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Frostbite Long Term Effects

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In an unfortunate turn of events two winters ago, I got minor frostbite on the tips of my middle and index fingers of the right hand. The tissue seems to have healed up completely, though the tips of both fingers remain slightly numb.

 

In a month and a half of steady climbing this season, I'm experiencing a burning sensation on the same fingertips, both during and after climbing, usually coming when I climb multiple days in a row.

 

I was just wondering what other climbers here have experienced in long term pain after getting frostbite. Does the pain eventually go away, or is it a permanent consequence of the frostbite?

 

Thanks.

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I have carpal tunnel syndrome which has long term nerve effects. Climbing hasn't helped. Fingertip nerves are prone to long term damage from lots of sources. My fingertips are numb right now due to typing. I hope you recover quickly. I also have numb toes and my toenails don't grow anymore thanks to my Miuras and 40 yrs. of foot abuse.

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is that from your triple C adventure?

 

bummer.

 

Yup. I can still climb, just lingering pain if I overdo it. Frostbite is nasty business. Highly not recommended.

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I have done my toes (seriously nipped) and a friend his fingers (bitten). Pretty much screwed for life as the nerves and circulation are compromised. No fun as for me my toes go cold really easily. A good extended cold spell and they go numb and turn gray, a couple days later they are more or less normal. My friend has re-injured the fingers several times.

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The crazy thing about frostbite/nip is how incredibly insidious it is. Pretty much unnoticeable until the appendage starts to warm again. Then hoo boy. Let the fun begin.

 

And apparently the gift keeps on giving years later.

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Never had clinical frostbite but I did get a nasty case of frost nip on my right foot during a single push winter ascent on Baker (they were white/grey and waxy for weeks, even after warming them up). For me the numbness, tingling and general pins-and-needles feelings lasted for two years. The symptoms gradually got better and better. Now I only get symptoms when I'm out in the cold and I don't take proper care of them. And to echo what others have said it seems my toes are hypersensitive when it comes to cold conditions. Otherwise I don't have any issues.

Edited by jordansahls

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Likely raynauds syndrome d/t vascular damage associated with your frostbite. I know LOTS of skiiers who deal with it in their toes. Your previous cold injury increased the risk of subsequent vasomotor hyperactivity. Go see your family MD, it can be treated.

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I had frost injuries some decades ago and, for me, I think the residual affects have lessened with time. Happy healing.

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Likely raynauds syndrome d/t vascular damage associated with your frostbite. I know LOTS of skiiers who deal with it in their toes. Your previous cold injury increased the risk of subsequent vasomotor hyperactivity. Go see your family MD, it can be treated.

 

Good info Sol. Thanks. I may wander in to Conf. Health at some point soon.

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I had some frost nip on several finger tips in both hands back in 2004. I had cold sensitivity (got painful quickly) for a couple of seasons and some sensitivity rock climbing.

 

After a couple seasons, things got much better. I remember in 2007 doing some very cold treks in Vermont and remarking on how my fingers were finally 'right' again.

 

 

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Viagra. Supposedly works on the same receptors and can be used to treat Raynaud's.

 

I have lasting effects from frostnip I got on my fingers a few years back, which makes doing my favorite activity (ice climbing) very frustrating and an exercise in obsessive constant preventative actions for my hands while climbing. Viagra will be a last resort since my climbing pants fit tight as it is.

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Viagra will be a last resort since my climbing pants fit tight as it is.

 

Totally. Today's stretch material only goes so far.

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