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Dulton

Winter Routes on Shasta

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So what are some of the favorite winter routes on Shasta (not counting the Casaval Ridge route). Any beta on the routes would be sweet too!! Just wondering because im just curious and was thinking about a trip down there this winter.

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I can not speak for the winter but was down there early last May. IMHO, Shasta sucks and is not worth the drive. If you are interested in volcanoes there are a lot more interesting mountains and routes north of the California border. A buddy and I went down, set up camp at approx. 10,500. We got a real good look at the Chossaval Ridge, decided that there was nothing interesting about it (unless you like loose roock), packed our stuff up and drove to Smith Rock for a week of sun and Prana Mommas. By the way the guy at the mountaineering shop told us the route was in great shape. Our question was, if that is great, what is bad? Hood has lots of interesting winter routes and is a lot closer. If you do go, post a report, I would be interested to hear another opinion.

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the north side of Shasta is MUCH more interesting.. but very few people climb it... don't know why?

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the north side of Shasta is MUCH more interesting.. but very few people climb it... don't know why?

 

In winter I think the reason is generally access. The hike in is much longer than the standard ridge/gulch route when the road is closed. Other than that the only reason I can think of is that it is more technical, which is a bonus for someone with the skills because you'll likely have the whole route to yourself. I think in winter Shasta sees more skier traffic than climbers/skiers who want to get to the summit.

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Im not so much interested in walking along a ridge with loose rotten volcanic rock, me no likey! How is the north side of Shasta for some technical moves and how is the approach to get to the north side? pitty.gif

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I'm thinking of going up the Casaval Ridge or Sargents Ridge by myself. I realize it is boring to some of you, but it's a little exercise and altitude to me, and my buddies aren't free to go. Do you need to be roped up for either of those routes? Thanks in advance.

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Casaval is best in winter conditions as everything loose is covered/held in place. It should be pointed out (and you probably already know this) that generally one does not climb the actual ridge crest, but the moderate snow slopes underneath it. The north side is a nice contrast the packs that march the gulch; however you won't find much technical climbing. What kind of technicalities are looking for? Rock or snow? If you specify, perhaps the site can direct you towards something better.

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Casaval should be casual. NOLSe is right - you want a lot of snow on the route, but I did it alone July 4 on a good snow year, and the only issue was the ~60 mph wind that literally knocked me over on the summit plateau. I only took one tool, but had crampons. There were no holes, little (but some) rockfall. Go for it - a rope would only slow you down. Descend one of the snow gullies to the north of Casaval - they go very quickly.

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I'm thinking of going up the Casaval Ridge or Sargents Ridge by myself. I realize it is boring to some of you, but it's a little exercise and altitude to me, and my buddies aren't free to go. Do you need to be roped up for either of those routes? Thanks in advance.

This website has some good current route info: http://www.shastaavalanche.org/reports.htm

 

You probably don't need to rope up for either route (especially Sargents), although it really depends upon your skill/comfort level.

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