Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
moonrover

Flying to Kathmandu

Recommended Posts

Yo peeps. I've been thinking about trekking in Nepal in the coming months and can get a super cheap flight to any of the following cities: Bangkok, Beijing, Shanghai, Tokyo, Osaka, Hong Kong, Singapore, or Peking. Have any of you flown to Kathmandu and gone through these cities? Anybody know which would be the cheaper connection, or be so fascinating that I MUST stop there if possible? Any help appreciated, as well as any tips for Nepal / SE Asia. Am planning to mainly trek (being a long trip I won't be able to carry all my climbing gear - hopefully I can find some cheap stuff there if I get the urge). Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Isn't the political situation in Nepal kinna messed up right now?

Nah, having all telephone lines to the outside world severed by the king is the sign of a stable democracy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Standard flight to KTM is through BKK (Bangkok). There is a ton of stuff to do during a stopover in Thailand or Singapore. Try to take a week or two if you can. You won't regret it. PM me if you have any specific questions about what to do there, I just returned from there (pre-tsunami).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All that political non-sense if over rated and over hyped by the media. I wouldn't let that stop me from going (and I'm not). Millions of people are getting along just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just did a little Googling around, and the King cut off phone service last weekend again. The State Department website is way out of date on things, but news articles would indicate the country is in some pretty serious turmoil right now. Besides the king stifling democracy, there are insurgent uprisings and the US Gov't is not happy about the harboring of terrorists. It looks like the possibility of civil war and/or a closing of the US Embassy, and/or some kind of military action on the part of the US gov't might be pretty real possibilities.

 

But you probably already know all of this if you are planning to go in the next couple of months. At the very least, it might not be a bad idea to register with the Embassy over there so at least they know you are there, should things go even more sideways. Seems like a tough time to go there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

February 2, 2005 State Department Warning

Economist Backgrounder

 

Lonely Planet Warning

 

It may be overhyped, I dunno. For your above question India and Thailand suspended flights to Nepal. Given how fluid the situation seems to be I decided to look at other destinations. Try the Lonely Planet's Thorn Tree forum; there's recent information there that's much more current than what you'll find here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I spent the month of November in the Khumbu.

We went through BKK and flew Thai airways (highly recommended), and visited some southern beaches just before all hell broke loose. Nepal and KTM felt really safe, we only had a few tense run ins with Maoists on the trail (on the section from Jiri to Lukla). We paid our "donation" and were on our way . . . From what I gather, things are not terribly different today. This is the best website I've found for up to the minute information:

 

http://www.raonline.ch/pages/story/np_mao0c.html

 

Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My highly opinionated take on the situation: In a general sense, one who needs to ask advice about cheap airfares on a climbing website should probably stay clear of revolutions in progress. On the other hand, your status as a wealthy (relative to local standards), American, noncombatant tourist will usually protect you. Besides, with certain notable exceptions, civil wars are sporadic in nature: bits of fighting here and there, incidents of sabotage etc., interspersed with life more or less as usual. Local people adjust to circumstances and get by as best they can. If you're flexible, so can you.

 

Think: localized shortages of essential commodities; disruptions in transport and commercial activities; extortion by Maoists, police, soldiers, and opportunists; breakdowns in communication infrastructure. This could be great fun for you, the tourist, or a major threat to your life and limb—depending on your skill at negotiating these sorts of situations and your dumb luck. Are you ready to go hungry from time to time, talk your way through roadblocks manned by teenagers with AK-47's, keep an ear to the ground and adjust plans accordingly, suffer periods of exceptional boredom, and be satisfied in the absence of phone/email/post contact with the folks at home? If so, it's a nice country with good people, trekking and scenery, and they'll be happy to see you. If not, well, assess your risk tolerance and roll the dice. Most likely you'll be fine.

 

Hope that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Gokyo Valley/Khumbu Valley trek is very beautiful. Allow 18+ days.

 

Is this doable in early December? I have about 3 weeks off after thanksgiving and am thinking of either heading to nepal, or to south america. I would prefer nepal if its not too late in the season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am going on Oct. 2 tokyo to bangkok to kathmandu..that is the best way to do it. words straight from the mouth of a close family friend who has been living there since 75. i went last summer to nepal and and now going back this fall to trek/work.

 

as for the political situation:

the maoists have just annouced a 90 day cease fire. soo thats good for the upcoming trekking/climbing season. dont let the maoist detract you from going....if you have a tourist visa they wont touch you (in theory) and just carry some cash on you so if you do get stopped by them you can give them the cash as a "donation" and say its all you have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, we did it in December and pick off Island Peak too. December is pretty dry in comparison to October.

 

Did you go through a guide service? Do you have any reccommendations?

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as for the political situation:

the maoists have just annouced a 90 day cease fire. soo thats good for the upcoming trekking/climbing season. dont let the maoist detract you from going....if you have a tourist visa they wont touch you (in theory) and just carry some cash on you so if you do get stopped by them you can give them the cash as a "donation" and say its all you have.

It's not the Maoists right now, its the mass protests and arrests in Kathmandu.

 

Anyone have a rec for a 2 week or slightly less trek?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, we did it in December and pick off Island Peak too. December is pretty dry in comparison to October.

 

Did you go through a guide service? Do you have any reccommendations?

 

Thanks.

 

We did not go through a guide service but had ran into a Sherpa Neima Tenzing who has one at REI (he is mentioned in Everest the West Ridge and knw RFK Unsold and big Jim) and brought him some thermous water bottles. He refered us to a guide who hired a few porters (they later ran off at night). We did not have a permit for the peak but things were pretty loose outside the towns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×