Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   11/10/22

      Help keep cascadeclimbers.com going!  Please consider donating so we can keep this site going.   We have set expenses right now but no revenue.  We do hope to getting a sponsor to help out, but for now we just need funds to upgrade the site and pay for hosting and licensing. See the "DONATE" tab in the top menu.
Sign in to follow this  
1moremile

using rope for insulation beneath sleeping pad

Recommended Posts

I'm working on my cold weather camping skills (transitioning from day ice climb trips to overnighters). My following ? is in the context of use inside a 4 season tent (not an exposed forced bivy, nor a inside a snow shelter), where the ambient low temperature will likely be low enough below freezing such that anything items introduced into tent frozen would remain frozen (unless placed in sleeping bag):

Would it be beneficial to lay out a dry climbing rope in a flat pattern of bights on the tent floor, beneath the sleeping pad, for whatever insulation benefit it provides? If so, would it still be beneficial if the rope was partially wet/frozen from prior climbing use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My thought is the rope is going to be cold/wet/or frozen. I personally would not want to bring the rope in the tent for that reason. I would think that your body heat would eventually melt a frozen rope. Combining a light weight, 3/4 length Thermarest with a thin, full length Evazote pad is a popular combination for cold weather climbs.

 

 

Edited by DPS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like it would be uncomfortable and a pain in the ass. I always bring the rope in coiled and use it as a pillow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I consider the "rope for ground insulation" trick an "emergency" tactic for use only on forced bivouacs. In a tent or snow-shelter, the combo of evasote or ensolite under thermarest or equivalent is a tried and tested favorite. Personally, I prefer both pads at full-length when it's really cold. The few extra ounces are more than balanced out by the comfort they provide. Yeah, you can pad/insulate with ropes, packs, clothing, etc - I've found the compromised comfort usually overshadows the few ounces saved...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll second that. I've found the full-length pad to be worth the weight for me. I consider the energy saved by sleeping better outweighs the energy cost of hauling the extra 4-6 ounces.

 

And if you go with one of the new fat ultralight pads the weight difference is even less. Just be careful with it and bring a couple repair patches in case of crampon invasion! :grin:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your initial question seems to have the answer...do it! Do it you are yes going on a multi-day route where you will be on a small ledge, in a big col, chopping your platform, resting for a few mid route, it makes sense, and your initial idea of creating an insulation layer beneath an existing sleeping system are sound. Dead air space without circulation is insulation. Well done, you get it!

 

In the early days it was used to save both weight and volume in your pack and kit, however now that our gear is much lighter and compact than then you can still save weight and volume. You are already carrying the rope, it is your base that you place your other sleeping pad on top of, it is really quite comfortable. One rope a person.

 

Under all of your kit and utilized as the initial layer of insulation it will not get everything damp and wet. Use a bivi bag. You can always shake out the snow and frost prior to bringing it in, and it also helps to keep things less columnar on an a multi day.

 

My team and I would use it: in a tent, where after making our platform and getting the start of the tent up- the one most chilled would go inside and lay the rope one each sleeping spot- the other would guy out the tent; with bivi bags where everyone would lay out the rope at the bottom of their bivi bag, then place sleeping pad and gear on top rope, then crawl in bag; even in cabins and caves, as before; and again in when a forced bivi happened without pads.

 

We focused on first layering below the torso, then as much the hips and legs as possible. Your pack will work great for the legs and the other contents in silnyl bags will be good borders, and you will have enough stuff to make a pillow.

 

The primary thing for us aside from weight was to reduce volume, especially for climbing with your pack on technical ground. If we could head out with a 30-35L day pack for 2-3 days we were good!

 

Find your fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×