Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
i_like_sun

Physician Assistant

Recommended Posts

Not I - but two of my good friends are PAs. One does the 9-5 (well 8am - midnight) 3 days / week. He works hard and tells us great stories about removing glass out of legs and taking Xrays of severe breaks. His stories make me queasy.

 

My other friend travels alot; last year he worked in Antarctica and South Africa. Right now is he doing the Bush Alaska circuit. He loves his job - and likewise works hard and finds it very rewarding. They both make my job seem trivial and boring.

 

 

Yeah, thanks! I'm thinking of applying to PA school next year...... Everyone I talk to about it speaks very highly of the field, and I know that you can make a pretty penny at it too.

 

I dated a girl who was a PA. Had been for about 5 years, worked in Vancouver, WA and made about $14.50 an hour. What do you consider a “pretty penny"?

 

Uhm, yeah, right. Thats odd, considering that the national MEDIAN salary for PA's working at least 32 hours per week is around $81,000 per year, and for new graduates in a first time job, around $70,000 per year. The top 10% of all PA's in the United States make more than $100,000 per year, and the lowest 10% make less than $50,000 per year. Overall, from the statistics I've read, it looks like I could continue my current "lets play as much as possible" philosophy as a PA, and still provide a service to society while eliminating financial anxiety.

 

As for graduate nurse practitioner programs, it looks like I would still have to go through the steps of first being established as an RN, then work on the Masters of Science. I don't know, seems like too much to do considering I've just spent the past five years earning my bachelors degree in something thats NOT an RN program........ :rolleyes:

UW offers a fast track (3 years) Masters in Nursing program that requires no medical or nursing experience; entry requirement is any Bachelors degree with the usual prerequisites -- courses which a PT grad has already taken. Also, your PT education might be adequately favorable for the subjective part of the entrance evaluation. The rest would be GPA on relevant courses and your enthusiasm for delivering health care.

 

UW website states the first five quarters are intensive -- up to 7 days per week of classroom time and clinical rotations that clear the way for completion of the Masters and make you eligible to sit for the state NCLEX exam for an RN license.

 

It will cost you, but completion of the Masters in Nursing would qualify you to sit for an ARNP license. As of a couple years ago, NPs in Washington have medication prescriptive authority and can practice independently within the scope of their licensure. Job listings for the same position often seek either a PA or an NP. Pay may be about the same, as may be demand for either profession in rural areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not I - but two of my good friends are PAs. One does the 9-5 (well 8am - midnight) 3 days / week. He works hard and tells us great stories about removing glass out of legs and taking Xrays of severe breaks. His stories make me queasy.

 

My other friend travels alot; last year he worked in Antarctica and South Africa. Right now is he doing the Bush Alaska circuit. He loves his job - and likewise works hard and finds it very rewarding. They both make my job seem trivial and boring.

 

 

Yeah, thanks! I'm thinking of applying to PA school next year...... Everyone I talk to about it speaks very highly of the field, and I know that you can make a pretty penny at it too.

 

I dated a girl who was a PA. Had been for about 5 years, worked in Vancouver, WA and made about $14.50 an hour. What do you consider a “pretty penny"?

 

Uhm, yeah, right. Thats odd, considering that the national MEDIAN salary for PA's working at least 32 hours per week is around $81,000 per year, and for new graduates in a first time job, around $70,000 per year. The top 10% of all PA's in the United States make more than $100,000 per year, and the lowest 10% make less than $50,000 per year. Overall, from the statistics I've read, it looks like I could continue my current "lets play as much as possible" philosophy as a PA, and still provide a service to society while eliminating financial anxiety.

 

As for graduate nurse practitioner programs, it looks like I would still have to go through the steps of first being established as an RN, then work on the Masters of Science. I don't know, seems like too much to do considering I've just spent the past five years earning my bachelors degree in something thats NOT an RN program........ :rolleyes:

UW offers a fast track (3 years) Masters in Nursing program that requires no medical or nursing experience; entry requirement is any Bachelors degree with the usual prerequisites -- courses which a PT grad has already taken. Also, your PT education might be adequately favorable for the subjective part of the entrance evaluation. The rest would be GPA on relevant courses and your enthusiasm for delivering health care.

