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Mendizale

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About Mendizale

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    stranger
  • Birthday 11/26/2017

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  • Location
    Seattle, WA
  1. Hey all, I'm looking to sell my Freney GTX boots, so I can get something that suits my low-volume foot more snuggly (though these are not high-volume shoes). Go to http://www.scarpa.com/scarpa.php and look under the Mountain/Backpack section. Freneys are mixed ice/vertical ice boots, and are about as light as technical boots get. They're perfect for many Cascade winter ascents or more technical summer ones. Specifics: Freney GTX XT Size 44.5 (between 10.5 and 11 US) Practically brand new--about 15 miles of snow approach and moderate crampon use. New as in you can still see the size markings on the inside ankle tag, and the lugs are just barely abraded. Retail is $399, I'm asking for $300 $285. Thanks for looking, Mendizale PS I'd be happy to take pictures for interested parties, and I live in Ballard/Phinney Ridge in Seattle.
  2. Hi Nicole, Gregory packs are made well and are known for more lumbar support. While it's hard to find a really supportive 30-35 litre pack, the Jade 35 is pretty solid, and is sold in many stores around the NW. Go to the Gregory website to check it out (http://www.gregorypacks.com/products/womens/technical/36/jade-35). Except for the comment about the water bottles, ignore the first user review at the REI site (http://www.rei.com/product/773933). Pack retails for $140. Best, Mendizale
  3. Hey all, I'm looking to sell my Freney GTX boots, so I can get something that suits my low-volume foot more snuggly (though these are not high-volume shoes). Go to http://www.scarpa.com/scarpa.php and look under the Mountain/Backpack section. Freneys are about as light as stiff, technical boots get. They're perfect for many Cascade winter ascents or more technical summer ones. Specifics: Freney GTX XT Size 44.5 (between 10.5 and 11 US) Practically brand new--about 15 miles of snow approach and moderate crampon use. New as in you can still see the size markings on the inside ankle tag, and the lugs are just barely abraded. Retail is $399, I'm asking for $300 $285. Thanks for looking, Mendizale PS I'd be happy to take pictures for interested parties, and I live in Ballard/Phinney Ridge in Seattle.
  4. [TR] The Tooth - 5-10-2009 5/10/2009

    May I ask which way you approached? Thanks...
  5. The Tooth

    Hey Folks, The most recent TR on the Tooth is from January. Has anybody been there more recently, who can speak to the snow and route conditions? Many thanks in advance, Mendizale
  6. Found: MSR Reactor Stove

    Hey folks, I found a stove near Exit 38 while walking around with my pooch. Any ideas? It has a few distinguishing characteristics, so the first person to identify takes the prize. Otherwise, I keep eet... Happy claiming, Mendizale
  7. MH Direttissima versus Gregory Alpinisto

    Thanks for your time and thoughtful response, Dane. So, do you find it big enough for your average 2-4 day, Spring-Fall trips? Have you found the triple haul point system to be a boon, or kind of superfluous? Any other thoughts, anyone?
  8. I've been wanting a sweet, burly, versatile alpine pack for years now, and I've been offered a screaming deal on these two packs. They're both about 50 liters, and I'm sure they're made well. I've tried on the MH Dihedral, which is just a slightly lower volume version of the Direttissima, and I liked it's features well enough. It's fit, however, was blah: not bad, no weird spots, just didn't fit amazingly well, the way I want my only alpine pack to feel. I have a Gregory Triconi, and I like it a lot. I also love my Gregory Advent Pro, which has a similar Wrapter feature to the Alpinisto. But I won't get the opportunity to try the Alpinisto itself, and I've heard it's heavier than average (not a deal-breaker if it carries weight well), smallish feeling on the interior, and has a fairly inconsequential extension tube at the top, a fairly useful bivy pad, and a non-traditional daisy chain equivalent. Both packs have removable bonnets, hip belts, and frame sheets/stays. Does anybody who owns, has used, or has other experiences with the ins and outs of either of these packs have any advice or comments? I'd be very thankful for any prompt help! Thanks in advance...
  9. Hi minx. I'm also looking for something of a climbing partner, as I'm new to the area and haven't met many people yet. As it is I climb at Stone Gardens in Ballard, for fun and to winter train for for the sport and trad climbs I love so much in fairer weather. I'm currently working in retail, so my schedule is in constant flux, but I still get to the gym 2-4 times a week, often late morning or early afternoon. Let me know how to proceed, if you're game to meet up once in a while.
  10. Climbing/Training partner for Sport, Trad, Alpine

    Thank you gents, I appreciate your feedback. I didn't even know there was a "Partner's Forum", or I wouldn't have wasted all your time.
  11. So I'm new to the forum and new to Washington State. I'm currently climbing at Stone Gardens here in Ballard. I enjoy wallratting some times, and love outdoor routes at all times. Enthused about sport, trad, and alpine climbing, but I need a solid partner to train with or, at the very least, go adventuring with. This is taking on all the squeezy allure of a craigslist personal ad, but does anybody have some advice on how to go about procuring a climbing partner? I normally find them through friends or at a gym, but I've yet to make many of the former, and Stone Gardens seems rich with the (admirable) bouldering type, and a bit low on the types of climbing I'm most interested in. Apologies for my English, and thanks in advance!
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