Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   11/10/22

      Help keep cascadeclimbers.com going!  Please consider donating so we can keep this site going.   We have set expenses right now but no revenue.  We do hope to getting a sponsor to help out, but for now we just need funds to upgrade the site and pay for hosting and licensing. See the "DONATE" tab in the top menu.
Sign in to follow this  
montypiton

pressure cooker?

Recommended Posts

back in the 70s and 80s, when I was making long (more than two weeks) trips and climbing "big", my pressure cooker was my best friend. even high on Denali and Aconcagua I ate real food. during the interim, while my kids grew up, the pressure cooker died. now that they're out of the house and I have the time/freedom/fantasy to go "long" and "big" again, I'm looking for another, & not finding. anybody know where I can find a "small" (like four quarts or less!?) light/compact (compared to other pressure cookers) pressure cooker these days?

-Haireball

Edited by montypiton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions! No sooner had I posted for help than I found the "east west usa" store - selling pressure cookers from India as small as two liters for under $50. I am officially excited!

-Haireball

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

surprise, surprise - will wonders never cease!?!?

 

In "Big Lots" the other day to buy a mattress for my college age son, and lo and behold in cookware, a 3-quart pressure cooker for $20! a bit heavier than I would have preferred, but for now I'll take it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

heavy if youre out three days or less- saves its weight in fuel on longer trips. cook whole grains, beans, split peas, lentils -- in 1982 I made split pea soup from scratch at 14k on Denali for a potluck with the medical project folks (first year of project -- think Peter Hackett, Brian Okonek) I carry it on longer trips, and at altitude, so that I can eat "real" food as opposed to freeze-dried "faux-food". try cooking noodles at 19000' on Aconcagua, where you can stir boiling water with your bare finger...

 

if all you do is boil water, the weight isn't worth it - except maybe at altitude when boiling water may not be hot enough to make even the freeze dried stuff palatable... of course this won't apply anywhere in the continental US... close to home its strictly for long trips and/or "luxury" trips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×