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careyjd

question Another Approach shoes and crampon thread

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Howdy everyone, got a question on approach shoes. I hope it’s not redundant or already been covered, i couldn’t find anything on it really. I’m torn on buying aluminum strap on crampons for my approach shoes. Camp xlc 490. I have an assortment of pons for my mountaineering boots when we do heavy alpine work, but I’m wanting something fast and light to use in case something quick comes up on a rock route on summer conditions, ie approach to the grand or on the exum ridge in summer where I would normally have approach and/or climbing shoes only or similar routes/objectives.  Yes, I will take my full shank boots and auto pons on the north ridge of baker, haha! My question is, I would love to up the ante a little and get the camp aluminum pons with the steel front points (xlc nanotech) but they only come in semi auto configuration. Does anyone have any tricks or experience with getting those puppies on an approach shoe?  I had the idea of buying both and attaching the green  back to the nanotechs,  but I’d have to drop 350 bucks!  Or are there other options for this weight weenie?  

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There is a reason they only come in this configuration.  It's pretty optimistic to think you'll be able to climb real ice with approach shoes.

Regular strap-on Al crampons work fine for anything less than actual water/glacial ice.  I like the longer points of Stubai ultralight universals, personally.

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I agree with Jason, you won't be front pointing anything in approach shoes so the nanotech's are probably a waste of $ for that purpose.

These work pretty well with stiffer approach shoes and fold up nicely for the 99% of the time you're carrying them in your pack for route's you've mentioned:

https://www.petzl.com/US/en/Sport/Crampons/LEOPARD-FL

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My set up for these situations is a pair of Scarpa Zens with strap-on  Black Diamond Nevés, and a Camp Corsa axe.  I hardly notice the weight.

 

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Yes, this was the info I was looking for. Thanks y’all, gonna ditch the semi auto idea and even the thought of  front pointing in approach shoes. 

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I have a pair of Grivel Air Tech Light aluminum crampons with universal binders.  They work great on approach shoes, mountaineering and ski boots.  The flexible bars and anti-bot plates are very nice.  One draw back is the points are short, which makes walking easy, but in certain snow conditions on glaciers they can be a bit dodgy.  

I have ice climbed with them a couple of times with Scarpa Charmoz boots, which have a stiff sole.   I used them to good effect on Shuksan's Fisher Chimneys in September, which had a couple of steep ice sections. The second time was the NW Face of the NR of Forbidden.  We had planned on climbing the NW Arete, but a storm the week prior had plastered wet, melting snow on the route.  The ice climbing, and it was ice, left my toes too bruised and swollen to put rock shoes on for the upper NR.  

After that experience I bought a pair of steel fronts for them for when I want a more performant crampon, but don't need a full on Petzl Sarken/Grivel G-14, etc.  This set up is very versatile and I feel good and wholesome using them for basic mountaineering.   

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