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Runner Question

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I'm going to replace some of my Mammut 8mm runners this year but a bit confused by the different material types and the benefits/shortcomings of each. Any reliable web resources that explain the differences - something like "Dynex and Dyneema. Everything you want to know...then some!" that you know of? I Googled but all I can find are sellers.

 

Like everyone, I'm looking for the best mix of durability, strength and weight. I've been happy enough with the Mammuts but I wanna do a bit more research this time rather than just go for the lightest thing out there. Thanks - Tim.

 

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This is the sort of question best asked on RC.com. Chemically, the material is the same but if I remember correctly, the yarns are spun differently, one being finer than the other. It is said that the finer yarn version gets fuzzy faster, but I doubt it makes a difference. You can't really go wrong with the Mammut.

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If got 24 mammut slings, and 10 wild county. Its my observation that the mammuts hold up much better. Not sure why, but they definately fussed less. I know this doesnt address your question very well!

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Anyone have any advice on when to replace the super skinny slings?

---

After about 5 years of using the super skinny ones,

I'm going back to using slightly thicker sewn slings.

 

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they thing about dynemma is that when mixed with nylon they abraid, so that maybe why the WC didnt last longer, not a good ratio.

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What do you mean "mixed with nylon"? Are you saying that there were slings that combined two different fiber types?

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I've had mine 3 years and ready to replace just a few of them that look a little worse for wear. I haven't heard anything definitive on the whole material breakdown thing and I'm sure they're still within that "usable" range somewhere but it's a comfort thing for me...that plus I'm a natural gear whore anyway.

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yeah mammut slings are made up of mainly spectra(dynemma)and a little nylon. when they looks ratty then its time to think about replacement.

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I can't remember if Dynex is chemically the same as Dyneema/Spectra or not, but it's probably similar. Dyneema and Spectra are chemically exactly the same (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene/UHMWPE) the only difference is in the production process for creating the actual yarn. Dyneema was pioneered and patented by DSM in the Netherlands and Spectra was pioneered and patented by Allied Signal in the good ol' US of A. This is why you typically find Dyneema in Mammut slings (European company) and Spectra in Yates slings (American company). However last summer/fall there was talk of DSM licensing or buying a facility in the US to make Dyneema in order to keep up with the increased worldwide demand (primarily military).

 

Like I said I can't remember if Dynex is just another new production process or not, but I think it's actually chemically a bit different although still a high molecular weight yarn. These types of high molecular weight yarns they are very impermeable to pretty much anything, including dyes. So any colored yarns in a Dyneema/Spectra sling are actually dyed nylon fibers woven in. This is also why the Wild Things Spectra Icesac is white and on Dyneema gridstop nylon the grids are always white.

 

I might not have explained this super clearly as it's late but if they're any questions I'll try my best to answer. If it's slow at work tomorrow I might take a look through all the files from the research I did for my internship last summer and see what other technical info I have.

 

 

As for durability/when to replace slings - I find the construction method of my Mammut slings with one end sewn inside of the other to be much better than my Wild Country slings which are just one end bar-tacked on top of the other in the standard fashion. I haven't heard any numbers in terms of years on when to retire them but I treat them just like my rope - examine periodically for obvious signs of wear and if I don't like what I see I replace them - $15 for a couple slings is a hell of a lot cheaper than a trip to the ER.

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