 

UW website states the first five quarters are intensive -- up to 7 days per week of classroom time and clinical rotations that clear the way for completion of the Masters and make you eligible to sit for the state NCLEX exam for an RN license.

 

It will cost you, but completion of the Masters in Nursing would qualify you to sit for an ARNP license. As of a couple years ago, NPs in Washington have medication prescriptive authority and can practice independently within the scope of their licensure. Job listings for the same position often seek either a PA or an NP. Pay may be about the same, as is demand for the profession in rural areas.

 

The Masters entry program is a good way to go, and would, in many cases, require but three years of school. That is unless you were looking to move into the only ARNP focal area worth getting into, which is the FNP. The FNP is now a Doctoral degree at the UW, or clinical Doctorate (DNP), and would likely take an additional three years after your NCLEX. If you want to practice rural medicine, you have to shoot for the lifespan practitioner, the FNP. The rest are really a waste of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope this isn't too off topic, but my LMP rocks and makes good money. She went to the Brian Utting school and spoke highly of it. Anyone know anything about the different massage schools and the WA req's to practice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hope this isn't too off topic, but my LMP rocks and makes good money. She went to the Brian Utting school and spoke highly of it. Anyone know anything about the different massage schools and the WA req's to practice?

 

Off topic but here's what I know. There's some info about current requirements to get licensed in WA on the state licensing site. Do a google search and you'll find it. I looked into it about 5 years ago as a way to put myself through RN school. Was a 1 year full time program costing about $8k and none of it would have applied to RN prep. So I just went straight to nursing school ...took out loans instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not I - but two of my good friends are PAs. One does the 9-5 (well 8am - midnight) 3 days / week. He works hard and tells us great stories about removing glass out of legs and taking Xrays of severe breaks. His stories make me queasy.

 

My other friend travels alot; last year he worked in Antarctica and South Africa. Right now is he doing the Bush Alaska circuit. He loves his job - and likewise works hard and finds it very rewarding. They both make my job seem trivial and boring.

 

 

Yeah, thanks! I'm thinking of applying to PA school next year...... Everyone I talk to about it speaks very highly of the field, and I know that you can make a pretty penny at it too.

 

I dated a girl who was a PA. Had been for about 5 years, worked in Vancouver, WA and made about $14.50 an hour. What do you consider a “pretty penny"?

 

Uhm, yeah, right. Thats odd, considering that the national MEDIAN salary for PA's working at least 32 hours per week is around $81,000 per year, and for new graduates in a first time job, around $70,000 per year. The top 10% of all PA's in the United States make more than $100,000 per year, and the lowest 10% make less than $50,000 per year. Overall, from the statistics I've read, it looks like I could continue my current "lets play as much as possible" philosophy as a PA, and still provide a service to society while eliminating financial anxiety.

 

As for graduate nurse practitioner programs, it looks like I would still have to go through the steps of first being established as an RN, then work on the Masters of Science. I don't know, seems like too much to do considering I've just spent the past five years earning my bachelors degree in something thats NOT an RN program........ :rolleyes:

UW offers a fast track (3 years) Masters in Nursing program that requires no medical or nursing experience; entry requirement is any Bachelors degree with the usual prerequisites -- courses which a PT grad has already taken. Also, your PT education might be adequately favorable for the subjective part of the entrance evaluation. The rest would be GPA on relevant courses and your enthusiasm for delivering health care.

 

UW website states the first five quarters are intensive -- up to 7 days per week of classroom time and clinical rotations that clear the way for completion of the Masters and make you eligible to sit for the state NCLEX exam for an RN license.

 

It will cost you, but completion of the Masters in Nursing would qualify you to sit for an ARNP license. As of a couple years ago, NPs in Washington have medication prescriptive authority and can practice independently within the scope of their licensure. Job listings for the same position often seek either a PA or an NP. Pay may be about the same, as may be demand for either profession in rural areas.

 

 

 

Yeah, I just got done looking at that website...... Looks interesting. The nursing philosophy is different to that of PA's (I think) which are trained extremely similar to the ways MD's are trained to think......

