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kmehrtens

Mountaineering Boot Fit Question

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I am still shopping for mountaineering boots for my Rainer trip next year. I think I have narrowed my search down to double plastic boots. Living in the flat lands of the midwest there are not a whole lot of shops that carry mountaineering boots so I am forced to buy them on-line.

 

So my "simple" question is, how should a double plastic mountaineering boot fit?

 

Does anyone have a favorite wool/mountaineering sock that they like too?

 

I currently wear a US mens size 8 (Eur 41 1/3) in the two pair or Asolo boots I own now (FSN95GTX & 520GV).

 

Thanks Again.

Edited by kmehrtens

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Single use?

If so rent some. Much better way to go and you can get some that fit better than the hassle of trying on and mailing back a million times.

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will you be going anywhere mountainous before next year?

if so, consider purchasing a pair there so that people can fit you and you can test out a few pairs.

 

when it comes to boots, ditch the attraction of look, go for the feel.

 

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You need to size the shells and the liners separately.

 

To fit the shell: Remove the liners. Insert your foot and slide your toes as far forward as you can. You should have room for 1-2 fingers behind your heel, no more and no less. If you're planning bigger mountains after Rainier, go closer to 2 fingers - your feet swell at altitude.

 

To fit the liners: You want snug, much like normal boots. You do not want your feet to slide around inside. The main difference when fitting mountain boots is that you need to ensure you don't have heel lift when you're frontpointing in your crampons. You'll have no control so you'll climb poorly and you'll get big blisters on your heels.

 

The flip side is that you need to ensure your toes don't rub up against the front of the boot. If they do, you'll bruise your toes on the descent and possibly lose toenails. Oh, and don't forget to leave good wiggle room for your toes. Cut off circulation and you might as well cut off your toes anyway.

Edited by Jon H

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I would rethink the dbl pastic boots. Lots of better more comfortable options. If you are set on plastics by all means rent.

 

Shopping on-line? Three great places to deal with and easy returns with zero hassles are Zappos, Oregon Mtn Community and BackCountry.com

 

The suggestion has been made before with other climbers here starting with the dbl plastic idea and going lighter...and being happy with the decision. Seriously there are any number of boots that would be a better choice that plastic dbls.

 

 

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