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Recommendations on Bivy Sacks?


SherpaJim
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With 2 rigid poles, at least eight staking points and snow banked around edges, it's gotta be as wind-stable as ANY tent on the market. Without the snow it's nearly as stable...

Yes, and that must be why you see so many Betamids pitched at the South Col on Everest. hahaha.gif

 

Any tent is wind stable, if you put enough work into building the campsite:

 

mckinley4.17.JPG

Edited by Stephen_Ramsey
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I must point out that MSR TP has eight stake points, plus ability to put four guys at mid-height, relatively heavy fabric, and the two peaks have loops, which can provide as many extra guylines as you like. "Giving" with gusts will only make life more miserable inside tent. Brits certainly used similar all through 1930s on N. side of Everest, earlier in Antarctic plateau, etc. etc..& never complained much. But actually, somehow, I can't believe I'd really want a tarp tent on McKinley or such, so maybe you're right. (but I wouldn't want just a biv sack either.)

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With 2 rigid poles, at least eight staking points and snow banked around edges, it's gotta be as wind-stable as ANY tent on the market. Without the snow it's nearly as stable...

Yes, and that must be why you see so many Betamids pitched at the South Col on Everest. hahaha.gif

 

Any tent is wind stable, if you put enough work into building the campsite:

 

mckinley4.17.JPG

Might as well build a freakin' snowcave and get it over with. Silly climbers. rolleyes.gif

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Brits certainly used similar all through 1930s on N. side of Everest, earlier in Antarctic plateau, etc. etc..& never complained much.

I'm guessing those tents were made from heavy canvas, and the poles were stout wood poles. I don't think this is so much a validation of the design, as it is of the strength of the materials that they used.

 

The fact that they didn't complain much is likely because they were British.

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I have the REI bivy, it is super-light, but not good in the rain. I've used it around 10 times now, and all but two or three times I got rained on. wazzup.gif The face area is just bug mesh, so if you're short you can kind of wrap some of the shell material over your head, but your head still gets wet eventually. Water also seems to pass through the zipper quite easily, and your bag gets wet. But it is a lot better than nothing, obviously, and these problems only occur when it rains continuously for a long time. For light rain and everything else it works alright. It's also cheap.

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I have the OR Deluxe bivy and like it a lot. Sure it is a little harder to get into than the other types that open on the side like a sleeping bag but the weight savings is worth it. It weighs 24.6 oz with the pole and stuff sac (weighed it myself). I don't think there is any other poled bivy that is lighter. Its pretty roomy and obviously completely waterproof (goretex XCR).

 

Another advantage of a bivy that hasn't been mentioned yet is that with the 'roof' down you are sleeping outside. If the wind kicks up or it starts raining, its very easy to close. You can't enjoy the stars as well from in a tent. I like sleeping in a bivy, just not on the snow.

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