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Kerr Adams

Dry-tooling holds

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So i've decided to make a little wall in my backyard to train for climbing. however, i don't want to damage the holds i buy with my tools. Can anyone recommend a solution? I was thinking about using eyebolts. The wall will be at around 40 degrees so tools skating off could be an issue.

 

Cheers!

 

Kerr

 

 

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you could do what I have done in the past and collect various real rocks, use a roto hammer and drill two holes in them and attach to your wall using coarse thread lag bolts.

On small jibs etc I have used drywall screws.

On the holds using lag bolts I used a larger diameter drill bit to make a countersink hole.

this will make for durable holds that are textured and not just like real rock they are real rock. :)

Maybe a little labor intesive but not so much as the Burdick method.

They are pretty as well.

 

 

 

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Stone Gardens makes a bunch of the holds out of simple squares of plywood, works great.

 

x2. I got the most used out of pieces of 4x4s that I drilled in with a 3/8 bit to make hooks into. You can easily drill hooks on every side of a piece of 4x4 to tackle different movements. I drilled some inverted (to make stein-pulls) and put a piece of carpet down against the base of the hold to protect the wall.

 

I hear door hinges work very well too. Cheap, durable, and they train accuracy in placement.

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+1 for door hinges! Great for precision placements and foot work..

 

I built an "ice wall" on the side of my garage.....looks more like a yard sale gone bad, but is a great trainer. I took a 1x3x10 piece of AZEK and cut as many odd shaped pieces out of it as I could and screwed them all over the garage. The AZEK hold up really well to axes and crampons.....much better than wood.

 

The wood however gives you the added reality of chunks breaking off tho :)

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I never had any wood break on my wall. I did however break a lot of purchased "drytooling" holds.

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