Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Michael Telstad

[TR] Mount Goode - Megalodon Ridge 07/19/2021

Recommended Posts

Trip: Mount Goode - Megalodon Ridge

Trip Date: 07/19/2021

Trip Report:

“Hey bear!” I shout, followed by a convincing monkey call from Sean. We are only a couple hundred yards away from the trail, but swallowed deep in the eight foot tall slide alder of the North Fork of Bridge Creek. Maybe we’re off route, maybe there is no route. 

IMG_4585.thumb.jpg.050d16e47483ddecb01d5f7d551d8bde.jpg

A couple days prior Sean and I had been throwing around ideas for the weekend. Sean was interested in something hard on CBR, while I was craving some choss and adventure. Being the great friend and partner that he is, Sean agreed to my idea of Goode, and adjusted his schedule to fit mine. 

Meeting at the parking lot on Sunday, I ask Sean how comfortable he is soloing most of the ridge. He’s psyched on the idea, and I’m psyched to slim down the rack. I ditch the 4 and a few other pieces. With that I grab a couple bubbly waters to stash in a creek along the way and we’re off. In classic fashion, Sean takes off jogging almost immediately, it feels so good to be moving.

The hiking flies by and we soon find ourselves stumbling down an alder infested hillside down to Bridge Creek. With no obvious entry point on the other side, we start hiking upstream along the river bank until the alder overtakes us, and we’re forced to wade up stream in the biting glacier melt water. Just in time for my feet to go fully numb, I find a narrow tunnel through the brush and out of the river. After a brief bout of screaming barfies we’re off and moving again. From this point, things got a little weird. All previous reports of this route seemed intentionally vague about how to gain the ridge. The alpine basin that looked like steep meadows on the map proved to be alder choked waterfalls. After re-reading Dan’s TR, I’m pretty sure we cut up the hill too early and endured some hellish bushwacking. Following the waterfall a little further seems like a better idea. 

IMG_9378.thumb.jpg.310b513454314f03280f04626f6a1985.jpg

P1033664.thumb.JPG.d5d6ef150576a19f066c39d2f1ca26d4.JPG

Once re-birthed from the thicket, we followed a loose low 5th class gully up to the ridge crest. Freedom at last! The trudge up the treed ridge felt like it went on for eternity. Every roll, followed by another buttress and so on. 

P1033681.thumb.JPG.dbbf247976c42d69bb43a41723165954.JPG

P1033702.thumb.JPG.657f950375ebb533239c3a45c38691c8.JPG

It was at this point in the day that the true enormity of Jens and Dan’s single push effort set in. We were tired, and the idea of continuing up the ridge did not appeal. Maybe with tiny packs and perfect approach beta, but even then... As we tucked in for the night, a small plane flew circles around the summit. I assumed it could only be John Scurlock.

P1033723.thumb.JPG.bfec5f22368c3f87f2163aefd0ac0b6f.JPG

P1033726.thumb.JPG.ea5414b3d501d3211ac2bbaeeffc7925.JPG

After a nice night nestled into a bed of heather, we woke with the sun and enjoyed a warm pot of coffee to start the day. The initial part of the ridge proper was phenomenal. Highly textured white stone flowed up the mountain in a stunning spine feature. This section up to the first point would be a classic route on it’s own. I can not overstate how good the rock was through this section. Just perfect scrambling.

IMG_9392.thumb.jpg.d881d97294421cdfac127d2d75e84e22.jpg

IMG_4592.thumb.jpg.dd71822f2621bae7d3134df893dc15b1.jpg

Now atop point 8200, a cold wind ripped from the shady south side, adding to the intimidation of the ominous drop off ahead. Rather than onsight down-solo into the abyss, we opted to rope up here and simul down to the notch. This section did not boast the same quality rock, but made for comfortable down climbing with adequate protection. Once down, we again unroped and began back up to SE peak. Scrambling across this ridge was an incredible experience. I found myself falling into a flow state unlike much other. The climbing isn’t too hard, nor very sustained, so you are really able to enjoy the movement.

