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JoshK

Slesse - New Roads? : Logging Tangent

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Now I see what everyone means about Canadian logging. From the Tomyhoi peak area it was pretty evident how...umm...liberal the canadian logging restrictions are.

Edited by fern

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don't give me that BS josh, the clearcuts on the side of Sumas Mountain USA, east of Deming are just as big if not bigger than anything in BC. it just seems like a contrast when you come up thru the park and then look across the border.

 

besides you can drive that road 2wd right to the base of tomyhoi's north face thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

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I know, I'm gonna cash in on that road sometime! wink.gif

 

I guess you are right, it's just the shock of seeing it across from such a rugged and interesting area.

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I really don't think anybody can dispute that logging in the PNW has changed everything.

Think about this... the very nature of the land has completely changed in the last 150 years. The vast lowland stands of alder, maple and cottonwood simply did not exist the way they do today. There was no choking underbrush. These plants existed, but not in any quanity.

 

Imagine this:

A sawmill operated near Kayak point, near what would become Marysville. Even though the mill was a mile from the water

the workers could still see the water, a mile distant thru the massive trees.

Logging has basicly allowed for the amazing quality of life we enjoy. nothing is free, as the costs have been priceless.

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Hmmm, did you know, Lance, that there is often MORE undergrowth under an old growth canopy than under second growth confused.gifconfused.gifconfused.gif

 

Also along major rivers like the Fraser - the flood plain was largely cottonwood and alder not dissimilarly from the way it is today. Its the flat uplands that are farms now that look radically different.

 

But WTF the biggest tree in vegas is in a casino garden isnt it?

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Good call, flood plains allowed for hardwoods to grow. The fact remains that logging practices in the early part of the century completely altered the PNW.

 

What I think about is the giant firs, cedars and hemlock that will someday grow in the streets of Seattle, giant roots splitting the pavement.

 

All is forgiven.

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thumbs_up.gif

 

Nice Lance.

 

You should read "The Island Within" by Richard Nelson.

 

Sorry for the thread drift.

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