #1 RP (but at least the placement was a perfect #1 RP bottleneck). The undercling crack took good stoppers. Too good, there is probably still a #4 rock sticking out of it. The traverse puts you underneath a 20-foot high, 5-foot wide chimney that is formed by two thick granite fins. There is a handcrack in the left corner and fun (read "easy") moves up this thing. I belayed at the top of the chimney anchored by a #1 TCU and a cordelette twisted tight around a giant block. The next pitch goes almost straight up (just slightly left). The first move, getting up a steep 6 foot corner was sorta scary due to lack of protection and pretty good exposure. After that, the angle dropped off significantly as well as did any placements for protection. I placed a Lowe Tri-cam in a shallow flaring crack that I was not happy about. I ran it out to near the end of the rope and set up a belay with 3 equalized micro-nuts and one bomber #2 rock. Besides the iffy anchor, the belay was uncomfortable, somewhat slopey. I think next time I'll look to belay earlier or try to traverse to a crack on the right. The next pitch was only about 100-120 feet so a lower belay point wouldn't slow you down. We brought no SLCD's bigger than a #2 TCU. I think there were quite a few placements in which cams up to say a #3 friend would have been preferable to our assortment of Tri-cam's and Hexes. The fourth pitch tackled the "steeper" section. This was a fairly continuous slightly overhanging 10 foot wall. I led a runout but gradual slab 40 feet up to directly underneath the wall where there was good pro. Then I traversed right, over a 4 foot step and around a corner. Solid jams around the corner and pretty good pro. Around another corner is a 45 degree sloping ramp which forms a break in the wall. This looked blank and protectionless. The left side of the ramp has a block in a corner that you can climb onto then surmount the steep wall. Above is a small tree for a belay. We had now reached the "broad ledge system." We stretched the rope over 3rd class terrain and had a quick lunch at 1 pm. On the fifth pitch I climbed an initial 30 foot blocky section then ran along the large ledge right until the end of the rope. This pitch would certainly not require a belay. Note: next time try doing a more ascending line rightward up blocky terrain to reach the base of an 80 foot left-facing dihedral just right of the buttress crest. It looks like an interesting line. It may be too hard or lead to nowhere but surely it can't be worse than most of what we did after pitch 6. The right side of the dihedral is formed by a column with a top(?) so there should be a nice belay at top as well as rappel point if it blanks out after that. At this point, time was a definite consideration. The top didn't look too far away (foreshortening I guess). It seemed doable to get there and still leave an hour or so of daylight for the descent. But, we would have to take the easiest way possible and that appeared to be right of the crest up ledge systems covered with scrub pines and heather. For the sixth pitch I traversed far to the right to get to the base of a left leaning ramp/flake system, then up the system. This was some nice climbing with good pro (medium to big hexes mostly). Pitch seven was the pitch from hell. I had decided to belay at the top of the sixth pitch just below what appeared to be a large ledge since where I was there was adequate pro and usually once you pull over onto a big heathery ledge there is none. Besides, I was pretty much out of rope. Good thing I stopped where I did as on the next lead I found no pro over dirt/heather film on gradual rock for 50 feet. Sufficiently wigged at this point I traversed far right in order to sling a tree even though the route went left. Heading back on route I found myself looking at a steep gully/dihedral with seemingly no pro. I tried a number of alternatives but the left-leaning gully was the way to go. It looked dirty but actually turned out to be nice climbing (solid stemming) with excavatable pro placements. Unfortunately, the placements were all fairly directional (downward pull) and were ALL eventually yanked out by the rope pulling sideways from the tree at the far-right. No falls, luckily, and I groveled up to and straight through some large bushy junipers (good pro yeah!). I gave myself a very becoming slash across the upper lip. This pitch took a long time because of all the vacillating I did over route direction. I'm not sure how I could do anything differently the next time except to run it out the 80 feet to the steep gully, where the pro would (probably) be good without the sideways pull. Pitches 8 and 9 were forgettable grovels straight up through the juniper. Good pro, quick easy climbing, but not very aesthetic. We stayed just right of the crest. When we did reach rock again, the rock appeared to be getting much lower in quality (lots of loose big flakes and blocks). There is a particularly dangerous loose piece about the size of a VCR perched at the top of a 20 foot orange chimney near the top of the ninth pitch. It's starting to get very shadowy in the valleys below (the wall we're on faces East) and I'm seriously worried about being benighted. A spire marking the top of the buttress is now within a rope length of us. We are under and left of it. I know the walkoff goes right and decide to traverse underneath the spire to the right. There is a nice ledge going underneath and what looks like a fairly gradual step to the top at the end. The ledge is quite exposed, good feet but not much for your hands. Pro is scarce. I get to the end of the rope and find a nice vertical crack. Oh no! I cam my hand in the crack to test the stability and a totem approximately 1 foot in diameter and 9 feet tall shifts and grates! I'm at the end of the rope, with only marginal pro 30 feet previously, so I'm forced to make do with two small pieces in a nearby crack and belay right next to the big scary loose thing. I hope Dave doesn't fall. It's a basically horizontal traverse with minimal pro, belayed by two small chocks. He didn't fall. Pheeew! It is now minutes before darkness. While belaying Dave up, I've been scanning the cliff bands to the North to memorize how to get down them in the dark. Dave arrives at the belay. We break out the headlamps, or try to. Dave's lamp is deep in his backpack underneath the second rope. Lots of cussing and fighting with the backpack and its contents while teetering on our little perch. The strain is beginning to show on the unflappable Dave. I've got a Petzl Micro and he's got the bigger Zoom. Dave lets me take the Zoom since I'm leading. I head out right on pretty good holds and, as usual, sparse pro. It's basically one move at a time since darkness has completely descended. About 30 feet out right and up I come to total blankness. No way to continue to the passage up and off the wall. Damn! After much wallowing in self-pity I know I must downclimb back to the belay. At the belay I propose that I go back across the hairy traverse and try to get up to the ridge-crest on the left of the spire. Dave agrees and I head off. Soon after I take off Dave yells that if this doesn't get us to the top we should call it a night. This is probably prudent, but I sure don't like the idea of shivering on some little belay ledge all night. I find more pro reversing the traverse and get to the top of a what was a balancy mantle. No thanks, I instead continue left on heathery ledges with small trees for pro and come to a spot that looks like it will allow upward travel. A few moves put me in a steep spot with no pro. As I've done the entire climb, I scratch at anything that looks like a crack with my chock-pick. This time I find a very thin crack and set a #1 BD stopper. I remember the strength rating of this thing is something like 900 lbs and decide to aid the next move. I fashion an aider out of my cordelette by tying it into three loops. Fighting massive rope drag I step up the loops to gain a ledge. A short traverse and I'm at the top! It's not yet apparent that we can get around to the walk-down from here but at least this would be a much more roomy and comfortable place to bivy. The trials are not completely over. It turns out that my batteries died on Dave in the middle of the ledge traverse (the extra batteries nice and cozy at the base of the wall). On top of that he almost pitched off when he tested a piece I told him to down climb from pulled. He told me later that when the rattly hex pulled out he was sure it was the end, but somehow managed to latch on to a nubbin. After calming down, he brailled himself across the ledge to where I could illuminate his path from above. He made it up the part I aided without "cheating" and we were both at the top! We split our two remaining swallows of water in celebration.
  20. Cable Car haters

