Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
tvashtarkatena

Multi day ski mountaineering packs

Recommended Posts

55-65 L

relatively light

simple (no zippers)

Good for carrying skis

removable/extendable top compartment

 

Recommendations?

 

I've checked out Osprey, BD, TNF, MH, and Dead Bird online

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Cilo 45L worksack carries skis and snowboards better than any other pack that I've had. I imagine the 60L version would work just as well in that regard.

 

I have been using it with the shovel pocket and find that to be a great place to put avy tools and I can drop my skins in behind the shovel pocket to carry securely on the way down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen a few of your trip reports and it makes me wonder what you consider to be painful... :D

 

I've been happy with it but I really wish Cilo still did custom work so I could order any particular pack with the suspension of the next one up just for humping ski gear around(the last time I checked their site it said "too busy for custom work").

 

I don't know that I've had it up to 60 pounds but I think I was around 50 coming out of the Sisters in July. I had a full rack of cams/nuts, my personal climbing gear, all of a 2 person tent, and 4 liters of water plus sleeping bag, stove, and the remains of 2.5 days of food.

 

I've also carried it on more than a handful of dry approaches to ski tours. The split kit isn't the lightest, think fat pow ski with dynafits plus another set of snowboard bindings and extra hardware to hold it all together.

 

One of the things that I really like about the 45L pack is that it collapses down to a 22L pack and still carries the split kit really well. What I really don't like about it is that it encourages me to carry more stuff than I need because I have space to fill. I've found it to be a very versatile pack for everything that I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's mainly the shoulder straps digging in under heavy loads I'm wondering about. I don't tend to fill in extra pack space - I've got a set kit for each kind of trip and that's what goes with me. I want lots of extendability (that's apparently not a real word) so my multi day ski pack can double as a big wall approach dump truck.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Looks like the 45 extends all the way to 75 L. Seems like that would work. Have your carried any big loads (50 - 60 lbs) in it? Not too painful?

 

I've carried big loads (week long trips) in my cilogear (for the record, I think mine was the 60L). It carries well for a frameless pack, especially if you pack wisely, but it was not the most durable pack I've ever had. It lasted about two seasons of heavy 4-season use before the shoulder strap ripped off (almost exactly upon arriving at the parking lot after a 5-day ski trip of all things). It was an earlier version of the pack, and I'm sure Graham would have fixed it for me but I fell in love with another pack in the meantime ;)

 

Edit: P.S. if you want lots of "Extendability" and customization for different trips, then you will LOVE the cilogear packs.

Edited by rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a BD Speed 40 for a 5 day ski traverse a couple of years back and it wasn't all that comfy. My POS-but-cheap Marmot Alpinist 55 (which I should have taken instead) is blowing apart - never was a quality item, so its time for a replacement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, I think the Cilogear 60L carries weight well for an internal. I've had 60 lbs in it. It's definitely better if you leave the frame sheet in, but you can take it out to save some weight. I've had mine for 4 years of moderate use. I don't have probs with the shoulder straps. I, too, have a BD Speed 40, and the shoulder straps start to give me problems (digging in and some rubbing/blisters) with 50 lbs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know you said "no zippers," but I think a zipper has a very good purpose on a ski-mountaineering pack. Add a u-shaped zipper on the side, and you can pull out a puffy without messing around when you stop for a quick break, stuff it back in ten minutes later, and you are good to go. You pack the pack more or less as normal, but stuff the puffy into the area that will be just inside the zipper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whichever one didn't piss you off most recently.

 

In my experience, no matter how much I like a pack for multi-day ski trips initially, eventually I will hate it. Is it big enough to hold everything you might want? Then it's too big to ski well. Is it small enough to ski well? Then it will be annoying packing or unpacking it. It will probably even explode somewhere when you overstuff it for the umpteenth time.

 

I usually like them best after one or two trips. So a pack that's been tested by only one or two trips. The Wild Things Ice Sac was probably my most enduring favorite for a few years there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't get pissed at my pack. Too busy being pissed off by my shitty ski skills. 30 year telemarker turned AT, yo. Never learned to downhill as a wee one. Or an adult one, for that matter. If I could rent Sky's legs for certain trips that might mitigate this issue. I'd probably have to rent his head, too, though, to keep the whimpering down.

