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fenderfour

Ski noob seeks advice

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I've always wondered if there are people who don't like skiing. Do they exist?

 

Skiing sux boxing_smiley.gif Skiing is for those who are too weak or fat to ice-climb.

 

You just don't know how to ski Dru. Sucker!

 

Ice climbing is good. Sometimes you have to climb ice to get to the skiing, but the skiing is always better.

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This is what I'd do:

 

- Get a pass at the Summit at Snoqualmie. It's $300, and you'll be able to ski at Alpental which has great terrain (even for beginners) or even at the Summit the first few times if you want to start easy.

 

- Get a rental ski package. Less than $150 for the season. Beginner / interm skis and average boots but fine to start. Get a package in a shop, not a resort, so you can decide to go ski Stevens or Crystal later to see other places. Or get Sky's skis and buy him pitchers smile.gif But his skis may be a bit harder on a beginner than the rental ones.

 

- Take a few lessons. There's a pretty cheap I believe collective class at Summit Central every Wednesday night from 7pm to 9pm for 6 or 8 weeks. I taught it last year and had 4 students in my group (the most advanced one) which isn't bad.

 

- Invest also in a couple individual (private) lessons. Ask for someone certified, a Level 2 or better would be nice (Level 1 doesn't mean much). Take them after the collective, or one in the middle and one after.

 

Don't buy gear this year. You'll make huge progress, and the gear you'll want to buy will be different from the gear you'll want. Going to AT after that will be a simple matter as all you'll need to learn is to skin up.

 

Ski, ski, ski... I skied ~80 times last year, which isn't bad at all with a full time job!

 

Skiing is great fun. Ski mountaineering is even greater fun!

 

drC

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Whatever you get, be sure you are willing to trash it, because you will.

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Actually, I thought about it more; forget the 200 cm. Too long. I am 6' and ski 188 cm very stiff skis, and it takes a lot of technique to move these in your typical backcountry snow. Look for shorter things, maybe around 184 cm for you to stash. And for this year, go with a rental setup and lessons.

 

We can meet around beers to chat more about those things if you want.

 

drC

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