Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
mike1

La Sportiva Nepal Evo GTX Boot

Recommended Posts

I wanted to refresh my previous thread "Leather 4-season mid-range boots" with a new topic. After researching boots, I've discovered that the Nepal Boot is pretty much the shit. Ya, they’re spendy, but my impression is that this will be a long lasting friend according to some of these previous comments: >link< I'm wondering if anyone else would like to add anything?

Thanks!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The old Nepal Top was such an awesome boot. When mine finally gave up the ghost, I was forced to check out a new pair of them fancy new 'Evo GTX'. But Sportiva has actually updated them in useful ways(lighter weight, trimmer fit) and they still seem to be a very bomber, reliable and sensitive 4-season leather.

 

There are way more nimble boots out there, definitely lighter ones available, and warmer ones too - but the Nepal Evo will climb anything that I can in the mountains and in any conditions. So it seems to be the one I'm using the most to bridge that gap between winter cragging and expedition climbing.

 

I know some A-team folks who use em on AK big rigs as well...but my toes are already just a little too numb to hazard that action.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just returned form the big city with my brand spanken new pair of Nepal Evos. I feel confident that I just invested in a great boot that will last. These boots seem to be made for winter alpine mountaineering in the Cascade, Olympic, Stuart mountains. Yippee!

 

Thanks to everyone for input!

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wore them to the summit of Aconcagua in the worst weather they have had this summer and some past summers. But my feet were a little cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How warm are they?

In NY we tend to either end up ice climbing in 40 F degree weather one day and then sub zero F degree the next day. Sometimes you get both weather in one day of climbing and plastics aren't the most comfy and versatile so I'm this month looking to update my Koflach Verts with these new popular GTX Nepal Evos. I just don't want to give up the warmth.

 

Everyone says they are the shit, but no one seems to have an agreement on how much "more warmer" they are than other leathers and how "less warmer" they are than double plastics?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't ever tried any of the "other leathers" but I will concur that the Nepal Evos are colder than plastics. That said I've climbed in down to about probably (I'm guessing) around 5 degrees farenheit and my toes did get a little cold during belays but nothing a little stamping around couldn't fix. I have a low volume foot and am happy to say, no blisters to date, hopefully I didn't just curse myself with that, but I have done some somewhat long (5 hour+/-) approach/deproaching in them. They are great for ice climbing, really flexible in the ankle. Also I climbed Mt. Adams in them. Just the steep snowy part where I needed crampons. Pretty comfy. They do seem to be the shit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Everyone says they are the shit, but no one seems to have an agreement on how much "more warmer" they are than other leathers and how "less warmer" they are than double plastics?

 

For someone so opinionated about gear you sure are clueless.

 

You cant standardized boot warmth because more than just the boots factor into how warm your feet are. What you wear on your core, socks, VBLs or no VBLs, what you eat (or didnt eat for breakfast), hydration levels, etc etc and so on all effect how effectively or ineffectively your body is able to get blood to the extremities.

 

The Nepal Tops/Evos are colder than plastics.

The Nepal Tops/Evos will be as warm as other leathers that have similar amounts of insulation (usually listed as XXXg of a synthetic)

 

Go to an ice festival and try the boots out. Problem solved.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×