Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Jim

Torre Principal, Baralochie - route question

Recommended Posts

I'm conducting some research for a book.   I climbed the normal (10a) route back in 1995.   At that time on the final headwall there was an aid system - about 1 foot-long pieces of rebar stuck out, glued into holes, so that if you could not manage the 10a you could yard up on the very widely spaced rebar.  If I remember correctly, there were limited bolts so you also could sling the rebar.  This section may be harder than the 10a part of the final pitch, my memory is getting fuzzy.

I've searched around and have not found any information about this.  Recent trip reports make no mention of the rebar so I assume these have been cut and it appears additional bolts were added for safety.

Does anyone know if there were put up on the first ascent?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that was quick - thanks.

 

The original summit route ascended, finally, in 1943 after Pablo Fisher and Gustavo Kammerer overcame the final 40-foot slab guarding the summit. They initially spent an hour-and-a-half trying to throw an iron hook over the top, but eventually resorted to drilling seven one-inch metal rods- the holes of which are still visible as you climb past and clip the modern bolts protecting the steep, thin face.

 

  • Like 2
  • Rawk on! 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/5/2020 at 12:31 PM, Jim said:

Well, that was quick - thanks.

 

The original summit route ascended, finally, in 1943 after Pablo Fisher and Gustavo Kammerer overcame the final 40-foot slab guarding the summit. They initially spent an hour-and-a-half trying to throw an iron hook over the top, but eventually resorted to drilling seven one-inch metal rods- the holes of which are still visible as you climb past and clip the modern bolts protecting the steep, thin face.

 

17192161_10155150648004874_7689911053331614658_o.thumb.jpg.cebca13db831531bae0c6b9763757778.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice slab-climbing photo! Two seconds on belay at once, love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×