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skeletor

Newbie question: Wax?

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Got a great deal on a new AT set-up, set of k2 8611s. My question is do I need to wax them first time out? Is there any difference in how you would wax an AT set up vs. a downhill ski?

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Make shure they are waxed well otherwise your skins will leave glue on them when you peel them off. You can take them in to the shop or use an old iron and a scraper at home. I just get parafin from the hardware store.

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Ptex is ptex. Structurally there is no difference between an AT ski and an alpine ski. Wax em as often as possible.

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Wax em as often as possible.

And there is a difference between paraffin and ski wax. Even the cheap stuff. So just by a big ole block of ski wax for not much.

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Ok, ok, sintered UHMW polyethelene is sintered UHMW polyethelene. Happy now?

nice man. I got to admit, I had no idea what bases were made out of. I just knew it wasnt p-tex.

 

as for being happy? no, we are still in a masssive snow drought. can you fix that too?

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Ok, ok, sintered UHMW polyethelene is sintered UHMW polyethelene. Happy now?

 

Not ALL base's are sintered. Many are extruded. Both are polyethelene. All start the process as extruded. Extruded base material is less expensive, softer , less durable has a lower molecular density (weight) and absorbs less wax. Sintered base material has a higher molelecular density (UHMW - ultra high molecular weight). It is more durable, absorbs wax better, is faster and more expensive.

As posted above, AT, Tele, Nordic and Alpine skis all have polyethelene bases. All require glide wax. Wax often. When using skins, don't scrape as much as you would for a lift served pair of skis. As mentioned previously, the wax helps keep the skin adhesive from coating the ski base.

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is it better to wax warm or cold?

 

edit-if you had no choice and had to go one way or the other...what is faster.

Edited by steepconcrete

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is it better to wax warm or cold?

 

edit-if you had no choice and had to go one way or the other...what is faster.

 

Cold or rub on wax is faster in that it takes less time to apply. Definately better than no wax at all. Hot wax is best because it allows the wax to be absorbed into the pores of the base material. It will last longer and glide faster. A broad spectrum temperature or universal wax is most suitable for recreational resort skiing and BC applications.

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thanks bdog.

 

I didnt word that well at all.

what I was trying to ask was-> say your using temp specific wax, the snow is 20 and you dont have the right temp range, one wax is too cold like a 10, and one is too warm at a 30. What wax goes faster, the one that is too warm or too cool for the snow?

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thanks bdog.

 

I didnt word that well at all.

what I was trying to ask was-> say your using temp specific wax, the snow is 20 and you dont have the right temp range, one wax is too cold like a 10, and one is too warm at a 30. What wax goes faster, the one that is too warm or too cool for the snow?

 

Cold wax is harder, so it is better to error on the side of colder wax. you can always apply a softer (warmer) wax on top of harder, but it does not work well to go harder on top of a layer of softer. For all practical purposes in recreational skiing it hardly matters. If you are off by 10 or even 20 degrees the difference in glide is measured in 10ths of a second. Wax on and point 'em down. laugh.gif

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Around here I doubt you'll notice a difference between universal wax and temp specifics. If you're in Montana at -40 you might want a cold wax. In the PNW? Universal will work fine.

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thanks boys

one more question that just came to mind, the blocks Im using are about 15 years old, does wax go bad?

Edited by steepconcrete

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thanks boys

one more question that just came to mind, the blocks Im using are about 15 years old, does wax go bad?

 

fifteen year old wax?!!!?? Dude, you need to ski more! yelrotflmao.gif

 

It should be fine really. Hydrocarbon wax dosn't loose much over the years.

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