    I was camping at the base of the Chief when it happened. Loud low metallic sound, thought it was some kind of heavy barge doing something out on the water at the time. Wild stuff. Does anyone have insight into how controversial, if at all, the cable car was among the local community?
  21. [TR] Das Toof - The Tooth Fairy, 5.9+ 08/15/2019

    mmmmmmmmmmmmmm good post Taanstafil. It was very nice to see you & dude. Jim has a splendid topo that Mr Whitelaw drew. Where's that topo Jim? Jake das Brit.
  22. whoa, neato trip, entertaining write-up, and fantastic pics! that Frenzel camp looks five star--both in your pics and from Himmelgeisterhorn a few years ago--must get there one of these days. any berries to feast one along the way? hope the Terror Twins made it out ok. and, hahaha: "You really should go climb both North and South Hozomeen". General's orders like that ensure mutiny. appreciate you taking the time for the report.
  23. chucK has passed away

    Another of Chuck (2nd from the left, I think he is talking to @klenke) from way back...one of the first Pubclubs I ever went to.
  24. Last week
  25. Trip: Mt Stuart - North Ridge Direct Trip Date: 08/18/2019 Trip Report: Here's a writeup I did on our trip up the North Ridge of Stuart last weekend. Many more pics in the link: http://dashertonclimbs.blog/2019/08/20/north-ridge-of-mt-stuart/ Gear Notes: SR .3-3, DR .5-2, offset nuts. Approach Notes: Esmerelda --> N Ridge --> Cascadian
  26. [TR] Das Toof - The Tooth Fairy, 5.9+ 08/15/2019

