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salbrecher

equalizing with daisy chain

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Anyone have any answers to why daisies are more advantageous, please share?

 

Think single pitch climbin' Ken. When you get to the top of a pitch and need to thread the rope through the chains to get down, you can't be tied in with the rope.

 

Actually you can use the rope. Here is how, clip in with the rope, ask for slack, make a bite in the rope that is going down to your belayer, pass the bite through the chains or anchor, tie an 8 in the bite, clip it to your harness with a locker, pull up on the anchor and have your partner take, sit back and untie the end of the rope that is through your harness and the anchor, pull the tail through the chains or anchor, then lower. At this point you are on the rope with a 8 on a bite clipped with a locker with the rope passed through the anchor. Most of the the time though on single pitch stuff there is no shortage of draws and slings to use.

 

Attaching with daisy or sling to the anchor rather than rope also helps reduce clusterfuck potential on multipitch routes. Not a big deal for folks that are experienced at stacking the rope and swapping leads etc.

 

Actually I think using daisies or slings for that matter add to the clusterfuck at belays. By using the rope you only have the rope coming from peoples harness the anchor, where as with a daisy you have that going to the anchor and rope also coming from the harness, not a big deal though. Yeah Chuck swapping over ropes with more than two people is facilitated by a daisy, but there is an abundance of slings at the point when everybody is there to do the swap and it is way way more efficient to not swap ropes often and lead in block with three or more people. To each their own though. Got system? I got one.

 

Edited by ken4ord

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Yeah I know that trick, and it's a good one to know, but it's kinda a pain in the ass to get the doubled rope through the chains and pull it through. Especially with fat ropes and skinny chains. I've only done it a few times.

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A couple people asked why you would only be disconnected from a daisy 50% of the time in stead of 100% if the pockets blow. Depending on how you clip you either clip just stitiching which can blow out, or if your lucky you get a twist in the sling, and it ends up with an extra rap around the carabiner. makes more sense if you try it yourself though.

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I girth hitch a dasiy to my harness and then girth hitch the other and around a locker. This seems to avoid the 50% detachment problem.

 

That said, on anything more than 1 pitch I tend to anchor in with the rope anyway. But the Daisy is still useful for many things and doesn't seem to get in the way for me so Ill probably keep on using one.

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