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Eric Anderson

Fit enough?

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And just to chime in with my biased opinion, I think cycling is an incredible way to train for climbing. I've used cycling to train for everything from half ironman triathlons to marathons and climbs. It really is great because it is low impact. :tup:

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What advice would you give to a newbie from Louisiana climbing Rainier this July? The highest spot here is the roof of my house and it does not look like I will be able to make it much higher between now and then.

 

I am currently doing high intensity cardio 4-5 times per week with at least 1-2 of those including inlcine treadmill and/or stairmaster with a 55# pack. Cardio sessions usually last 1 hour and try to do interval work getting to to 75-80% of my HR max during all sessions. I cross train with swimming, biking, running, and tae-kwon-do for my cardio sessions on days without a pack.

 

I plan on increasing the number of cardio workouts with a pack slowily over the next three months. Eventually doing 4-5 (in lieu of other cardio) sessions per week with a loaded pack up to 65#. I am planning to start a longer (3-4 hour) slow hike on area trails on a weekend periodically.

 

I also weight train 3 days per week.

 

Not much I can do here to simulate the altitude, but by May the humidity here will be a bitch. Does anyone have any suggestions that might help?

 

I did complete a 7 day glacier course and Summit on Mt. Shuksan last year and have done a few snow hikes in Colorado, but this will only be my second true alpine climb.

 

I found that my stamina and breathing were ok on Shuksan, I had the most trouble with the approach hike and a 65# pack. My hips and legs were on fire.

 

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

holy $#%# dude you are legit you are going to crush rainier. I decide to train a couple of days before doing rainier, my training consists of climbing other mountains. maybe yogging a little bit...(its pronounced with a soft j correct?) anyways I was wondering why you were carrying a 65lb pack? what was in there

usually I climb with a 35-40lb pack and I am trying to cut even that down.

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""What advice would you give to a newbie from Louisiana climbing Rainier this July? The highest spot here is the roof of my house""

 

go find the nearest high school or college football stadium after hours/weekends and climb up and down the bleachers with the heavy pack. The stairmaster doesn't quite duplicate the proper motion.

 

I've done this when stuck in the flatlands.

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im a big proponent of running up mountains. don't just hike si with a heavy pack, run up it and carry nothing except for a jacket. walk down. this is of course not so easy if you live in a flat place...but the benefit is less time, more fun, less stress on joints, increased balance, and deeper lungs, a very important thing for feeling good at altitude. more o2 the better

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Based on the info my guide sent out, we should be prepared to carry a 50#+ pack. we are doing a 4 day Emmons route so we will have a bit more group gear. I would be much happier if I trained heavy and the pack felt lighter on the actual climb.

 

Stadium steps are a great idea too. The Stairmaster I use is like a rotating stair case (not the traditional stairmaster) so it is a bit more similar.

 

We do have the levee here along the Mississippi River, so I thought about walking up and down that for long distances as well.

 

Anyway, I would rather be over-prepared. Outside of the additional cardio with a pack, this routine is not much more than I regularly do so I am not worried about overtraining.

 

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What advice would you give to a newbie from Louisiana climbing Rainier this July? The highest spot here is the roof of my house and it does not look like I will be able to make it much higher between now and then.

 

I am currently doing high intensity cardio 4-5 times per week with at least 1-2 of those including inlcine treadmill and/or stairmaster with a 55# pack. Cardio sessions usually last 1 hour and try to do interval work getting to to 75-80% of my HR max during all sessions. I cross train with swimming, biking, running, and tae-kwon-do for my cardio sessions on days without a pack.

 

I plan on increasing the number of cardio workouts with a pack slowily over the next three months. Eventually doing 4-5 (in lieu of other cardio) sessions per week with a loaded pack up to 65#. I am planning to start a longer (3-4 hour) slow hike on area trails on a weekend periodically.

 

I also weight train 3 days per week.

 

Not much I can do here to simulate the altitude, but by May the humidity here will be a bitch. Does anyone have any suggestions that might help?

 

I did complete a 7 day glacier course and Summit on Mt. Shuksan last year and have done a few snow hikes in Colorado, but this will only be my second true alpine climb.

 

I found that my stamina and breathing were ok on Shuksan, I had the most trouble with the approach hike and a 65# pack. My hips and legs were on fire.

 

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

What you are already doing will get you in great shape for Ranier. Just be careful not to over train. Allow your body to fully recover between workouts. Take an extra rest day every few weeks. Listen to your body. +1 on most of the suggestions here:

 

-Cycling and roller blading == great cross training for climbing

-Stairs

-Interval workouts

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Sounds like you've got a good handle on your training. A four day Emmons trip does have a heavier pack than say the standard Muir climb, so good to prepare for that. The one thing I've noticed with many of my clients who've trained for Rainier is they often find the descent was harder than the ascent. In my experience, stairmasters are good for the muscles utilized in ascending but not for descending. Train your muscles for the descent and you will really kick some butt!

