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ArchimedesDog

Easiest Hiking Summits

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Since I made an account, I might as well ask -- What are some easy hiking summits in the Cascades? I haul around a lot of camera equipment and am nursing bad knees, but would love to get up high this summer.

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These are my def of easy, YMMV...

Cascade Pass

Gothics with a nice view of Del Campo et al.

Vesper with good views to Big Four

Cutthroat Pass

Get into Fisher Basin, or get to Wing Lake under Black

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You can't go wrong with any of the old lookout peaks:

Sauk Mtn., Pilchuck, Winchester, Park Butte, Hidden Lakes Peak, etc.

Not all are physically easy, but all are non-technical.

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It is not a summit, but hiking camera gear to Sahale Glacier camp is good way to get some summit looking shots, in a rugged part of the range.

 

A few more to the excellent suggestions above (many are former LO peaks):

 

Hannegan Peak

Anderson Butte

Sourdough

Crater

Pugh

Mt. David

....

 

If you are willing to deal with a very benign glacier, I think the views from the summit of Ruth are perhaps some of the best, for the amount of effort expended.

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nobody went south for ya:

These aren't 'easy' so to speak, but groups of superfit run/jog them, throngs of average fit hike them, and decent numbers of small children, the unfit and the overweight get up them.

 

Mount St. Helens

South Sister (Oregon)

 

...requiring a fair bit more fitness, Mt. Adams, though going to Lunch Counter (~9,500ft) is fairly spectacular and only about a 3,500ft gain ~6mile round trip.

 

also could consider going up to Camp Muir on Rainier. And one of many subpeaks in the cascades thats pretty quick bang for buck:

http://www.nwhiker.com/GPNFHike02.html

 

No idea of your background/comfort on steepness/ice axe use/etc---so for novice i'd just recommend late summer when usually snow free (depending on snowpack..which is not doing well right now)

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Don't forget Silver Star, to which you can drive within 2 miles or so of the summit. It's the big ridge east of Battle Ground / Vancouver that offers spectacular views of Adams, Rainier, Hood, St. Helens, Jefferson, and Saddle Mountain (at the coast) on clear days. See my trip report here: Silver Star TR April 2013 However, I'd recommend the southern approach; saves you a mile and some elevation gain!

 

Also Saddle Mountain in Clatsop county!!

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Thanks, I used to be an advanced hiker but am now not in good shape. I've never been an ice-axe hiker but I lived in Minnesota much of my life so I'm probably somewhere above the level of the average beginner in comfort with ice.

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