    Tanstaafl, Thanks for the info!
  27. Trip: Pickets - E & W Fury, Luna - Standards Trip Date: 08/15/2019 Trip Report: @Albuquerque Fred and I teamed up again... West Fury as the main event, East Fury happened to be in the way, Luna was convenient. Day 1: We took the water taxi to Big Beaver, leaving pretty late at 10:30am on Thursday. In about 4 hours of really good trail we were at the good log crossing right where it was supposed to be. A GPS was clutch here as there is no indication along the trail of where to turnoff and really no trail to the log. After thrashing some brush on the other side of Big Beaver Creek we wound up on the wrong (south) side of Access Creek. It is misplaced on the map by about .1 mile, shown to the south of reality; there is a tiny creek about where Access is shown on the map. After some bushwhacking upward we eventually found the climber's trail which was surprisingly good. I guess people heard about the 4G on the summit. We walked into Luna Col camp at 8pm, just in time to get one picture of the northern Pickets before they dissapeared for the next 3 days. Water is acceptably ample on BB trail and the traverse to Luna Col, lacking at the Col however. There is snow in the col and a tarn below the snow patch a 10 minute walk to the north of the col. Obligatory boat ride photo: The lake was a little low: Only good view of the southern Pickets, from the traverse to Luna: Our best view of the Furys: Day 2: We awoke at 4:45 am to lots of clouds. Onward to the Furies! Over 3 major humps and down into the basin SE of E Fury. It was all snow free which made for tedious travel. We found a ledge system at 6800' to round the SE buttress of Fury, then turned right and scrambled a talus and slab slope near a stream (last water!) We gained the east edge of the glacier at about 7400' due south of point 7820'. Crampons were required for the bare ice and moderately steep firm-ish snow ascending the east ridge of E Fury. There seems to be some mixed scrambling required at both the east and west approaches to the snowfield just below the summit. (We went up the east and down the west). Onward to West Fury! Down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up. Three towers and the summit block with loose crappy gullies between each. Tower 1: on a tip, we descended 100' on snow to a talus ledge, then scrambled up, left and up some more, then left again (you'll figure it out) to wrap around the tower not quite summiting. We soloed this. Oh, by the way, I should interject that since the lower glacier we were in total whiteout conditions and would remain so all day. This made route-finding challenging and despiriting. Tower 2: we climbed directly. Descending was trickier; scramble down an eroded dike/gully, when you approach a notch and a filthy gully on skier's right take to the arete and downclimb into the filthy gully. Legend has it descending the dike to the bottom leads to 5th class no holds traversing to get around the arete. Soloed all this. Tower 3: climb directly up a chimney just right of the obvious one. Easy soloing by now. Then we scrambled to the summit! Three times in fact; the whiteout kept making us think we were there just long enough to get excited, then another rise would loom in the white. Eventually we did make it and signed in as #22 in the register. We descended by rapping all 3 towers. Tower 1 required a 60m rope. Long and tedious trip back over E Fury, multiple basins, and many towers and rises back to camp. 12 hours round trip going hard, but with slow route finding. Morning right out from camp: Outrigger Peak and the south Fury Glacier: Mixed step on the east side of the summit of E Fury: Fred on the final summit ridge: Me descending somewhere between the Furies: Fred descending somewhere between the Furies: Gloruous summit photo on West Fury! Worth it for the views!!: Register: What, you dont mountaineer with manhattans? I left the shaker at home so we had to drink them warm, but it was pretty chilly out anyway: The rest is history. Sleep, lounge, climb Luna. We descended to Luna Camp day 3, then hiked all the way to the car day 4. Victory pose on Luna summit: Lots of this on the way out: The summit register on Luna was totally full, please replace it if you go there. 3 summits 49 miles 14,000' 12oz of manhattans Gear Notes: 60m rope for rappels Crampons Axes We took some rock gear but didn't use it. Manhattans Approach Notes: Big Beaver to Access Creek, cross Big Beaver Creek at 2520', cross Access Creek to south side at 3900'. Trail was great, trail into Access basin was decent climbers trail, good even, in places.
  28. for sale La Sportiva Batura GTX, $200, size 42.5

    If you ever come up to Squamish, I'd take these off your hands.
  29. chucK has passed away

    Hey Matt, I would be interested in carpooling; sent you a pm since I don't have your #.
  1. Load more activity
×