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AJ

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About AJ

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  • Occupation
    Engineer
  • Location
    West Seattle, WA, USA
  1. Lake Julius

    I was headed up to Scottish Lakes this weekend for some skiing. I read a lot of the posts about Lake Julius last year and figured I'll take my ice gear with me and hope to find decent condtions. I was curious what the masses have to say about the ice there. I thought I heard there were a couple good lines up to 100' (30m) and as steep as WI4. I'm leaving Friday morning. Hope you all enjoy your weekends.
  2. Cinderella Peak

    Has anyone climbed the East Buttress of Cinderella Peak in the Twin Sisters Range? It sounds like a good climb.
  3. Crystal creek?

    A guy I work with went up Crystal Creek about 30 years ago and said he probably wouldn't do it again. Not much to gain via that route unless your objectives include the Nightmare Needles or Pennant and the Flagpole. The route up McClellan from Crystal Creek wouldn't be all that direct anyway.
  4. You will probably get some cold weather and a few storms while you are there. That said, here are some suggestions you and your bride might enjoy. These are definitely at the lower end of the technical and effort scales: - Abbott via Abbott Ridge in Glacier National Park (BC) near Rogers Pass. Abbott Ridge is a fun ridge romp even if Abbott itself is a pile of rocks. Suggest checking out the Elizabeth Parker ACC hut. Nice hike up forest and meadows to start. Easy daytrip. Great views of Mt. Sir Donald (for future trips). Plenty of stuff to do and look into the other hut higher up in the valley for more climbing options. - Mt. Yukness at Lake O'Hara. Mt. Yukness is a scramble. Some good moderate (5.7) multipitch routes on other peaks around the lake. Lake O'Hara is really beautiful. Either camp, stay at the Lake O'Hara Lodge ($$), or stay at the ACC hut. Lots of great high route hiking around the lake and other options for climbs/scrambles. Possible sidetrip up to the Great Cairn ACC hut and other easy alpine trips. I'd plan to spend a few days here. - Mt. Rundle (scramble route) near Banff. You can't help but notice the peak as you drive into Banff from the west. It is a loose pile but a fun day. Have fun.
  5. Enchantments Agenda

    Say you were going into the Enchantments on a Monday and coming out on a Friday with your wife/girlfriend who doesn't lead but follows well to about 5.8. What would your climbing agenda look like?
  6. High Angle Rescue Course????

    I also hear good things about "Ropes that Rescue" in Arizona. They also do a fair amount of industrial type stuff.
  7. Best length for twin ropes?

    I recently posted a similar question about doubles. Initially I got feedback saying 60m was the way to go and then a couple folks (some off-line) recommended 50m. Alpine rock can mean many things but if you plan to climb routes with a lot of rope drag potential then I'd lean toward 50m. If you don't see this as a big problem then stick with the 60m plan. I am still on the fence regarding length for doubles. If I planned to use the ropes for long cragging then I'd probably go with 60m.
  8. Trail Running

    Cougar Mountain Park has some very good trails to run. Also, Weowna Park in Bellevue has some very nice short trails.
  9. I was at Colchuck Lake this past weekend. There is still enough snow above the lake to ski. Some rocks are starting to show but they were obvious. Aasgard Pass seemed to be melting out but you should be able to pick a line for now.
  10. Spine Damage from Chest Harness?

    Fishstick, free hanging in a sit harness for an extended period of time can also kill you. Blood will pool in the legs and within 30 minutes most people will see their upper and lower values for blood pressure equalize. I seem to recall a German study that contrasted full body harnesses to sit harnesses. I thought they found that there was no appreciable safety advantage to one over the other. Basically, it was as much personal preference as anything.
  11. Double Rope Length

    Thanks for all the advice. It sounds like there is general consensus (as much as possible on cc.com) that 2x60m is the better way to go. Time to start shopping.
  12. Double Rope Length

    For those who use double rope systems, what length of rope do you find to work best for you? I'm considering picking up a pair of doubles but I'm having trouble deciding if I really need 60m or if 50m doubles will work. In my situation I will primarily use this setup for alpine rock and ice routes. I'd also like to use a single strand for some typical Cascade volcano/glacier routes. I've rarely ever stretched my 10.5mm x 60m rope. When I've taken my 10.5mm x 50m rope (it doesn't get used a lot now) I don't recall having it come up short much.
  13. Colchuck glacier

    I believe this is correct but you might want to verify with the Leavenworth Ranger District... You need a Wilderness Permit for Colchuck Lake. It is within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness area. Until June 15 there is no limit to the number of overnight users. June 15 and after the Enchantments quota system is in effect.
  14. St. Helens Conditions

    Sunday was nasty. Got to withing 500' of the rim but turned around when we ran out of wands. Visibility was <50', sustained winds over 35 MPH w/ much higher gusts, a little below freezing, some deposits of new snow almost 3' deep. Most of the snow up high was well bonded to the fairly soft crust below. Only saw a couple folks trying as we were coming down. None of them were carrying wands and I kind of wonder if they really were taking compass bearings. It was raining in the parking lot when we got back to the car.
  15. Trail Running Shoes

    You can use your street running shoes for trails most of the time just fine. If you log most of your miles on pavement you might want to stick with your current NB's (replaced about every 300-400 miles). I've got a pair of Montrail Vitesse II and I like them for trails. They have a single density EVA sole so an excessive pronator/supinator might find them a little unstable. The plus side is that they are supposed to land more evenly on uneven surfaces. Goretex for running shoes? Sure, if you don't sweat and can keep water from running down your legs and into your shoes. For some people it makes sense but I get too hot and it would only trap more heat. In the end, whatever fits will probably work for you.
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