 

I'll tolerate a zip on an otherwise good pack, but I won't use it. Got my 'get the puffy' system down already (no pun int.). Zips are the weakest thing on a pack. They invariably fail first. I stretch the capacity of light packs, so I'd destroy a side zipper right quick.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're anywhere near Bellingham you can check out my 45L Cilo pack and even through skis and other parts of the kit on or in it to see how it feels to you. I think you'll like the simple sack and lots of D-rings/tri-slides for changing how it carries a load and attaching stuff to the outside of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have purchased too many packs to count over the years and I always go back to my old Deuter Guide 45+ for multiday trips. It’s big enough to hold all your crap and small enough so you don’t over pack. It skis very well and carries skis well. You can access your stuff from the top, side and near the bottom and make two separate compartments if you want near the bottom. It also holds ice tools well. I do add an OR Crampon Pouch to the outside and it holds both boot and ski crampons plus screw and two. I know 45L is a little on the small side but if you pack smart it is all I usually need.

Mine is at least 8 years old and have stuffed it to the max many times and the zippers have not failed. I like the side and bottom zippers so I don’t have to pull everything out of my pack to get to something near the bottom. I also like the ability to make a bottom compartment the put stuff like my bivi gear. That way it stays dry if I’m in and out of my pack in bad weather changing layers all the time.

 

I also have the BD Speed. I think they make it in a 55L, I have the 40L. It skis great, no zippers but the skirt started to rip out at the seams so I ended up ripping it out. It is very minimalist but functional. Other than skirt problem I recommend it if you want to stay away from zippers and go light.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to be clear, I've got a BD Speed 40 for shorter trips - I'm looking to round out the quiver for more volume and comfy straps for heavier loads - longer trips and big wall approaches. I need 55 to 65 L, relatively light, super simple, more comfy than the Speed (but it doesn't have to be a back sofa or anything - I can take a little pain the first day or two). I already pack super light, but 10 days worth of food w/climbing gear or 7 days worth w/skis only gets so small, and my shoulders can only take so much.

 

Thanks, Jason, for your offer. I'm gonna try to take you up on it in Oct sometime if we can mutually schedule a meet. Sep is fawked completely.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're welcome anytime. I don't currently have any work travel planned so I should be around. My schedule is pretty consistent at work M-F 7-4 and get out in the mountains on the weekends but lately it's been housework on the weekends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't wait for the current pack trend to die (lighter, poor durability, and poor comfort). I've certainly tried the overpack a small pack thing, but it always sucks. Not worth it in my experience.

 

If you drink a little muscle milk before you go, and decide you can carry a whopping 1-2 more pounds of pack weight in that 65 lb pack then try the Deuter Aircontact series. The Deuter bags have been pretty durable for me, and heavier fabric is worth every ounce when strapping 6 foot long knives to your back.

 

I've pushed 100 lbs in my Aircontact65, though that was a bit too much. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an Arcteryx Needle that I like pretty well for longer trips. They make both 55 and 65 sizes.

 

For me the key to shoulder comfort is a homemade tumpline. I made one out of a mesh material with clips that attach to the pack's compression straps. I find that taking just 10 pounds or so on the tumpline is all I need to relieve my sore shoulders. When I did more overnights each year this was never an issue but today my shoulders just aren't in shape for heavier loads.

 

I only use the tumpline for approach hikes. Interestingly, my shoulders never hurt when I'm skiing. I think it must be the bouncing motion of walking that does it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to Google "tumpline". I've never seen one in action but it looks like an interesting way to take some of the load off the shoulders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had to Google "tumpline".

 

ha, me too. I even found a patagonia tumpline for sale, surprisingly less than one thousand dollars

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out the Cold Cold World Chernobyl and Chaos. Ski, climb, and carry well. No Zippers, removable top lid. Reasonable weight with bomber construction. Haven't bought one in awhile but customizations were easy and fairly priced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a photo of my homemade tumpline, made of pack materials bought at Seattle Fabrics:

 

homemade-tumpline.jpg

 

And here's a photo of the tumpline in use on the Downey Creek trail a few years ago:

 

LSkoog-20050530-0014-Lowell-with-tumpline.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never got a pic of my Nepalese souvenir...fortunately.

 

I don't see a tumpline in my particular future - I've got a bit more fatback to distribute the shoulder weight than you do Lowell, you aerobic machine, but I am looking at the Dead Bird packs - a brand I usually ignore due to their typical hyper premium pricing (their packs aren't all that spendy in comparison, actually, and it pays to blow a little extra cash for something that won't blow up under a pair of skis).

 

I should have switched to AT the day I saw you jump turn down the wet cement of Sefrit. That would have saved me years of unnecessary pain and suffering. The tripwire finally went off when I cartwheeled down the Lookout Mtns forested approach one night chasing Mr. Kaplan. 3 weeks later I had a brand new Dynafit setup and an entire quiver of tely gear, including an unmounted pair of skis, flushed down Craigslist. It's been heaven after that.

 

The Cilos and CCW also have nice offerings. Time to try some stuff on, I reckon.

 

Edited by tvashtarkatena

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×