Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Alex_Mineev

newbe needs advice

Recommended Posts

Hi, I just assembled my first AT setup and am burning :blush: with desire to try it out.

 

I am blue-black downhill skier and assume this qualifies as a beginner level on non-groomed terrain.

I am thinking going up Muir. I've been on the snowfield at least 20 times but hardly ever looked at it from skiers perspective.

Hence the question - will a beginner be able to ski down the snowfield at least 80% of the way? :crosseye:

There is one caveat - I will be skiing in my plastic climbing boots which I assume will make things quite challenging.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm guessing you will also have a pack on? Even without a pack on, skiing in mountaineering boots is waaaayyy harder than with downhill ski boots as plastic climbing boots just don't offer the support to power the ski's. You might try a few practice runs before you get up on the Muir. If you can't afford AT boots you can rent them. I consider myself and expert downhill skier with no hesitation on double blacks but I will never try skiing in my plastic mountaineering boots again. I did it once, and it really sucked!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Day pack, should be way less than 15 pounds.

Yeah, I've heard climbing boots make it gnarly...

My biggest reason for getting into skiing is to speed up approaches, so I am willing to tolerate the inconviniences unless they grow into bone-breaking.

 

Yes, I will play a bit downhill before getting above the steep hill at 7k. I have vague memories there is a way on climbers left of the panorama point that looks like a not-so-steep ascending traverse. I wonder if this could be the easiest ski route in both directions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're comfortable walking down the snowfield, what have you got to lose by bringing your skis?

 

If you're not used to looking at things from a skier's perspective, it might help to reinforce that the snow conditions will have a huge influence on your experience. Make sure to think about what the skiing/snow conditions will be like at different elevations, aspects, and time of day, on the day you go. Make an effort to time things to your advantage, especially considering your boots.

 

The climbers left route up pan pt is slightly less steep I think, I've gone that way but it required some careful skinning through some rock bands. might be an option if the rocks are covered up. The cow path isn't that much steeper and has a good runout, just don't take anyone out if you yardsale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your skis are pretty stubby I bet the boots won't be that much of an issue. It will add spice compared to your downhill stuff........

 

If you can ski from the base of Panorama to the parking lot you can ski from Muir to the top of Pan. I doubt the issue will be the steepness but rather the snow conditions. Sorry, but from a skiing perspective the Muir snowfield is all too often the most godforsaken sidehilly wind-rippped satruginous shithole on earth. There are alternatives: across the way in the N facing bowls of the Tatoosh it's usually a nice day for something although you have to do laps to get the same vertical.

 

As far as skiing in your climbing boots, learn the survival stuff soon if you haven't already. I mean kick turns and stem turns. If you can confidently do those you can ski most snow conditions and slopes except maybe narrow slots wearing Converse all-stars if you have to. There's plenty of time for the fancy stuff to come later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got 170 Atomic Chugach which might be 5cm longer than I initually planned for backcountry but hope it works :)

Going up there tomorrow albeit weather is gonna suck.

 

On the other hand I skied Tahoma creek up to the wonderland trail bridge three weeks ago in 185 xcountry skis and it did not feel so bad except some clumsy fight on icy crust spots on the way down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the other hand I skied Tahoma creek up to the wonderland trail bridge three weeks ago in 185 xcountry skis and it did not feel so bad except some clumsy fight on icy crust spots on the way down.

 

That's the spirit. It doesn't get much worse than skinny skis on junk snow in the woods. The sastrugi will seem like butter.....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×