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Kane

Sleeping Pads-Closed Cell and Self-Infating

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This is one of the last things I need for my trip. Just hoping to hear from you guys on what you think. Gotta have the combination, so I Was thinking ThermaRest Prolite 4, and a Z-Lite or Ridgerest. I know there are so many other pads out there, but should I just stick to this one? How is Insulmat?

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dude, go all out and hire a Sherpa to porter your cot and Duvet. Do it DAV Summit club style

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The problem I've found with Ridgerests and the other corrugated type pads is that when you invariable track snow into the tent, the snow ends up on the pad and is impossible to sweep off. It melts and you've got yourself an increasingly damp home. (I've seen a lot of folks use these though, so I'm probably just missing something...) The blue pads I've had seem to soak up water on their surface a bit.

 

As far as I'm concerned there's nothing more reliable, insulative, and lightweight for Alaska trips than the good old Evazote pads (Mr. Layton's "yellow hardman pad"). Throw an inflatable on top if you want more comfort.

 

Have a blast up there.

 

-Mark

 

 

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In the latest MEC catalogue i saw some thermarest-type mats that were filled with either down or a synthetic insulator. never tried this sort of mat, but seems like an interesting idea. anyone used them?

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The InsulMat Max-Thermo is a great inflatable with a bit of primaloft that has kept me warm while camping on snow at about 0(F). I ended up buying it because it packs down slightly smaller than my thermarest pro-lite 3! Yes, it’s heavier but with the insulation and the fact that it blows up to around 2” and is full length and packs really small and and and... I thought it was a worthy trade off for long cold routes where I wanted a small pack.

 

Anyway, if you want some more opinions, a search revealed:

http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Sleep%20Gear/Pads%20and%20Air%20Mattresses/Insul%20Mat%20Max-Thermo/

 

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But if it develops a leak/pops and you can't find/fix it, I guess you are sleeping on the rope and your backpack for the rest of the trip.

No thanks.

I'd bring a closed cell foam pad + a 3/4 length self-inflating for extra comfort if needed.

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I'd bring a closed cell foam pad + a 3/4 length self-inflating for extra comfort if needed.

 

YUP :tup:

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In the latest MEC catalogue i saw some thermarest-type mats that were filled with either down or a synthetic insulator. never tried this sort of mat, but seems like an interesting idea. anyone used them?

 

You have to pump them up with a stuff sack because guess what happens when you blow your moist breath into a mat filled with down - it gets wet! Yep, that's right.

 

These things are for hikers not for climbers. Right up there with the binoculars, titanium and rosewood folding chopsticks, and cotton print trekking dress.

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Dru is talking out of his ass!

 

I have an Exped Downmat, and it is awesome. I will never sleep on a thermarest again. I will use a ridge rest for light adventures and when sleeping on dry ground, but will almost exclusively use my downmat on snow (except maybe when carrying over or bivying on a technical route). The downmats are so much more comfortable than thermarests (I have had 4 or 5 thermarests up to prolite 4 to compare), it is unreal. You can sleep on your back, side, or stomach and be totally comfortable. Plus it feels like it adds 10 degrees to your bag. The Downmat 7 only weighs 4 oz more than a thermarest prolite 4(that is with stuff sack which makes a sweet pillow). Pumping them up sounds like a pain, but realistically takes less than 5 minutes.

 

Apparently this guy likes them too http://www.lyon.co.uk/outdoors/showitem.asp?Id=474

 

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I started using a 3/4 length Prolite 4 with a full length Z-Rest a few years back. Nothing has been better. If the Prolite leaks, you've still got a full length pad. Put the Z-Rest under the Prolite to keep any tracked in snow off you.

If I were to buy a Prolite today I'd go with the womens version. Higher R value for the same weight (just a tad shorter then the regular.......but its pink).

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The womens prolite 4's weigh the same because they are 5-6" shorter (66 and 72" lengths vs. 72 and 77").

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