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Bill_Gates

Altimeter watches

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i don't even wanna ask how you monitor the temperature...

[laf][laf][laf]

 

[WHOA! HEY! MY FIRST PAGE TOP [Cool] ]

 

[ 11-01-2002, 09:34 AM: Message edited by: sayjay ]

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i'll give you a hint... you can write your name at the same time...we'll that all depends on how dehydrated you are... [Wink] hard for your piss to freeze when you are pissing tar... [big Grin][laf]

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I went through 3 Suunto Vector's and I am ready to return my Suunto Xlander due to heavy fogging on the display. The 3 Vector's problems ranged from fogging to the dial falling off. When they are working properly they are great, I just swap it out each time at Return Eq. Inc. and get a new one.

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If you are going to very high altitude, there is an explicable reason for inaccuracies with the Vector or any other altimeter (even the non-digital, classic, old school ones). I forget what the reason is, but there was an explanation of it in my instruction manual when I got mine. Might be worth reading before going to the Himalaya (or any other higher-than-continental-USA montanas).

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I've had a Casio Pathfinder for 6 months or so. It works okay as an altimeter, but it is awfully big and clunky, and more often than not, when I look at it, it's been bumped to the compass setting or something.

Also, it seems to change altitudes abruptly when driving; I've watched it sit at one altitude for a long time, then jump 500' at a go. I've never seen that sort of problem at climbing speeds, though.

And if you want a reasonably accurate reading, you do have to be prepared to calibrate it once or twice a day, but that's true of any barometer-type altimeter.

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quote:

Originally posted by RopeGunHooker:

 

Do you use it when you measure the altitude of the twinkie stand at 7-11 after you rob it? If you never gain any altitude how do you know it works?

Um, in the mountains? [Roll Eyes]

 

[ 11-04-2002, 08:27 PM: Message edited by: allison ]

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quote:

Originally posted by David Parker:

Really though, the suunto is ugly and way too bulky. Amazingly enough, my Casio (still working after 10 years)is extremely accurate and works as a depth gauge when diving too.

If you are talking about the black/yellow analog casio I agree! I had one and loved it for years but it mysteriously stopped working, leaving me with little choice but the Suunto. I loved that old one though, it looked cool too. Wish I could get mine fixed. Actually the problem was probably that I used it as a diving watch, and went too deep (it went on a couple >100ft dives).

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There needs to be an altimeter watch that just tells the altitude and isn't the size of a wall clock.

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I think perhaps my best option is to hire a guide that will not only tell me what direction we're going, but also what the elevation is. I don't mean to offend Mountaineering Guides but it seems their services are being paid for and I may as well take advantadge of this.

Maybe there will come a day when the standard watch contains GPS technology...

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quote:

Originally posted by allison:

Leave me alone, you little twink. I get out plenty.

I heard you get around plenty too. When's my turn or is this like Wheel of Fortune [laf]

 

Altimeter watches are great navigational tools. Along with a built in compass I have to say that the Suunto Vector has few problems from my use other than the battery has had a lot of changes.

 

[ 11-06-2002, 06:35 PM: Message edited by: RopeGunHooker ]

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quote:

Originally posted by allison:

I've had excellent luck with my Casio as well. Had it probably six years, nothing but battery changes until this summer when the watch guy had to spend five minutes cleaning the alti sensor.

 

Very accurate and reliable.

I have to agree with this sentiment. Casio's [rockband] They are accurate, durable, affordable, and arent huge or bulky. I have an older one (mine reads to 13,300) that has served me well. I would buy another one in an instant.

 

Cheers [big Drink]

 

Shawn

 

PS Yet another alternative is a geographical shift. In florida for example, the tallest land mass is only 300 feet above sea level. Not many altimeters sold in this phecking paradise... [Mad]

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quote:

I heard you get around plenty too. When's my turn or is this like Wheel of Fortune [laf]

uh oh...you are gettin a nasty PM... [laf][big Drink]

 

you [rockband]

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quote:

Originally posted by Alpine Tom:

I've had a Casio Pathfinder for 6 months or so. It works okay as an altimeter, but it is awfully big and clunky, and more often than not, when I look at it, it's been bumped to the compass setting or something.

Also, it seems to change altitudes abruptly when driving; I've watched it sit at one altitude for a long time, then jump 500' at a go. I've never seen that sort of problem at climbing speeds, though.

And if you want a reasonably accurate reading, you do have to be prepared to calibrate it once or twice a day, but that's true of any barometer-type altimeter.

The other problem with this watch is the band just sucks. It's fabric, thick enough to strap down loads on a semi, and maintains a perfectly circular shape, so it's not at all comfortable. I checked with Casio about the possibility of getting a replacement; they said "Unfortunately that was the only band Japan provided for the watch. It was designed specifically for the case."

I was just in NYC, and thought I could find a replacement there (where else?) but no luck either. It was kind of cool to watch the "apparent" altitude in the plane, though; it was pressurized to around 7600'

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so what do you guys think of altimeters, especially those ones found on watches? [Confused]

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If you are in Muir Hut will they tell you how high you are??? or do you need a LIST of instructions [Roll Eyes][laf]

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If you are in the muir hut you are probably smoking pot so you probably couldn't tell what the thing said even if you had the directions

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but you could entertain yourself by blowing on the gauge to see how low of an altitude you can record. this would be a great parlor game [Roll Eyes]

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