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monoloco

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About monoloco

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  • Birthday 11/30/1999
  1. Dane!

    As a ChillyThistle lurker, I want to join in wishing you the best Dane! Greatly enjoy your posts - always informative and interesting.
  2. Cams, Screws, Axes, Biners and a lot more

    In for the following if still avail petsl ice screw racking biners (2) v thread tools w/hex wrench end quarks (if others fall through) bd roll up ice screw bag (1) bd 16cm new-style screw (3) charlet ice leash (2)
  3. PM sent on Venoms. Also, put me in line for screws if others fall through... LOL
  4. Mountaineering Boots

    AAI did in fact strongly recommend plastics, but for early or late season climbs. Having gone through several days of constant wet wx on an early season guided (AAI) Baker class, I can attest to the wisdom of plastic boots for multi-day trips in (likely) inclement weather - totally different than a day or overnight peag-bagging attempt. On day 5 of standing in wet snow and/or rain, it was very comforting to be able to dry the liners out. I'll also highly recommend the Scarpa Alpha (or newer version, the Omega) as a much more "nimble" alternative to the Inverno.
  5. Ingraham Direct on Sunday thru Wed?

    Noobishly, I didn't interpret it that way at all. I wear seatbelts, rope up, wear helmets... But it they're all worthless if I start thinking that I can step a little too close to the fire, just because I have those backups.
  6. Ingraham Direct on Sunday thru Wed?

    That's an interesting comment. A couple of weeks ago, one of our group asked a guide what he though of wearing Avalungs etc. He replied that yes, it's all good, but also that anyone who is looking down a slope and thinking they NEED the gear, has already made the first (and possibly fatal) mistake in judgment.
  7. Rainier Avalanche

    Dane, maybe I'm an exception to the rule and hopefully it's the result of having other (non-snow/alpine) climbing experience, but I would never assume that a summit is guaranteed. If nothing else, as an "old guy" I know better than to think that the mountains always deliver - guide or no guide. If we're talking specifically about guided summit trips and folks with near-zero mountain experiences, then I can see how the pressure might be pretty intense on guides to deliver the experience. I don't envy the guide services and schools. OTOH, for someone with limited time and not living near such mountain ranges, a "school" was an excellent vehicle for acquiring some essential glacier skills. Anyway, I just wanted to comment on my experience - and it's true that I was on a different peak, and under diff circumstances. YMMV...
  8. Rainier Avalanche

    American Alpine Institute
  9. Rainier Avalanche

    Having just spent a week with AAI on Mt.Baker I can add this: It's true that for a noob, though very disappointing not to summit (we did not due to the difficult conditions and avy danger), it is indeed a rush just to get onto the mountain and receive an intro into glacier travel and skills which will hopefully translate into safe and successful summit bid on the next trip (with or w/out guide services). In AAI's case, we were offered their "second summit" option if we wanted to try again, which means could sign up for the minimum 3-day Baker summit trip for 1/2 price. It seemed very clear that safety was the primary concern and at no time did we see our guide suggest that we should push the safety "envelope" in order to bag the summit.
  10. getting to Mount Baker

    I'm told that www.airporter.com shuttle would get you to Bellingham if that helps.
  11. Light summer belay/overnight jacket

    I picked one up a couple of weeks (months?) when they first went on sale. Unfortunately, the season was already over (here in mid-Atlantic) so I can't speak to experience. I can say that it appears to be very nicely thought out and well made. It also has a BIG hood (I hate wimpy hoods that don't work with helmets) which is great! It is bulkier than I'm used to (I've never owned a poly puffy, only down). My only other real "concern" is the one way zipper. I'm on the short side (5'7") and wear a medium. It's cut *relatively* long and I'm not sure if it's going to get in way of access to harness/ATC when I actually get around to using it as a belay jacket. I'll know more in two weeks when I'm headed Baker way...
  12. Black Diamond Couloir Harness?

    Holy shite! 145 buckaroos!! Arc'T stuff is nice, so I'm suure it's worth it, but sheesh... Anyway, what's sketch about the BD harness? I'm guessing it's not as comfy to hang in, but looks like a great upgrade to the Alpine Bod.
  13. Fit enough?

    Suggestions for descent training (other than actual climbs)?
  14. Mt.Baker late may - down or primaloft puffy?

    Got it. Will watch wx and make call closer to travel dates. Thank you kindly...all.
  15. Mt.Baker late may - down or primaloft puffy?

    Easton (I presume) AAI noob course. Suspect there'll be some standing around taking turns watching folks z-haul... Im new to glacier travel/camping and the Cascades in general (have backpacked one fall there). Thus the noob question. I hate heavy and i'll be humping a larger load than i'm used to anyway. So down layer is attractive in terms of bulk and weight.
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