IMG_4595.thumb.jpg.2c48625199eda75acefed478735c15b2.jpg

IMG_4597.thumb.jpg.ed764c49e089ab0c942a234d9bf7ccab.jpg

P1033741.thumb.JPG.168820fc9b40087e2748289586c76bdc.JPG

Finally below the headwall, we roped up again. I lead a long somewhat loose and scary pitch of 5.9 slightly to the right of the FA party’s route. It went, but I can’t say I recommend it. Sean then took the lead, and after bailing on a N-side option, led an incredible 55m pitch up and left through splitter corners and up a striking arete feature. This pitch onward is definitely the same route that the FA party took. The last ~70m pitch took me up a very poorly protected arete composed of brick sized loose blocks up onto the ridge. As Blake says, “no lifeguard on duty here”.

P1033759.thumb.JPG.419a79efb02c941c2fa743e71232db3f.JPG

Sean questing the wrong way.

IMG_9406.thumb.jpg.597d957e3f179f346cf4658c447b6c1c.jpg

Now with the biggest obstacle behind us, we basked in the sun before unroping and scrambling down to the snow patch, and top of the ski line. Things had gone very smoothly up to this point, so we took our time hanging out and brewing up. Sitting there looking at the steep grey ice, and rotten gendarmes was making me nervous. We only had one chintzy light axe between the two of us and no crampons. If there wasn’t a way around, we would be in a pretty bad spot. As we scampered further up the ridge, I theorized how we could dead-man some rocks to rap down the snow and swing over to the other side. Once over the ridge, I was relieved to find a casual (albeit shitty) scree slope taking us around the back side.

IMG_4608.thumb.jpg.343108b637c51c52b44a9c7b25bab150.jpg

IMG_9407.thumb.jpg.143357c375f32902dd342f3ddad80ee1.jpg

More scrambling took us through looser and more convoluted gendarmes up towards the Black Tooth notch. Roping up one last time, I lead down and around the final gendarme into black tooth notch. I found this pitch to be easier than the proposed 5.10 grade, probably 5.8 or 5.9 and truly well protected. Maybe after 11 hours of FA questing with big packs this could feel like 10-. A short simul block took us to the summit and nap time!

IMG_9414.thumb.jpg.585fc68314a8fda5544a7905632cd701.jpg

IMG_4617.thumb.jpg.44ed67ff93abcfe96fd8d44759cf23b0.jpg

Having mentally prepared for an epic 12+ hour day, I was pleasantly surprised to arrive on the summit in the early afternoon with plenty of day to spare. We had full water bottles and a full seven hours to nap and enjoy the views. Life is Goode!

P1033826.thumb.JPG.0db18518f47023fafcc466e4adf4dac5.JPG

IMG_9418.thumb.jpg.7929ebd9a499956ea93be34e8d2d9301.jpg

P1033834.thumb.JPG.d70b1abb63cd4287d296bcc822504641.JPG

The descent sucked, and the hike out only sucked for the last hour.

IMG_4634.thumb.jpg.52001747a7d92a1aacce71ed40505080.jpg

IMG_9425.thumb.jpg.9eb03b0333310c5ecc8c833abb7e0f41.jpg

Too many good photos to share in this TR. Our full photo album can be found HERE

 

Gear Notes:
If Simuling/pitching out most of the ridge Double rack .1-2 Single 3&4. If scrambling all but the cruxes, a single rack .1-3 should be fine. Small cams in the .1-.2 range are most useful. Fish themed snacks.

Approach Notes:
IDK, try and gain the ridge as soon as possible? Follow the waterfall? Maybe someone who has done it right will chime in.
  • Like 5
  • Snaffled 1
  • Rawk on! 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations, that looks like it was fun. As one of the many folks who have only done the classic NE buttress route, I salute the adventurous nature of this outing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

You made even the shwack sound fun, nice work!

Edited by wayne
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fabulous! Will be good beta for those who are inspired to follow in your footsteps.

It's awesome that so much Cascades climbing 'history' was made within the past 20 years by people we know. Perhaps this is part of what inspires each new generation to get after it and add to the pantheon of new routes.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Super cool you guys! Yeah im sure that pitch into black tooth notch could be 5.9 or so and I think the tactic of soloing what you can is the way to climb this route. 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice send fellas. Wondered about this one.  Looks like a grand trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×