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LUCKY

Out of control dogs at the Coulee

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When someone ask nicely for you to control your dog(s) that means leash them, not let then loose and show there canines at climbers passing by :anger:

Next time I will ask to LEASH your FRIKING DOG(S) after that it could get ugly, there was some aggressive talk around the campfire :mistat:

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I'm climbing a route at sunshine and when I get back to the ground I discover someones dogs ate my lunch. I get a "sorry'bout that". awesome. Not to mention dogs could easily knock rocks on to lower tiers where people could be climbing. We need to make this a mandatory leash area.

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No we just need some mandatory personal responsibility. Not every climber has a dog that needs to be leashed.

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I'm with Lucky on this one. Unleashed dogs don't belong at crags or campgrounds. And places like Sunshine Wall, etc., with single file trails and climbers often on routes below, make a wandering dog a threat, not a mere inconvenience. I know, I know. Your dog is awesome. And you (dog owner) probably are, too. But after stepping in a couple of huge piles of dog crap this weekend--and having had plenty of my food stolen out of my hand/pack by crag dogs in the past, always responded to by an owner's smiling apology (but never my sandwich back, interestingly)--we need to ask dog owners to remember that campgrounds and crags are not off-leash areas.

Edited by Erik Gearhart

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I don't even want to think about the possibility that these unleashed dogs might also be stoned.

 

That would explain the missing sandwiches, though.

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My dogs name is Sharma...surely he be off leash right?? It is funny though when we call his name around the crag and talk about Sharma being back at camp, the chatter around the crag about Sharma possibly being in the area is hilarious. Maybe I should change the dogs name to Honnold...

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Love Dogs, out of control DOG OWNERS not so much, I don't care if you leash your dog, it's weather you have control of your dog, this weekend children were at risk by BAD DOG OWNERS and when ask to keep control of their DOGS still other climbers, the crews leashed dog in camp, and kids were at risk, this is unacceptable, and after you have been ask to take control of your dog and he bites someone let me know how that works out for you in court.

Oh yeah for those BAD DOG OWNERS that statement he has never bit anyone :fahq: ...hey I have had dogs from forever...you cannot totally trust a dog ever...2 years ago...BAD DOG OWNER... my dog doesn't bite...flip'n drew blood :anger:

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No we just need some mandatory personal responsibility. Not every climber has a dog that needs to be leashed.

actually they do need to be leashed.

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Leash em! It's not everyone else's job to deal with your dog's behavior. A couple of years ago at Nevermind Wall, I had a guy's dog piss all over and into my pack. The owner turned out to be a very nice guy who was oh so sorry as he tried to rinse off my pack with his canteen water. Jeez..what makes some people so self-centered, narcissistic, etc, to be unable to see the effects their action (or their dog's) may have on others?

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GOOD :fahq::lmao: AND it's BAD DOG OWNERS :lmao:

at least bad dogs don't use ALL CAPS. I find that annoying.

CLIMBING ACCESS ADVOCATE :lmao:

Edited by LUCKY

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No we just need some mandatory personal responsibility. Not every climber has a dog that needs to be leashed.

actually they do need to be leashed.

 

Neat. If you get a dog you can leash it. Your opinion is really great but there are no leash laws at any crag I've been to nearby except for Smith.

 

I totally agree that aggressive dogs should be leashed. As should food-marauding dogs. Though, you have to admit the "victim" bears some co-responsibility by leaving food out in the open, and at least the dog didn't drink your beer.

 

 

 

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When someone ask nicely for you to control your dog(s) that means leash them, not let then loose and show there canines at climbers passing by :anger:

Next time I will ask to LEASH your FRIKING DOG(S) after that it could get ugly, there was some aggressive talk around the campfire :mistat:

Them doggies might have smelled a love of overcrowded, over-bolted convenience crags? :rawk: I've experienced the canine beasts myself (most notably in Icicle Canyon near Leavenworth) and can't stand them either, but the indoor-gym-edumacated masses will arrive in droves with their pooches (typically named "Denali", "Tahoma" or "Tatoosh") and they WILL snap at you and eat your sammiches.