 

Based on the info my guide sent out, we should be prepared to carry a 50#+ pack. we are doing a 4 day Emmons route so we will have a bit more group gear. I would be much happier if I trained heavy and the pack felt lighter on the actual climb.

 

Stadium steps are a great idea too. The Stairmaster I use is like a rotating stair case (not the traditional stairmaster) so it is a bit more similar.

 

We do have the levee here along the Mississippi River, so I thought about walking up and down that for long distances as well.

 

Anyway, I would rather be over-prepared. Outside of the additional cardio with a pack, this routine is not much more than I regularly do so I am not worried about overtraining.

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Suggestions for descent training (other than actual climbs)?

 

....The one thing I've noticed with many of my clients who've trained for Rainier is they often find the descent was harder than the ascent. In my experience, stairmasters are good for the muscles utilized in ascending but not for descending. Train your muscles for the descent and you will really kick some butt!

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Suggestions for descent training (other than actual climbs)?

 

Lunges - foward lunge and static lunge.

 

+1 on the above advise - esp. rest. Really taper off your training two weeks prior to the climb, keep to an easy maintenance sch. with 2 - 3 rest days.

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descents work you over because of the eccentric action of your legs (deceleration under load). Riding a bike has zero eccentric component, same with regular stairmasters and ellipticals, swimming has zero.

Squats start with an eccentric action (lowering your butt slower than gravity). Jumping (on a box, broad jumps, whatever) are eccentric at the moment you land. Walking DOWN stairs.

 

I like squats.

 

http://www.exrx.net/Kinesiology/Squats.html

 

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How about rowing machines? Is that considered an eccentric action?

 

When I've climbed volcanoes with newbies, the cardio goal was to run 8 miles (hilly if you can find them) in an hour or less plus taking some good long day hikes with heavy packs on. Weighted squats and deadlifts would be good strenght training preparation.

 

How about mental fitness? While watching some of the documentary "Summit on the Summit", I recalled how much of a surprise it can be to newbies that a significant portion of the experience is suffering with wet gear, cold hands and toes, fatigue, physical pain, self doubt, fear of failure etc. Good partners (or guides) will help overcome some of these issues but in the end it may come down to confidence in your preparation and mental toughness.

Edited by Bronco

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not much eccentric in a rower either. I'm not saying that all these other "cardio" efforts (swimming biking rowing) are a waste of time in prepping for a big mountaineering day. There may be better ways (more time efficient and sport specific), there's definitely worse ways (no training at all). I'm just saying that if that's all you do, don't be surprised if your legs get sore on the descent. And if you add in some training that more closely matches the downhill, constant deceleration, action of descending, then that part of your adventure will be more enjoyable too.

 

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"How about mental fitness? While watching some of the documentary "Summit on the Summit", I recalled how much of a surprise it can be to newbies that a significant portion of the experience is suffering with wet gear, cold hands and toes, fatigue, physical pain, self doubt, fear of failure etc. Good partners (or guides) will help overcome some of these issues but in the end it may come down to confidence in your preparation and mental toughness."

 

The only way to overcome this is by climbing, preferably in tough conditions, with people you trust.

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The only way to overcome this is by climbing, preferably in tough conditions, with people you trust.

 

I agree climbing is one of the best methods to train your mind but the intent of this thread seems to be geared toward those without opportunity to participate in training climbs.

 

Go for a long bike ride or trail run in incremental weather. If you can find a tractor tire and convince someone to spray you with cold water from the hose while you do tire flips, that would also be good preparation. I remember seeing an article about a fanatic setting up a stair stepper in a vacant shower stall for the same purpose. In the absence of climbing opportunity, find a tough excercise and find ways to make them mentally degrading once in a while.

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The only way to overcome this is by climbing, preferably in tough conditions, with people you trust.

 

I agree climbing is one of the best methods to train your mind but the intent of this thread seems to be geared toward those without opportunity to participate in training climbs.

 

Go for a long bike ride or trail run in incremental weather. If you can find a tractor tire and convince someone to spray you with cold water from the hose while you do tire flips, that would also be good preparation. I remember seeing an article about a fanatic setting up a stair stepper in a vacant shower stall for the same purpose. In the absence of climbing opportunity, find a tough excercise and find ways to make them mentally degrading once in a while.

 

When the next big storm or sub-zero temps hit your area, pitch a tent in the back yard. Sleep there. Cook your meals on the camp stove you intend to have on the trip, go for a 30 mile bike ride in the storm as suggested above...etc....you get the idea.

 

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