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JasonG

Splitboard Mountaineering Question

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So . . .. I have had a Voile for about 4 years of so and really like it. But so far, I have mainly stuck to wintertime BC turns (using normal softboot snowboard bindings). Towards the end of last season I got a pair of plate bindings for it and started using my plastic mountaineering boots for some climb/ski combos. I found out that they pretty much suck for snowboarding, and it is hard on the boots. I also found out the the skins that come with the setup (not full length) don't normally stick real well when they get totally soaked in spring snow. So that leads me to two questions for those wise old BC types that might be perusing the site . . .

 

1. What is a good lightweight AT boot (I'm willing to pay for a good one with a thermo liner) that people would think would work for snowboarding? I'm thinking something that is fairly flexible by ski boot standards . . .

 

2. Fat skins that would work on twin tip boards. The waist width of the ski is around 150mm . . .. Or should I just re-glue my existing skins and hope for the best (they work fine under cold winter conditions)

 

Thanks for any and all advice!!!

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a. check out splitboard.com many of these questions can be raised/answered there.

b. for PMB's adding an ankle strap/highback to the bindings can help with control

c. put glop stopper on the skins to help repel water, and keep them inside your jacket on the way down, which will help keep them dry. (i think accension skins are superior to the voile tractor skins, better glue anyway)

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Boots - softies are fine for mid-winter/deep snow day trips, but, AT boots are ideal for longer spring-time traverses where you typically spend more time touring than riding. Any low-end model will do, since fwd lean & lateral sfiffness isn't as important for our mode of descent. My Scarpa Titans do me just fine (doubt they make those anymore though).

 

Skins - I use Burton skins on my Voile split...they hook on both tip & tail & appear to be far stickier than the Voile skins. They've never come off. Showcase in Whistler usually has a few pairs kicking around, in the event you're nearby...

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For climbing and boarding combo, I agree that plastice boots with the plate binding sucks. What I have used in the past is plastic boots in my soft boot bindings and that works pretty well, even using my leather boots. If you go the randonee boot route, I'll be curious to hear how it is. Any of you have experience with that setup. I also remember seeing some K2 hard snowbarding boot that looked like they would work well, and they would take a crampon.

 

As for the skins I need to get a new set, and was just going to repace the Voile ones they seem to work well, never had any problem with them not sticking to the board, if any thing, I think they are too sticky. I have had problems with snow balling on the skin, but I haven't tried gobstopper, I am sure it is the solution to that problem.

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The AT boot/Plate binding setup is a logical choice for those situations and conditions on the ascent where you need that extra bit of edging control...not to mention being able to "ski" those short downhill bits (with skins on).

 

AT boots will obviously never give you 100% of that forgiving and predictable feel you get with softies, but, they come close. For a more natural ride in AT's, set your stance closer together and farther back than you would for your area board and increase the angle on your front foot. Set buckles on first tooth and leave velcro/shin strap nice and loose. This setup is FAR better than the leather or plastic mountaineering boot in strap binding combo (too low on ankle). You'll get used to it in no time.

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I ride a Burton Split with PMB's and do fine. I've never ridden hard plates because I don't want to hike in with rigid boots. I'm going to switch to lightweight,metal strap bindings to add rigidity and will give feedback. The one thing I'm learning from this post is that I'm not alone with split boarding questions/concerns. Soft boots are the best to ride all conditions in but blow to hike any distance in.

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I disagree with Jlag, I have ridden plates for nearly all of my snowboarding years (over 15). Unless you are in the park the preform equally or better than soft boots for all mountain terrain and the BC. I used some old Koflach Valuga Light touring boots (redd with t cam buckles) for a long time, recently baught a new pair of Raichle hard boots. Backountry tour ski boots work very very will in plate bindings. Of note is that i am currently fabricating a baseplate for the Voile plates that are supposed to work with teleboots so I can use them on my standard non-split board when I go on trips and want to take tele skis and my board, but only one pair of boots. I will let you know how the fabrication turns out.

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I am newish to the Splitboarding game, but i have used my FLOW bindings with anything from Snowboarding boots, to hiking boots. I would think that you could put any type of boot in the FLOW bindings and get a solid result.

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I disagree with Jlag, I have ridden plates for nearly all of my snowboarding years (over 15). Unless you are in the park the preform equally or better than soft boots for all mountain terrain and the BC.

 

Hmmmmmm, Do you have really short feet or a super wide board? All plate binding set-ups I have seen require the angle to be so far forward it compromises stability. Definatley not the best stance for free-riding or BC riding. Unarguably the best on hardpack/ice however.

 

Have had no problem with my Voile skins sticking. I have also found that my 159"x2.4" track makes short work of those longer deeper approaches, no "balling" or "sticking" issues.

 

When is Glissade gonna come out with a split board?!?

 

bigdrink.gif

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the placement of the boot forward or rear of the board tip has nothing to do with the binding. As far as the angle of the stance (which is what I assume you mean), plate riders usually have a high degree of forward angle esspeciall on the back foot, which allows the back knee to be driven hard forward for a supirior flex on a hard board to make tight and responsive carves on hardpack and ice. If you have a regular board and new hard boots you should be able to ride any stance. I just got back from Alaska and I saw a dude riding with a slight duckfoot stance with hard plates and hard boots. He was rippin.

 

I also finished my mods to my binding to accomidate telemark boots. I didn't like the ride in the teleboots at all. I had a lot of heel lift and a blister. Probably because my teleboots only have two buckles, one over the toe and one over the shin. I think that a three buckle boot with a strap inbetween the toe and shin would solve this problem.

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