Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
KitCatherine

How to get started

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

 

I have been reading here for a few months, and have no intentions to climb THIS upcoming year, but to prepare myself for climbing, and understanding.

 

A little bit about myself (introductions seem a good thing). I am a 26 year old female, and I recently lost 45 lbs, bringing my weight to 130(Just a little proud of that). To me, losing that extra weight was a step in the right direction towards getting myself FIT to learn climbing. In junior high and high school, I would rock climb at indoor facilities, but that was back in Seattle. At that time, I had also learned basic orienteering, which I will definately need to refresh.

 

I now reside in Spokane with my husband, and I guess we don't really know WHERE to start. I keep reading that REI is not the place to buy supplies. For those of you in Spokane, what do you recommend? I have also yet to find a training facility to LEARN how to climb in this area. It may be becuase of my ignorance, but I want to learn, and learn correctly.

 

I would also like advice on PHYSICAL training. I know that the better shape you are in, the more enjoyable a climb is. What are some suggested training methods? I asked my gym, and they just looked at me funny. Apparently, climbing is not often "trained for" openly, or at least these trainers did not understand what was needed. I am not entirely sure either.

 

I just want to learn properly, and learn the best I can, to be prepared for a first climb. I have given myself a year to get more physically fit to be able to do this. So, any advice, ideas, etc, is appreciated. Being a newbie, I want to learn and be prepared.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a copy of Freedom of the Hills. It's a great reference.

 

Trail running with lots of hills is a good way to get/stay in shape. So is cycling...again hills. Do this 3-4 times/week for at least an hour. When you have time load up a pack with some weight and go for a long hike. All this will give you a great base to begin the more technical aspects of climbing.

 

Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reference for the books.

 

I have to ask, what is wrong with Spokane Mountaineers? I don't know anything about them, so I don't know.

 

How about a good supply shop in Eastern Wa?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kit, If you could swing it I would urge that you make a treat to yourself (or have the hubby get you another one) of climbing now.

 

It is a common misperception that you need to be fit to climb. Go do a little, meet some folks and have fun. At the entry level you will be at fitness is really not required. Once you start you will find your type of climbing and develop your own goals. The fitness will follow.

 

Just don't put off the dream "until I am ready." Part of climbing is realizing the joy of living with no regrets.

 

As others have already posted get some good info and hook up with some good mentors. There is quite a bit of learning but those leaders can help CYA while you catch the dream.

Edited by ketch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to add....cycling is something I enjoy, (I HATE RUNNING) and am in the market to buying a higher end bike in February, so that is something I can add.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you know, a lot of people say the best way to train for climbing is by climbing. Im not saying, go buy all your gear and get climbing now! Im just thinking that your year to "prepare" to start climbing could turn into 2, 3, 4....and before you know it your 80yrs old, wishing you had.

 

Contact the spokane mountaineers like folks suggested.

Look into places in your community that offer classes or clinics.

Get out and do some hiking on steeper terrain.

Read.

Talk to people who climb, ask questions, and find a good mentor.

Go do an overnight winter camping trip at a state park to get your feet wet.

Learn to ski (if you dont already).

Get out and do some snowshoeing.

Start looking at maps.

Make sure youre having fun!

 

I've been there...in that "wanting" stage. I was there too long. You can 'dive right in' as a way to 'prepare', all the while staying relatively 'safe' (abviously nothing we do in this life is safe).

 

Best of luck to you!

 

Go get em! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit, If you could swing it I would urge that you make a treat to yourself (or have the hubby get you another one) of climbing now.

 

It is a common misperception that you need to be fit to climb. Go do a little, meet some folks and have fun. At the entry level you will be at fitness is really not required. Once you start you will find your type of climbing and develop your own goals. The fitness will follow.

 

Just don't put off the dream "until I am ready." Part of climbing is realizing the joy of living with no regrets.

 

We have Mt. Spokane about 35 miles from where I live. We actually have never been up there, so maybe starting on a hike up there would be a good way? I guess what I am NOT learning is what supplies you need for an easy hike, and how to properly utilize them. I have hiked for all of my life, (not so much in Spokane) but growing up in the PNW, hiking was something we did in the Noth Cascades, Mt. Rainier, Mt. St. Helens, and Mt. Adams. So, hiking is something I feel comfortable with. I just am not sure how to switch to climbing on something easy and know what I am doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the reference for the books.

 

I have to ask, what is wrong with Spokane Mountaineers? I don't know anything about them, so I don't know.

 

How about a good supply shop in Eastern Wa?

 

Nothing is wrong with them, but lots of climbers for one reason or another find the club learning environment offensive. Sign up and enjoy yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you know, a lot of people say the best way to train for climbing is by climbing. Im not saying, go buy all your gear and get climbing now! Im just thinking that your year to "prepare" to start climbing could turn into 2, 3, 4....and before you know it your 80yrs old, wishing you had.

 

Contact the spokane mountaineers like folks suggested.

Look into places in your community that offer classes or clinics.

Get out and do some hiking on steeper terrain.

Read.

Talk to people who climb, ask questions, and find a good mentor.

Go do an overnight winter camping trip at a state park to get your feet wet.

Learn to ski (if you dont already).

Get out and do some snowshoeing.

Start looking at maps.

Make sure youre having fun!

 

I've been there...in that "wanting" stage. I was there too long. You can 'dive right in' as a way to 'prepare', all the while staying relatively 'safe' (abviously nothing we do in this life is safe).

 

Best of luck to you!

