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catbirdseat

[TR] Enchantments Climbing- The Temple/ High Priest/ Prusik 6/4/2005

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Climb: Enchantments Climbing-The Temple/ High Priest/ Prusik

 

Date of Climb: 6/4/2005

 

Trip Report:

On Friday, James, Erin, Dawn and I hiked in to Tamarack Meadows via Nada Creek and set up camp on a nice knoll with views (7 hours). We then climbed The Temple (5 hours). That climb involved an ascent of a steep snow finger and a one pitch rock climb of a 5.6 slab protected by one ancient rusty 1/4 inch bolt. Neat summit with a great view. Back to camp by 6 pm. Snow was soft with occasional postholing to hips.

 

On Saturday, we cramponed on nice hard snow to High Priest and did the North Face route. It took 4 pitches even though the guide book says three (50 meter ropes)and we pretty much used all the rope on each pitch. Summit at noon. Bootied a lost belay device from one crack and a carabiner from another using a chock pick taped to a trekking pole. Exciting double rope rap to the descent gully. Found a rodent eaten green jacket that Erin brought back for a laugh.

 

Traversed below the south face of Prusik and climbed the West Ridge. Started at 2 pm and summit at 4 pm. Back to packs by 6 pm. Rather nasty slog back to camp with much postholing in soft snow. James showed good routefinding skills to get us back by 8:30 pm. Went to bed for a well-deserved sleep.

 

Woke up at 4 am to sound of snow on the tent. Pulled our boots inside and closed the door. A little snow had fallen on the ends of our sleeping bags. Dozed a little longer and then got up to a cold, wet camp. It was a very wet and soggy hike back. The wildflowers were incredible. I might have enjoyed them more if my pack weren't so heavy. Met a couple guys on the trail who had hiked in on Saturday to do Prusik and had to leave empty handed.

 

Lunch at Duck Boys and beers all around. Everyone agreed it was a fun and memorable climb. This was Erin's first alpine climb. For Dawn, it was her first alpine lead. For me it was my first alpine climb since last year when my buddy had his accident on Stuart.

 

On the ride back with Dawn, we got a flat tire under the Convention Center. Her crappy tire iron woundn't work, but I finally figured out how to get the nuts loose by bracing the iron on the jack and standing on the iron. Those f'ing mechanics and their air wrenches!

 

 

Gear Notes:

Crampons, Axe, Light Rack

 

Approach Notes:

Snow above 7,000 ft

 

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Edited by catbirdseat

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Ah, that must have been you guys we heard whooping it up Saturday morning when we were on Prusik. I assume you found the cordelette my friend Ben left around a belay horn mid-route.

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Figures you wait for me to move to the opposite side of the country to do this trip. Wish I could have been there. cry.gif

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Ah, that must have been you guys we heard whooping it up Saturday morning when we were on Prusik. I assume you found the cordelette my friend Ben left around a belay horn mid-route.
I found a bright yellow cordelette on the route. I bootied it. I couldn't figure out why it was left behind. It sort of looked like it was used to rappel, but I looked and couldn't find anything that looked like a burn mark on it. What's the story?

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I couldn't figure out why it was left behind.

 

I felt the same way. I had slung that horn for a belay and Ben somehow forgot to take the 20 FEET OF BRIGHT ORANGE CORD with him when he cleaned the next pitch. It would have been a pain to belay him back down the slab move to get it, so we just moved on. hahaha.gif

 

It's all yours now, CBS. wave.gif

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I got an e-mail from for more beta for Prusik. I figured I might as share what I wrote with everyone. [Yes, I know this info is all available elsewhere]

 

> *Do you have any specific recommendations as to what

> gear to bring?

>

> *How did you divide the climb up pitch-wise? 4

> pitches? or more to lessen

> drag? Which pitches are the easiest for our least

> experienced leader to do?

>

> *What is the snow situation up there? Will we need

> snowshoes or crampons for

> the approach? Should we haul our boots up the climb

> to use on the descent?

 

"If you approach from the Snow Lake trail, you will

need neither snowshoes nor crampons. We needed

crampons because there is more snow on the north

slopes (approach from Temple Basin). A modest rack to 2.5 inches is all that is required.

 

We did the climb in 4 pitches. Using a 50 meter rope

you need to scramble up part of the first pitch in

order to reach the nice belay ledge. From the Balance

Rock you scramble up a ways to a 5.2 hand crack where

you can see all the lichen rubbed off by boots. I

scrambled up this without protection and belayed my

partner up to the ledge (20 meters). If you have a 60

meter rope, this is unnecessary.