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not I - but two of my good friends are PAs. One does the 9-5 (well 8am - midnight) 3 days / week. He works hard and tells us great stories about removing glass out of legs and taking Xrays of severe breaks. His stories make me queasy.

 

My other friend travels alot; last year he worked in Antarctica and South Africa. Right now is he doing the Bush Alaska circuit. He loves his job - and likewise works hard and finds it very rewarding. They both make my job seem trivial and boring.

 

 

Yeah, thanks! I'm thinking of applying to PA school next year...... Everyone I talk to about it speaks very highly of the field, and I know that you can make a pretty penny at it too.

 

I dated a girl who was a PA. Had been for about 5 years, worked in Vancouver, WA and made about $14.50 an hour. What do you consider a “pretty penny"?

 

Uhm, yeah, right. Thats odd, considering that the national MEDIAN salary for PA's working at least 32 hours per week is around $81,000 per year, and for new graduates in a first time job, around $70,000 per year. The top 10% of all PA's in the United States make more than $100,000 per year, and the lowest 10% make less than $50,000 per year. Overall, from the statistics I've read, it looks like I could continue my current "lets play as much as possible" philosophy as a PA, and still provide a service to society while eliminating financial anxiety.

 

As for graduate nurse practitioner programs, it looks like I would still have to go through the steps of first being established as an RN, then work on the Masters of Science. I don't know, seems like too much to do considering I've just spent the past five years earning my bachelors degree in something thats NOT an RN program........ :rolleyes:

UW offers a fast track (3 years) Masters in Nursing program that requires no medical or nursing experience; entry requirement is any Bachelors degree with the usual prerequisites -- courses which a PT grad has already taken. Also, your PT education might be adequately favorable for the subjective part of the entrance evaluation. The rest would be GPA on relevant courses and your enthusiasm for delivering health care.

 

UW website states the first five quarters are intensive -- up to 7 days per week of classroom time and clinical rotations that clear the way for completion of the Masters and make you eligible to sit for the state NCLEX exam for an RN license.

 

It will cost you, but completion of the Masters in Nursing would qualify you to sit for an ARNP license. As of a couple years ago, NPs in Washington have medication prescriptive authority and can practice independently within the scope of their licensure. Job listings for the same position often seek either a PA or an NP. Pay may be about the same, as may be demand for either profession in rural areas.

 

 

 

Yeah, I just got done looking at that website...... Looks interesting. The nursing philosophy is different to that of PA's (I think) which are trained extremely similar to the ways MD's are trained to think......

 

Thanks.

 

Trained to think? Sounds more like you are looking for the prestiege of the MD, without having to wade through med school. I think you will find that the MD approach to healthcare is a big part of what is fundamentally wrong with our system today. On the other hand, the nursing approach takess more of a holistic treatment/prevention angle. When heads are pulled from asses, you will see healthcare move toward this prevention model, as it is offered at a fraction of the price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember this ILS. You are right about the training philosphies of nurses, MDs and PAs and even Chiropractors for that matter. There are good nurses and bad nurses, good MDs and bad ones and so on... what is important is the individual practioner attitude towards patient care and disease prevention/healing. You are who you are as a person and at the end of the day that will shine through in whatever model you chose to be trained in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is precisely why I want to go into health care. I want to offer people the very best of what I have and actually improve individual's life quality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That is precisely why I want to go into health care. I want to offer people the very best of what I have and actually improve individual's life quality.

 

Excellent!

 

Forget about the money the women. Money can be made in any field, and women are everywhere.

 

What do you really want to do? Really search yourself in your deepest heart of hearts

 

Is it really health Care?

 

Focus first on what you want.

 

Fight for it will all you have to be the very best at it and suddenly the money will be there.

From time to time look to your left and right, and one day you will see her right next to you doing the very same thing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From time to time look to your left and right, and one day you will see her right next to you doing the very same thing.

 

spitting when she talks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From time to time look to your left and right, and one day you will see her right next to you doing the very same thing.

 

spitting when she talks?

:lmao::lmao::lmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK yeah, that was a GOOD comeback!

 

Hopefully she does a lot more than just spit when she talks!

