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Thudman

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About Thudman

  • Rank
    n00b
  • Birthday 06/23/1972

Converted

  • Occupation
    Scientist
  • Location
    In the Lab
  1. There are also places where bolts can protect the more "natural" environment (short of closing the crag). Some popular routes originally used trees as anchors and have since had bolt anchors placed. Gray bolts on gray rock are less visible than slings around trees and save the trees from further damage. A blanket bolting ban would prevent this kind of anchor.
  2. Five fingered shoe opinions?

    Nope. There must be other adherents. My feet aren't that tough, you'd have to slow down too much for the downhill. Mike, I agree that most of the "innovation" is marketing, but a few companies are getting the idea. I mostly run in the widest racing flats or spikeless cross-country shoes I can find. Ditching cushioned shoes and orthotics was the best thing I ever did for my knees and ankles. Unfortunately, our feet appear to have evolved for dry savannah. I could go for some nice cloven hooves for the mountains.
  3. Five fingered shoe opinions?

    OK, so I actually got a pair, 'cause running barefoot through downtown portland is a little sketchy. They are actually excellent for running. Basically, you very quickly learn how to run properly, using your arch as the shock absorber it evolved to be. I got them because pretty much every running shoe screws your stride up more than it helps. Sadly, after 30+ years of western culture shoes, I still only run <10K in them. Your lower legs get worked more, but it feels good. My knees get less achy from miles. They don't do well in mud and you have to watch your step on sharp basalt gravel.
  4. Katahdin Beta Request

    I remember reading that Messner and Haebeler got hassled by the rangers (i.e. need resumes and gear list plus an early start) to climb.
  5. Favorite Books on Climbing

    On the Ridge Between Life and Death by David Roberts
  6. ski boots suck

    OK, so I use tele boots, Garmont or Crispi are a little wider and a thermo helps. I've tried on a number of AT boots and found Lowa Structuras mighty comfy on my wide feet, right out of the box. You might even find some on sale, as they didn't sell as well in the US as Scarpa/Garmont.
  7. agile trail-rider

    Naw, ya gotta go with C4 dot so you can use it on those approach pitches. Seriously, though, I heard that you have to leave your testicles at home if you ride one or they'll get embarrassed.
  8. what did you do today?

    up at 5 coffee run 1 hour drive to Welches to listen to day five of biochemical talks and hang with eurotrash science people get reminded once again i should work more realize I was near French's Dome and had never seen it drove up Lolo pass road, got pissed it was yet another new "recreataion access tax site" TR'd some route that friends who happened to be there were doing (what was that about work more?) put professional-looking shoes back on drove back to portland picked wife up on her bike ride home from work Laughing Planet Burritos watched some bike races at Alpenrose glass of wine/walk dogs spray on cc.com
  9. Alpiners Anonymous: PDX dry tool night

    Is anyone in need of a partner for some local climbing tomorrow?
  10. Alpiners Anonymous: PDX dry tool night

    I'm trying to escape Pill Hill before 7:00 for a change. So, if the invite's still there: 6:30-ish. I'll go back and review Bill's "don't fall to your death and land on me" instructions for the Butte.
  11. Onion Peak (coast range)

    The Mrs. and I took the walk up Saddle mountain yesterday. I actually didn't notice the slings, but I did think that some of the rock looked more solid than typical coast range. At least the formations I was looking at didn't have much debris at the bases. I'd be interested in some info too, just from a little curiosity/adventure standpoint. With solid rock (and less moss) that slot near the top could have a cool line or two as well.
  12. Non-climbing Injuries are soooo Dumb!

    Is this a climbing or non-climbing injury? A certain person I live with was excited to get a little boulder session in one evening, jumped up to hang and pull up on the 7.5 foot high door trim, started to pull up, peeled, broke three ribs on the hardwood floor.
  13. Alpiners Anonymous: PDX dry tool night

    I'm happy to hear you are healing up Paul. I saw Dave out having a beer shortly after and he told me about your leg. I think I recall some heavy snow that day. It was at the Bowl, so it might count as a gambling debt. Anyway, I was thinking some Saturday morning climbing at Broughton or Beacon was in order. If anyone is up for it, you can save Mrs. Thudman from climbing tomorrow. I guess she's saving her tolerance for rock until a Squamish trip in another week... something about a limited amount of time one can actually enjoy being scared. --Jason
  14. Um, 11worth? Icicle canyon bouldering at Barney's rubble or Forestland (same parking). Tumwater Canyon: swiftwater picnic area. the previous three have almost zero approach, while the family can sit at picnic tables and watch you boulder at swiftwater. If you're up for a fifteen minute walk with the group, the Beach boulders on the far side of the Wenatchee river are a great hangout with a beautiful river beach nearby once the water level drops.
  15. Alpiners Anonymous: PDX dry tool night

    I just might make it out there as well. It looks like one of those rare days when I can escape Pill Hill before 6:30. Rocky somehow sounds more appealing than pulling plastic at the Circuit. To which area should I bring a rope? Jason
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