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klenke

A BWR for an Obscure Peak

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lancegranite said:

white chuck is not in the stilly valley,but had a lookout no it.(also the WC river flows into the Sauk)

close?

 

The photo is not from White Chuck. Also my guess is incorrect but I am zeroing in on it. yellowsleep.gif

Edited by Cpt.Caveman

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this two syllable - #1 fish #2 body part clue from Stefan is not helping matters !!

 

even with my green Beckey open nothing seems to fit. unless its Finney? fish fin - knee?

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Dru said:

yeah i aided it!

 

Your answer should be correct. I think North Mountain is very near Finney. But North Mountain is NOT in the Beckey Guide. thumbs_up.gif

 

Aiders suck wazzup.gif

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OK, since we are on the topics of prominence, and the Finney, Gee, Round, Higgins area (aka "Loggers Island"), and quizzes, what is the peak with the greatest prominence in Skagit County? Is it something like Dome, Eldorado, Snowfield, or Buckner, the Skagit County High Point, or something more mundane?

 

For those not clued in to the prominence concept, it is the elevation difference between the summit of a peak and the lowest contour that encircles the peak, but no higher summit. If water were to rise to this encircling contour, it would cut the landform off as an island, and the elevation of the island would be the peak's prominence.

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I think I clued this in to Stefan after he told me about Gee Point: I'm going to say the peak you're talking about is Round Mountain (5,320 ft). Its prominence is about 4,800 ft and the saddle in question is adjacent to the town of Darrington. This saddle (approx. 520 feet) separates the northward flowing Sauk River on east and the westward flowing North Fork Stillaguamish River on the west. If Round Mountain were only 200 feet higher it would be much more famous to prominence afficianados since 5,000+ foot prominence peaks are not that common in the U.S.

 

Am I right, John? Is it Round Mountain?

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