 

yeah, yeah, ha, ha. Sure that was funny.

 

Focus on what you want.

Fight to be the best.

Forget about the rest because it will come along as long as you do the first two.

 

If you were to focus on money and women you will end up with neither.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ILS-

Don't know if this will help or not, but for what it's worth, I looked into this for myself quite a few years ago and came away with the following impressions.

As greta mentioned earlier in most (all?) states you work under an MD's supervision. This can be great or can suck mightily. Usually a PA handles the routine cases, which would become, well, routine after a while. You might end up working the hours and doing things your MD doesn't want. Or you might be in some rural area that would be great for a climber, doing challenging stuff. Depends on what you can find. Also, if things haven't changed, you can specialize in different types of practice, fr'instance surgical PA or anesthesiology, which can make alot of money, but less independence.

Also consider that the medical world is full of hierarchies, which can be frustrating, ask any nurse who has stood there watching a new intern that knows half what they know telling everybody what to do. Unless you're the top dog (MD)it can suck.

PAs aren't usually the top dog.

I decided to go to paramedic school instead, 1 year instead of two, you're in the field doing fairly dramatic stuff, most work 24 hour on 48 hour off shifts, which is great for climbing during the week, and if you get on with a fire department the pay is almost as good and when you've had enough you still have a job as a firefighter. And most departments let you work out during the shift. Plus there's the whole driving with a siren thing. :grin:

I was looking for a way to help people and make a living. I felt like I had a lot of questions about whether traditional western medicine and alternative medicine were always helpful, but I felt sure that when somebody is hanging upside down and bleeding in their wrecked car that getting them out would definitely help. The reality turned out to be more complicated, and I'm not a paramedic anymore, but I feel pretty good about some of the things I was able to do.

I don't know your background, but I would suggest finding a way to observe or volunteer in a health care setting before you make a down payment. You have to be nice to people who are not at their best, handle the blood and guts without being bothered, and know how to be compassionate without getting too atttached, because things don't always work out. It's not for everybody, RNs and LPNs seem like some of the greatest people in the world to me, I think they should make more than sports stars.

Hope this helps, sorry it's so long, I guess I had a lot to say, good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, miladugga, THANK YOU. I can't believe the magnitude of genuine responses this thread has gotten. All these words are helping me hugely.

 

Its a pretty tough game, deciding where to put one's energy. As I said earlier, the reason for my wanting to go into healthcare is because of my heart and mind. I want more than just to "help people", I want to change people's lives for the better - especially when it comes to injuries and lifestyle management. It seems like so many out there suffer every day for reasons that could easily be remedied, and I want to have an effect on that.

 

I decided this year that medical school is probably not for me. You see, after putting myself through honestly the roughest battle I've ever gone through, I don't think that the stress and sleep deprivation of four MORE years is what I want to put myself through. On top of that, it seems as though doctors in general live higher stress lives than most (the national statistic for average hours worked per week is 60) and I want to do a lot more than JUST my career. Like climbing mountains and raising kids, for example. So there you have it.

 

I'm pretty sure that I've narrowed my search down to PT, PA, or LNP. I've also considered Osteopathic or Naturopathic medical school. The problem I have with there are: Osteopaths are basically the exact same thing as MD's, so there are the same "not wanting to age myself any faster with excessive stress" problems; Naturopaths seem to have to bust ass super hard just to make a buck - mostly because the field is still "new" to this culture, and its not main stream (an ND friend of mine even told me "just go get your MD degree, and practice with the philosophy of an ND. The path has already been pathed for you when it comes to making a living"). Who knows anymore.........I seem to over think things so excessively that I work myself into a confused mess, and then I just want to say fugg it all and become a climbing dirt bag for the rest of my life.

 

OK, ramble over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ILS. Go work with some people in those fields as a "shadow" and see what their "typical" day is like. This can be very telling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a good friend who just went thru the program and loved it. She also said that exper in the med field was req'd for the UW thing--she had been a pretty high up person at Sweedish. She loved school, and I think will make a great PA.

It sounds like a really great field to be in--good luck. I think there is a pretty big need for more PAs!!

 

I hear your friend is taking a badass job in more southern locales.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×