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olyclimber

Climbing related websites

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Hello Porter-

I will add www.TraditionalMountaineering.org and also

www.AlpineMountaineering.org

 

"Free basic to advanced alpine mountain climbing instruction"

 

 

MISSION

"To provide information and instruction about world-wide basic to advanced alpine mountain climbing safety skills and gear, and on and off trail hiking, scrambling and light and fast Leave No Trace backpacking techniques based on the foundation of an appreciation for the Stewardship of the Land, all illustrated through photographs and accounts of actual shared mountaineering adventures."

 

 

THE REASON

TraditionalMountaineering is founded on the premise that "He who knows naught, knows not that he knows naught", that exploring the hills and summitting peaks have dangers that are hidden to the un-informed and that these inherent risks can be in part, identified and mitigated by mentoring: information, training, wonderful gear, and knowledge gained through the experiences of others.

 

The value of TraditionalMountaineering to our Friends and Subscribers is the selectivity of the information we provide, and its relevance to introducing folks to informed hiking on the trail, exploring off the trail, mountain travel and Leave-no-Trace light-weight bivy and backpacking, technical travel over steep snow, rock and ice, technical glacier travel and a little technical rock climbing on the way to the summit. Whatever your capabilities and interests, there is a place for everyone in traditional alpine mountaineering.

 

--trad_guy

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The Ice Axe is on ebay, a young guy, really nice he is, is selling it, it's for sale right now......... this axe is pretty hard to get a hold of, I had to spend a pretty penny on one.. this ones only at 20 dallors.. dirt cheap. Mine, same one was over $500.00 used. :-/

 

My gawd, that is an old piece of shit MSR T-bird. I first thought that it may be a nice wooden shafted axe that showed care and craftsmanship in its construction. MSR axes were(are) very functional and strong, but certainly not an example of anything but Larry Penberthy's Rube Goldberg streak. To spend $500 on one is mind numbing, kind of like spending $20K on a Chevy Citation or a Gremlin. Maybe in 50 years that T-Bird will be worth some money, but now you seem worthy of the dupe of the year.

 

BTW, my general mountaineering axes are a MSR Sumner (1977), or a Forest axe ('80), that I would be happy to take a K for.

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Just started writing gear reviews of sorts and other climbing related topics:

 

http://www.examiner.com/x-18581-Portland-Climbing-Gear-Examiner

 

Then my photography that includes climbing but is not limited to climbing...

 

http://www.poultonimaging.com

 

As for the gear reviews. Any one with meaningful insight is welcome to shoot me a line with info that adds or worse, corrects something mentioned in a review.

 

Thanks

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Just a quick note about Carver:

 

- It is private property, you must sign a waiver at either the PRG or the Circuit

- Be extra respectful to the restaurant patrons and the Twilighters

- Clean-up any trash you find in the woods

- Pick-up after your dog

- Stay on the trails

 

And if an older guy asks to see your ID, he is the landowner. Be extra cool and thank him for letting us climb out there.

 

Edited by carverbouldering

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just like to add my blog to this list.. :-p

 

http://www.littlepo.com

 

I am a Seattle based climber, and I have many trip reports on my blog for various destinations. some articles might be interesting to China travelers - they are about climbing in Yangshuo China, Fumin Yunnan China, and other places in Taiwan/China etc. those might not be the most recent posts, please search the keywords.

 

 

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