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chelle

Question for the Physics/Medical Geeks

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nope sorry wouldn't... even if weather was constant, it would be different because of teh rotation of the planet... it forces a higher concentration of air at teh equator at teh expense of air nearer to teh poles...

 

 

BULL SHIT fruit.gif The earth surface is an oblate sphereoid but the tropospherre is thermally driven rotation of the earth has no effect

 

U stupid tard it helps if u know what the fawk you are talkin about... u are just sprayin bullshit and ignorance.... making yourself look dumber go back to the JD which is something u know about...or fat lituanian tractor pull girlz

the_finger.gifthe_finger.gifthe_finger.gif

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no effect

 

though i dont appreciate your harsh tone... i do believe you are wrong...

Earth rotates 'dragging' atmosphere with it imparting spin = "vorticity". Air moving relative to surface therefore often curves.

 

though the application is different, i do believe that the phenomenon is applicable in this instance...thoguth the troposphere is independently powered by thermal variations, the drag of the spin also effects this movement. i dont know to what degreem but certainly enough for you to be more than tact-less to jump on my ass... chill brah... and lithuanian women are not fat... quite the contrary... grin.gif take some zanex and abotu 12 beers and calm down cheif... bigdrink.gif

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Fence_Sitter said:

no effect

 

though i dont appreciate your harsh tone... i do believe you are wrong...

Earth rotates 'dragging' atmosphere with it imparting spin = "vorticity". Air moving relative to surface therefore often curves.

 

though the application is different, i do believe that the phenomenon is applicable in this instance...thoguth the troposphere is independently powered by thermal variations, the drag of the spin also effects this movement. i dont know to what degreem but certainly enough for you to be more than tact-less to jump on my ass... chill brah... and lithuanian women are not fat... quite the contrary... grin.gif take some zanex and abotu 12 beers and calm down cheif... bigdrink.gif

 

 

vorticity is not enuf to cause a difference in pressure at 20 000 it is a boundary layer phenomenon.... atmosphere is a sphere!!!! unlike the earth which does form oblate spheroid due to rotation...so actually atmosphere is thinner at sea level than at poles due to this effect...cancels out thermal fx....

 

damn you must be all peacable and shit tonight.... no boxing_smiley.gifboxing_smiley.gifboxing_smiley.gifboxing_smiley.gifboxing_smiley.gif ing yellaf.gif

 

even dissin your wide load lithuanian collective farm chicks in their dynamo riga jerseys had no effect! the_finger.gif

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Muffy_The_Wanker_Sprayer said:

unfortunatly you can't lose the bull shit wink.gif

 

hmm... mighty srong words for teh ditz who has neve met me... rolleyes.gif

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Mr._Natural said:

fence, your new bad boy image is hillfuckinglarious, please keep it up. hahaha.gif

 

what bad boy image? confused.gif whatchootalkinboutwillis? dru's da homeboy talking smack yo! i's just bein me wave.gif

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ehmmic said:

 

At sea level the difference during normal breathing between the pressure outside and inside the lungs is about 1mmHg. This is one component that helps with normal inhalation. Does this relationship hold at altitude?

 

I don't know the exact details, but there is a certain amount of pressure required within the lungs to assure that the oxygen exchange is happening in the alveoli through the thin capillaries. It is in these structures that blood and oxygen meet. If there isn't enough "back pressure" (like at altitude) blood and fluid can flow back into the lungs, which is probably how pulmonary edema happens. Our bodies were designed to operate most efficiently at sea level, give or take a few thousand feet elevation gain.

 

A similar but opposite effect happens in divers, who breathe air at great depths. Under the great pressures exerted by water, more gases can enter and dissolve in the bloodstream. Rising too fast (rapid depressurization)will cause the blood gases to rapidly liberate, (like popping the top off a can of beer liberates CO2) causing a potentially fatal case of "the bends".

 

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MounTAIN_Woman said:

ehmmic said:

 

At sea level the difference during normal breathing between the pressure outside and inside the lungs is about 1mmHg. This is one component that helps with normal inhalation. Does this relationship hold at altitude?

 

I don't know the exact details, but there is a certain amount of pressure required within the lungs to assure that the oxygen exchange is happening in the alveoli through the thin capillaries. It is in these structures that blood and oxygen meet. If there isn't enough "back pressure" (like at altitude) blood and fluid can flow back into the lungs, which is probably how pulmonary edema happens. Our bodies were designed to operate most efficiently at sea level, give or take a few thousand feet elevation gain.

 

A similar but opposite effect happens in divers, who breathe air at great depths. Under the great pressures exerted by water, more gases can enter and dissolve in the bloodstream. Rising too fast (rapid depressurization)will cause the blood gases to rapidly liberate, (like popping the top off a can of beer liberates CO2) causing a potentially fatal case of "the bends".

 

The PO2 of blood entering alveolar capillaries is around 40 mm Hg. The PO2 in the lungs is around 104 mm Hg. It's this pressure gradiant that drives oxygen from the atmosphere into the circulatory system.

 

Pulmonary edema has more to do with elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. A couple of different factors cause this, but the result is an imbalance in how the surface area of the lungs are ventilated (some more than others) and an overperfusion of some parts of the lung causing the localized edema.

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