Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
SCTrojan

Rainier for the novice

Recommended Posts

I was just wondering how impossible it would be for two climbers (like me and my friend) to climb Rainier with limited glacier experience? We have done some rope work on Mt. Hood's south side and we climbed Mt. Adams via southside. We are in great physical condition and skilled in wilderness travel and outdoors survival, we just lack technical mountaineering skills. Would it be possible to climb Rainier as a pair if we just brushed up on a few things or would that be suicide?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

of course you can climb rainier w/ little glacier experience, especially if you take rmi's dog route up the disappointment cleaver...but you're up shit's creek if something goes wrong and you don't know what the hell to do. there are monster crevasses up high. shit, if dan howwit could do it, then anybody can smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

seriously, i'd think it wise to at least be familiar w/ prusiking a rope, building a snow anchor, and rigging a series of pulleys to hoist a fallen climber

 

again though, sticking to the dog route provides a clear path that generally avoids cracks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of novices do it and survive. You'd be all right if you stayed on one of the two main routes and climbed in close proximity to other parties who could render aid if you got in trouble. I'd still recommend a rope team of three, rather than two.

 

Practice the following skills:

 

Ice Axe Arrest

Team Axe Arrest

Prusiking up a rope (garage rafters)

Building Snow Anchors

Rescue Pulley Setups

 

Go to Mt. Pilchuck or Paradise and actually practice this stuff until you can do it in your sleep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good points on being prepared for all possibilities. I would say make sure that you can atleast anchor a fallen partner, like Ivan said, and furthermore practice to assume you are the only one on the mountain.

Even on the dog route you can run into trouble. Rockfall in the cleaver and snow bridges failing up on the mountain.

I punched through with one leg on the dog route and looked down only to see the crevasse was huge below me and way overhung. Just space down below. Another time while on a snow block I stepped on it and it fell away crashing down this huge crevasse (jumped off it just in time). All I'm saying is that even if they put up a route don't assume it's totally safe.

TTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say: Don't climb the mountain if you are requiring another party's aid in case of accident. Isn't it mountain etiquette that if you can't take care of yourself, you have no business?!? (Although, it seems that people do it all the time)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What exactly are the "few things" that you feel you would brush up on?

And what exactly do you mean by "brush up"?

If it's just you and your partner on the mountain, and he goes in a hole, what exactly are you going to do?

If you don't know the "exactly" yet, don't go until you do. Duchess is right; it's bad etiquette at best. Really ugly at worst.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like everyone said, it's a walk-up until things go bad.

Crevasses, weather, AMS/HAPE/HACE....

 

How's your skill with crampons on modestly steep hard snow?

Not much room for mistakes in some places.

 

Now that you've slipped, how good are your self arrest skills? Are you practiced enough to do it right now?

 

Remember that accident on Hood? The one where a relatively inexperienced person fell, pulling the other members on the rope along, flossing-off more people on the way....

 

It was a bad day for a lot of people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should climb Ptarmigan Ridge if you don't have much experience. Then you won't have to worry about flossing others off their route or being rescued. Hire a guide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×