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badvoodoo

Good book for multipitch beginners?

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The best one is "Care and Feeding of the Snafflehound" snaf.gif

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A good project which was mentioned in a previous post but not dealt with in depth is the idea of making a single pitch climb multi-pitch.

 

The way to do this is to pick a low fifth class climb that is about a hundred feet or so. Climb up ten feet or so and build an anchor, then bring your partner up. Lead out again, placing a piece or two of gear between you and your last belay and then build another anchor. Do this over and over and over again, making your one pitch climb multi-pitch.

 

There are a few rules of thumb for this kind of excercise:

 

1) The instructional books require three pieces for a trad anchor. My experience is that one out of every three pieces for a beginning leader is bad. As such you should build anchors with at least four pieces to start.

 

2) Be sure to place at least one piece between each of the belay stations, even if they are very close together. The last thing you want to do is to take a leader fall onto the previous belay station.

 

3) Be sure the route is well within your climbing ability. You do not want to be sketching out while worrying about gear and the like.

 

4) Doing all this with someone with a lot more experience or with a guide will likely keep you from making an unnecessary trip to the hospital.

 

On the question of multi-pitch sport climbing... There are not that many multi-pitch sport climbs out there that are appropriate for a beginning leader. As such, it would be better to start on easy trad ground...

 

In any case, good luck...!

 

Jason

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Muffy,

rope management is just something that needs practice. got to go out and climb more multipitch routes.

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Muffy,

rope management is just something that needs practice. got to go out and climb more multipitch routes.

 

what I need is someoome to create a system I can use and teach it to me. Just a simple system 'when this then this' type of thing.

 

I think I have to just treat the collums like a multi pitch climb.. and then I will deal with the rope more times each time I get out.

 

then I need to climb with Dru bigdrink.gif aparently fruit.gifcool.gif

Edited by Muffy_The_Wanker_Sprayer

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Muffy,

rope management is just something that needs practice. got to go out and climb more multipitch routes.

 

what I need is someoome to create a system I can use and teach it to me. Just a simple system 'when this then this' type of thing.

 

When there is slack, take it in. Make long butterfly loops over your tie-in as you take in rope; repeat as necessary until joined at your belay by the body tied to the other end of the rope. If it gets tangled, you'll die. wink.gif

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Muffy,

rope management is just something that needs practice. got to go out and climb more multipitch routes.

 

what I need is someoome to create a system I can use and teach it to me. Just a simple system 'when this then this' type of thing.

 

When there is slack, take it in. Make long butterfly loops over your tie-in as you take in rope; repeat as necessary until joined at your belay by the body tied to the other end of the rope. If it gets tangled, you'll die. wink.gif

tongue.gif thanks smart ass

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Muffy,

rope management is just something that needs practice. got to go out and climb more multipitch routes.

 

what I need is someoome to create a system I can use and teach it to me. Just a simple system 'when this then this' type of thing.

 

When there is slack, take it in. Make long butterfly loops over your tie-in as you take in rope; repeat as necessary until joined at your belay by the body tied to the other end of the rope. If it gets tangled, you'll die. wink.gif

tongue.gif thanks smart ass

 

Anytime. smirk.gif More advice: wear sunscreen, don't eat yellow snow, and be nice to old people.

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The way to do this is to pick a low fifth class climb that is about a hundred feet or so. Climb up ten feet or so and build an anchor, then bring your partner up. Lead out again, placing a piece or two of gear between you and your last belay and then build another anchor. Do this over and over and over again, making your one pitch climb multi-pitch.

 

Great advice!

 

On the question of multi-pitch sport climbing... There are not that many multi-pitch sport climbs out there that are appropriate for a beginning leader. As such, it would be better to start on easy trad ground...

 

If you climb at Flagstone, there is the 2 pitch 5.6 route by Toy Box (the route name escapes me - it's often referred to as a "bolt ladder"). That would be very appropriate for a first sport multipitch. There is also the second pitch of Bunny Face, but that maybe a little to sketchy for a totally green beginner because of the slight downclimb and traverse it takes to get onto the second pitch.

 

what I need is someoome to create a system I can use and teach it to me. Just a simple system 'when this then this' type of thing.

 

There was a tip and an illustration in this month's Climbing (I believe). You might find that helpful. It's been a while since I have done multipitch, but I never got rope management down very well either. I always seemed to turn the rope into a rat's nest.

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it's also important(when swapping leads) to know how to rack gear on a gear sling. some people like gear with biners facing in; or small cams inside, bigger stuff outside.

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i dont think reading a book about multipitch before you climb multipitch will help you anymore than reading a cookbook if you are hungry cheeburga_ron.gif

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i dont think reading a book about multipitch before you climb multipitch will help you anymore than reading a cookbook if you are hungry cheeburga_ron.gif

 

For sure - books and bulletin boards can be good sources of wisdom, but eventually, one must get off the couch and then apply said wisdom and learn for themselves in the mountains.

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If you climb at Flagstone, there is the 2 pitch 5.6 route by Toy Box (the route name escapes me - it's often referred to as a "bolt ladder"). That would be very appropriate for a first sport multipitch. There is also the second pitch of Bunny Face, but that maybe a little to sketchy for a totally green beginner because of the slight downclimb and traverse it takes to get onto the second pitch.

 

Thanks for the tips, Tyler, both about Flagstone and Columns. I am actually in Eugene, so I'll have to give those a try. thumbs_up.gif

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