 

The second and third pitches can be combined if you

scramble up a bit before starting, or if you have a 60

meter rope. Rope drag can be a problem though. We

did it in two pitches with a belay on the "whaleback"

above the 5.7 slab. When you turn the corner, be sure

to place a directional piece to reduce rope drag.

 

After the traverse pitch, there is a fourth class

scramble up to the dihedral, which I didn't protect,

but then belayed my second up. I don't count that as

a pitch. The dihedral is protected by a #1.5 Friend.

I placed one, climbed up, placed a #8 nut, back

cleaned the friend, climbed up some more, placed it

again to protect the mantle move at the top.

 

If you are confident climbing in boots you can just

lead in boots. Most people prefer rock shoes because

of the 5.7 slab which some would say feels like 5.9, albeit one move. My partners brought their

boots, but I just did the little snow traverse in my

rock shoes. I didn't want to saddle my second with my

great big clod hoppers.

 

Here is a tip that will save you some time and trouble on the descent.

There are two places at the summit from which you can

rappel. The first is at the top of the chimney near

where you top out (chockstone). The other is further

to the east (bolts). Take the first, it will mean less

traversing on steep snow. I've done it both ways and

I can tell you the second way sucks (rockfall hazard).

The first rap option puts you back at the bottom of

the dihedral pitch. Either do a single rope rap and

downclimb the fourth class section, or a double to get

to the bottom of the fourth class part. Then scramble

down part way back towards the traverse. You may or

may not see a blue double runner with a quick link on

it (someone may have bootied it). Set your rap

station above a slab with boot track on it. A double

rope rap will get you down to a ledge large enough for

four people. Be sure to use an EDK knot rather than a

double fisherman, or you may not recover your rope.

Tie knots in the end, the ropes barely reach.

 

There is a rap station with numerous slings and a

large quicklink. From here do one more single rope rap

to the snow or preferrably a double rope rap will put

you further down on a rock where the snow isn't as

steep."

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Most people prefer rock shoes because

of the 5.7 slab which some would say feels like 5.9, albeit one move.

 

I think you mistyped 5.6 as 5.9 or were you high mushsmile.gif??????

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Nope, I did not. I've climbed many 5.9s in Darrington that were easier than that one move. You can call it what you like.

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call it 5.7+ then. Darrington is not the same granitic pluton as prusik, therefore, it feels different...plus that friction move has seen more feet then all the dtown 5.9 climbs combined

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whoa! talk about mico managing a little crag climb.
The guy who asked for the beta was a novice climber on his first trip to the Enchantments, okay? I was answering his specific questions.

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Micromanaging a 5.6 into a 5.9. How hard is the S Face route then - 15c?

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The other thing about that slab is Beckey describes it as unprotectable. That's from back in the olden days. You can build a 3-piece anchor at the base of the slab if you'd like, and one step above that, you can reach high and put a TCU (or probably small tricam) in an eyebrow.

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Do you have any pictures of which nubbin' my foot should be on while placing that cam?

 

Perhaps a topo of the slab?

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hey geniuses knock it off or spray in spray. cbs said the guy who asked was a novice climber. maybe y'all were bold and brave as novices but i'm sure there's more than a few that aren't. just b/c larry calls is it a crag doesn't mean some guy on his first "alpine" outing will feel the same. wankers, the whole lot of ya.

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hey geniuses knock it off or spray in spray. cbs said the guy who asked was a novice climber. maybe y'all were bold and brave as novices but i'm sure there's more than a few that aren't. just b/c larry calls is it a crag doesn't mean some guy on his first "alpine" outing will feel the same. wankers, the whole lot of ya.

thumbs_up.gif

If it is beneath you to talk about how to manage a route like the West Ridge, simply start your own thread about what a badass you are.

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Hey, I think it's all in good fun (at least my comment was, though I admit it was quite useless). I certainly don't want to diminish the serious nature of any alpine climb, and the beta, though elaborate, is a welcome addition to the archives of this site. So I apologize if it appeared I was talking down. I was not.

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thumbs_up.gif

 

my ire wasn't specifically aimed at you although that kind of spray could probably stay in spray (funny tho it was).

 

i just think it's wrong when a bunch of hardmen w/lots of alpine experience make fun of this type of post. there's plenty of climbers out there who have much limited repetoire. althought the best part of an alpine adventure is the adventure, i can understand some guy thinking "hey beckey says it's 5.7+ that could mean anything from 5.4 -5.9. I lead 5.8 pretty comfortably but...."

 

he alpine adventure makes it a little more daunting to screw up. i'm sure this novice is wanting to make sure he's choosing something he's capable of climbing safely. some folks are not as bold as others.

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Micromanaging a 5.6 into a 5.9. How hard is the S Face route then - 15c?

which one? mushsmile.gif

 

larry's comment is hardly spray....

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