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summerprophet

Recomended Avalanche Books

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Allright, time to blow out the cobwebs a bit and use the old brain muscle.

 

Any recomendations for a current Avalanche awareness book? Looking for something more advanced than Freedom of the Hills, something with more detail of technical snowpack analysis.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Justin

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My favorite to date is: Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain by: Bruce Tremper, published by The Mountaineer Books in 2001. More technical 'snow science' then many of the others. Seems like it may meet your stated goals quite nicely, (it sure did mine).

 

For the Pacific Northwest maritime climate though, An Avalanche Manual for Backcountry Travel in the Pacific Northwest by Gary Brill is extraordinarily useful for our specific climatological conditions.

 

Gary Brill's Manual is the basis for Gary's Level I and II Avalanche classes. It may not be available unless you're a student in one of his classes however.

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"The Avalanche Handbook" is a very good resource. It's a lot more technical than some of the other books out there, but it is quite comprehensive. Some well respected university snow science and engineering programs use it as one of their text books.

Edited by sill

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+1 on Tremper's book. It's pretty much the bible. I think there's a new edition out that updates some of the science from the original.

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can anyonw elaborate more on the updates? im thinking about getting a new copy

 

I didn't notice much substantial changes from the 2st to the 2nd edition, but I'm not a microparser.

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Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain is excellent for it's use of pictures and diagrams to help defuse the large amounts of information being presented. I would say an excellent compliment to it is Snow Sense as well. It is a little bit more of a technical manual of sorts and really gets into the nitty gritty of snow science.

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Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain is excellent for it's use of pictures and diagrams to help defuse the large amounts of information being presented. I would say an excellent compliment to it is Snow Sense as well. It is a little bit more of a technical manual of sorts and really gets into the nitty gritty of snow science.

 

You are saying Staying Alive is more technical than Snow Sense, correct? Snow Sense is a waste for anyone of a lower 48 (excluding cascappalachia) literacy level.

 

If you want to geek out, read ISSW papers until your eyes bleed. Free Download link:

http://www.avtraining-admin.org/pubs/ISSW_Proceedings.pdf

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