Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
jeremyaw

crampons and boots

Recommended Posts

I am planning on climbing mt. hood soon but had a question about crampons. I have a pair of leather waterproof hiking boots, are these suitable for use with rented crampons? Thanks for any info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other question, does anybody recommend a place to rent equipment in the Portland Mt. Hood area. [chubit][big Drink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on how rigid the soles are, and if the crampons are strap-on...

 

Probably a good idea to rent the boots as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can get hinged or rigid strap-on cramps that will work with your boots. On the south-side route, it should be more than enough. The problem with a hiking style boot is that they are not rigid at all so some crampons will flex right off the boot when walking.

 

The person outfitting you wherever you rent should be able to make a solid choice for you...just make sure you have those boots in hand when renting the cramps and try them on to insure fit.

 

South side is a hacked-up ladder in season, you won't be front-pointing up anything, and there's nothing resembling steep on the route...maybe 30 deg 35 tops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that's true, will's right, for southside you probably are fine.

 

though the one time I used strap-ons with standard kinda leather boots I found that for them to stay on very well I had to cinch them down such that the circulation in my feet wasn't so good any more... like will said, tho, if you take the boots in to the rental shop you should be able to try the cramps on with your boots and get some good advice--

 

HAVE FUN!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aside from all the good advice already given, you can rent at REI, Oregon Mountain Community or The Mountain Shop. Be sure and take your boots with you so they can not only make sure your boots are ok with the crampons but also to size them correctly for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last I checked, REI would not rent crampons to those using regular hiking boots. You had to bring them in and prove that they were rigid enough before they would rent to you. Last October a buddy of mine used Stubia Aluminum strap-ons on Mt. Daniel with no problems. I would think they would work fine on Hood. You can pick them up for around $80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

South side is a hacked-up ladder in season, you won't be front-pointing up anything, and there's nothing resembling steep on the route...maybe 30 deg 35 tops.

I dunno...later in the season the upper part (above the schrund) gets icy, or its ice under a thin layer of corn early in the morning. It made me feel better to have mine on. It's certainly not frontpointing, but it made it easier...especially if you're a newbie and your self-arrest ain't the greatest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have witnessed a brutal rag-dolling fall from the pearly gates all the way to hot rocks. I thought the guy was dead. He was tentatively stepping off a ledge at the chute when he slipped, didn't self-arrest, slid a ways, then caught a crampon and flipped a foot or so off the ice. He barely touched the ground the rest of the way down. Good thing the bergschrund was still closed up, he went right over it. So yes, the s. side is pretty innocuous, but you'll want the spikes, you'll want them to fit well, and you'll want to know how to use them correctly. It's only 35 degrees, but you get moving in a hurry when it's icy.

 

I've always found it strange that while REI won't rent harnesses, they will rent crampons. It's not like a crampon failure will always be life-threatening, but it certainly could be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×