Apparently some are even trainin' them to Clip 'n Go!! Yee-haW!:

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wall_climbing4_by_filarska-d3kj1wo.jpg

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No we just need some mandatory personal responsibility. Not every climber has a dog that needs to be leashed.

actually they do need to be leashed.

 

Totally agree! they do need to be leashed. Did you all know that a couple of weeks ago, a dog went over one of the cliffs and, as of last info, was on the way to the vet to be put down?

 

Also, the dog could have knocked rocks down on climbers below. And there are other safety issues. What if your "friendly" ( they are always friendly) attacks a belayer or destracts one by going for a free lunch or a pee on the rope/gear/pack. The possibilities for bad outcomes are numerous, and with the crowds there, the number of permutations of conflict interactions starts to go exponential. Get a clue--we don't all want to deal with your dog, who prob is a really good guy/gal.

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No we just need some mandatory personal responsibility. Not every climber has a dog that needs to be leashed.

actually they do need to be leashed.

 

 

Also, the dog could have knocked rocks down on climbers below. And there are other safety issues. What if your "friendly" ( they are always friendly) attacks a belayer or destracts one by going for a free lunch or a pee on the rope/gear/pack. The possibilities for bad outcomes are numerous, and with the crowds there, the number of permutations of conflict interactions

 

Yes the AAC's Accidents in North American Mountaineering is rife with accounts of fatalities caused by dogs at the crag.

 

The real danger lies in having your dog belay you though. They are very easily distracted.

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No we just need some mandatory personal responsibility. Not every climber has a dog that needs to be leashed.

actually they do need to be leashed.

 

 

Also, the dog could have knocked rocks down on climbers below. And there are other safety issues. What if your "friendly" ( they are always friendly) attacks a belayer or destracts one by going for a free lunch or a pee on the rope/gear/pack. The possibilities for bad outcomes are numerous, and with the crowds there, the number of permutations of conflict interactions

 

Yes the AAC's Accidents in North American Mountaineering is rife with accounts of fatalities caused by dogs at the crag.

 

The real danger lies in having your dog belay you though. They are very easily distracted.

 

And the not having opposable thumbs as well. That could be an issue while belaying.

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Some dogs need to be leashed, some don't. The problem is that dog owners are often a pretty poor judge of whether their dog is "out of control." This is why crags like smith, that are heavily managed, have leash laws. While these laws do not exist in climbing areas like Leavenworth and Vantage, I think the majority of us are in agreement that out of common courtesy dog owners should voluntarily keep their dogs leashed.

 

Personally, I think the whole crag dog thing is getting out of control and in my experience very few dogs are mellow enough to hang out at the base of a climbing area without bothering people. Dog owners, you need to understand that some people don't want to interact with your dog, period. What you think is your dog "being friendly" is what some people find really annoying and/or frightening. You have the right to have a dog, you have a right to bring it places, but your dog does not have a right to be in my face. The unambiguous answer to this dilemma is leashes.

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I brought a buddies dog to the crag with me once and leashed him to a tree. Being the destructive little demon that he is with massive chompers he proceeded to chew through and fell the poor tree that I had tied him to. (Badger, NO!). I no longer bring dogs climbing with me.

 

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Imagine someone brought their toddler to the crag and the child ate your sandwich, stepped on your rope and gear, licked your hand when you weren't looking, knocked rocks on people below, dug up a bunch of native plants, shit on the ground close to the crag (and left it), chased squirrels and birds, bawled inconsolably while the parent was up climbing, and slept on your gear or in the middle of the trail.

 

Then imagine the parent ignored most of these behaviors and said, "Don't worry, he's friendly" when asked to control the child.

 

You'd think the parent was a selfish, inconsiderate @%#$, and you'd be right.

 

Why should dog owners get a free pass?

 

Even on leashes, dogs detract from the experience of other climbers/hikers/users in many ways.

 

Solution: Non-service dogs should be left at home. Just like National Parks.

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