 

Go get em! :)

 

My goal for climbing was to start in June 2008. I finish my Masters Program at that time, and when you aren't taking out $20,000 in student loans a year, climbing is more financially affordable. Part of my goal for year 2007 is to learn more, and I should add in hiking in steeper terrain. I would also like to slowly start buying equipment. But, if REI isn't the place to go, those of you in Spokane, what do YOU recommend for supplies? I just Amazone'd that book and plan on purchasing it after the holidays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try Mountain Gear at 2002 N Division in Spokane. We stop by there almost every time on our way to the Canadian Rockies. They have a good selection of gear and a knowledgable staff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really! A coworker of mine calls them the "Devil Shop" when it comes to biking equipment, so I had ruled them out. Maybe I will stop in there next week and see what they can advise.

 

For those of you in the eastern washington area, if I were to embark on my first easy climb this year, any recommendations? I have been told Vantage is easy, but I need a First Timer's Climb. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vantage has plenty of easy user friendly climbs, but you will need someone with a little experience with you to put up the rope. Going somewhere like vantage will require very little in the way of specific training as there are many easy climbs there.

 

I would agree with everyone else and say just join mountaineers now, and start learning hands on (unless you already have friends who climb, then learn from them). If you don't like the group dynamic, you can always start doing your own thing after learning some basic skills. I'd also recommend picking up a copy of "Freedom of the Hills". It covers most of what you need to get started.

 

Now what can you tell us about chinchillas?

PPCBuffalo16Small.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Kit, i just left spokane and maybe can help with a few thoughts. first of all, way to go on the weight! that is great. but i would agree carolyn and say the sooner you can start climbing, the better. the only way you are going to know if you enjoy it, and want to get better is by actually getting your hands and feet on rock. as far as gear shops, i really like the guys at mountain wear ? i think it was called. it is on like division and nora, north of zips(best hangover cure ever!) they will be able to get you going for sure, are really nice to talk to , rent snow shoes from, etc. mountain goat has the high end gear too, and is down near the climbing gym, which might not be a terrible place to start meeting the locals too. i went to gonzaga, and you might be able to meet some folks to head up to minihaha with for some bouldering or whatnot. just head into the outdoors office during the day and introduce yourself, let them know what you want to do, meet some more people. as far as mt. spokane, get a topo, some snowshoes, head out there, park at the cross country ski area and head up, it is a great day trip for sure. go up the west side to avoid the skiers! (you might want to plan a bit more, but you have basic mountaineering, so you should be good, easy daytrip, great way to get outside)

in terms of rockclimbing, meeting like minded people to head you in the right direction is the right place to start, so good luck, and start as soon as you can, even if it is the gym in the wonderful easternwashington winter! oh, eastern has a pretty big outdoors department too for cheap rentals and trips i think you could probably go on. have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is an old running joke (of course I have forgotten most of it).. but something along the lines of,

 

to train for climbing:

 

Quit your job

run on a treadmill setup in a sauna,

take baths in a tub filled with ice cubes

use a rasp to file your fingernails

run up stairs with 100lbs in a poorly fitted pack

fall down said stairs

try to start a fire in the shower

try to light a match while standing in front of a fan set at high

put your fingers in a vice and tighten

wear the same underwear for two months

take all your money, put it into a pile in the center of your living room and light fire to it.

 

Do this a couple of times and you should be ready for climbing..

 

 

But to be serious, the best training for climbing is by climbing. Learn what your limits are and then try to push them just a little. Find a group of climbers in your area, and see what they have to offer. Find a mentor (probably the best), baring that take some classes that teach you basic safety practices. Try to team up with more experienced climbers whenever you can. Believe it or not, climbers are a fairly friendly group.

 

Pick up and read "Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills" (one of the first books on climbing that I read when I started 30+ years ago). Pick up copies of "Rock&Ice", "Climbing", or "Alpinist".

 

Find some copies of "Accidents in North America Mountaineering" which is published each year by the American Alpine Club. This is not for morbid curousity, but to learn from others, and to also prepare you for what can happen. As you get into climbing you will probably find most climbers that have been around long enough have had a friend or two that have died in the mountains.

 

Expect raw humor from climbers as well, you will probably learn whole new ways of swearing that would probably make a sailor blush.

 

Anyway.. take care, and remember that climbing is dangerous and that you are personally responsible for your own safety and the safety of your climbing partner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Now what can you tell us about chinchillas?

PPCBuffalo16Small.jpg

 

LMAO Well, plenty! Thats Buffalo Junior, a brown velvet male, who weighs 2lbs and I sent him to Judy Pede to put with some specific males.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow Social Work, eh! You probably already know hundreds of climbers already then, but just don't know it. You are probably the most valuable person who has joined this forum in years, except maybe for that Nodder person :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Books Books Books. Got it. Join Spokane Mountaineers. Got it. I had NO clue we had an indoor climbing gym in downtown Spokane. That would actually be a great way for me to get my husband started as well.

 

Maybe I will see about doing the Mt. Spokane Snowshoeing next month. I loved Snowshoeing. It would get me back in the feeling of why I enjoyed it so much. We were such avid hikers, because my father never felt it was safe for me to learn to climb.

 

Are the main clases through the club? From what i had been able to tell on their website, getting into classes for 2007 means you needed to be a member for 2006. Hmmmmm

 

Again, I am thanking you all! I know my lack of how to start is probably frustrating, and I have been learning terms via reading threads, but some things don't have a lot of discussion. Maybe this will spur other lurkers to join in.

 

Neither of us have any friends who climb, whatsoever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×