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tpcollins

Closed loop or eye 2 eye for friction cord?

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If you have a closed loop, whether it's a single eye or held together by a fisherman's knot, you can only tie a prusik knot as far as I'm aware. If you have an eye 2 eye, you can tie additional knots like the Distel, Blake's, Schwabisch hitches and probably others I'm not aware of.

 

Is there a need to have anything other than a simple prusik loop if the intent is a fall restraint? Thanks.

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Not sure about the fall restraint thing other than I would never trust a friction knot to hold a fall, but you can tie a Bachmann knot or a Kliemheist knot with a closed loop.

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Is there a need to have anything other than a simple prusik loop if the intent is a fall restraint? Thanks.

 

please explain how fall restraint is used with friction hitches. Are you talking about ascending fixed lines like above the 14K camp on denali west ridge route?

 

the usual reasons for using friction hitches of any kind are for ascending ropes (crevasse rescue and in high angle rock climbing), rappel backups and to prevent slips on medium angle ground form becoming real falls (fixed lines in mountains). All of these are easily done with the standard old fashioned regular prussik hithces using small loops of cord. No need to make this more complicated than it needs to be.

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What is "eye 2 eye". I've been climbing and mountaineering for 20 years and have never heard of this. I have only ever used a prussic loop.

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I get the idea that this question isn't intended for a climbing application, maybe it's for cleaning a roof or something like that.

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I get the idea that this question isn't intended for a climbing application, maybe it's for cleaning a roof or something like that.

 

Roofing . . .

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TP, eye-to-eye cord isn't really common in the climbing community. There are sewn slings, I've always called them rabbit runners - but I would want that bar tacking rated the same as the rest of my slings, and I bet the link you gave isn't.

 

I use an autobloc or a kleimheist 99% of the time, with a closed-loop cord.

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Is there a need to have anything other than a simple prusik loop if the intent is a fall restraint? Thanks.

 

Yes. Spectra slings won't hold with a prussik. Use a Hedden, or similar. Closed loop slings are stronger than rabbit eared, but spectra is so stupid strong the difference is moot. Static vs dynamic line=whole new set of considerations. Good luck.

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Keep in mind that Spectra has a low-melting point, compared to nylon. Since I always try to stack things in my favor I never use Spectra in a friction knot application.

 

 

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