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YakCLimber78

Hip Surgery

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I was recently told by my Dr that I will be in need of having a bit of "work" don't to my left hip. He is going to performa laproscopic re-shaping of my femur and pelvis and repair my labrum. Has anybody had this type of surgery or anything close? I understand that it has a bit of a recovery time (I already realize that my skiing next year is gone), but I want to know how you feel in year 2,3,5, etc. Any insight would be great.

 

Paul

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I believe that Pat, a guide with Alpine Ascents, had a femur resurfacing a few years back and that guy still guides and climbs like one strong dude. And he's mid to late-50ish

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using Pat Timson as a example for the average joe is a horrible idea. Pat is an animal and would still climb if both his legs fell off. Prolly just hand over hand everything.

 

I remember him before the surgery and he was always out and smiling even though it was painful. Nothing stops him.

 

Good luck with that YC. Must really be painful to be considering something like that.

Edited by genepires

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My dad had a hip resurfacing when he was in his early 50's. Climbed Rainier a little over a year after that. Coming down was rougher on it than going up. He lost some hip mobility, which is challenging with rock climbing sometimes. But overall he's much more mobile and happier than before he had it done.

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using Pat Timson as a example for the average joe is a horrible idea.

Using Pat, and people like him is a great idea. His psyche and his positive attitude is a key to any recovery. I am sick and tired of fat fucktards making these procedures into more, then they really are.

For one, I would as a question: have you done everything as far as rehab related, before considering a surgery. Surgery should be your last option, when all other avenues are exhausted.

I would also say, having a second and independent opinion would be a good idea.

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I just had my knee done in the middle of Dec. The recovery is on you. Doctors and physical therapy can only guide you, you have to take the initiative of following through with the recommended program and it's not that easy. You have to apply yourself.

 

I took 9 weeks off from work and it's a near full time job if you are serious about recovery. Also don't expect 100 percent pain free. My knee still hurts some times, although not near as bad as before surgery. A friend of mine had his hip resurfaced over 3 years ago and he says there's some soreness after a day of climbing/hiking.

 

I'm just glad to be climbing again. The knee got so bad I didn't climb for the last year before the operation. If I had to do it again I would go for it sooner. That year of inactivity meant the muscles got weaker and that's not good for knee stability. Also I would have it done in spring or summer. The cold of winter sort of hinders recovery.

 

Surgery is the last option but when the cartilage is gone and it's bone on bone it's only going to get worse. At that point surgery is the only option.

 

One other thing, when you have a compromised joint and it starts hurting you will favor it and start limping. That leg will get smaller and atrophied. Plus you become conditioned to favor it so when it's repaired you have to undo that conditioning or it won't get back to full strength.

 

Here's some of my recovery itinerary.

 

Physical Therapy (50 min sessions) twice a week for 9 weeks, after that once a week for another 3 weeks. Three times a week would have been better but this was the max allowed by insurance.

 

3 weeks, hike Rattlesnake Ledge with crutches 4 mi, 1200' gain (this was too far, should have gone shorter)

 

4 weeks, exercise at home, walks in neighborhood

 

5 weeks, Barclay lake, 4 mi, minimum gain, with ski poles. This was too far also.

 

6 weeks, Heybrook Lookout 2.5 mi, 800'. This was perfect distance. Princely and GNS at Index, about 4 pitches

 

7 weeks, 5 pitches at Index, Heybrook Lookout, Climbing Gym,

 

8 weeks, Recon Baring, 2000' gain, Climbing Gym

 

9 weeks, Smith 8 pitches in 2 days to 5.10, Heybrook Lookout, Climbing Gym

 

10 weeks, Baring summit (normal), 3800' gain. Normally done in 1 day. Climbed to summit on 1st day and bivied below summit. Back to car on 2nd day by noon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Very good example of just keep plugging along. And yes, better, but not perfect is good advice. I have a lot of respect for folks who know they want to get back at it and then put in the foundation to do so. Cheers and good job :brew:

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Unfortunately, I have had 4 opinions and they all lead to the same conclusions. Thanks again all for the insight and the positivity....... :)

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just curious, what are the 4 options?

 

BTW, I was just kidding about using Pat as a bad example. Just noting that Pat is far above the norm and his example is not typical. But his positive attitude and dedication to rehab and to getting out, whatever the reason or activity, is a great example for anyone after such a drastic surgery.

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IMO for a healthy person 50% of recovery depends on attitude and effort. Pat is a prime example, that hard work and positive attitude can accomplish a lot. I think people like Pat absolutely should be used as role model. And by no means I was trying to be dismissive towards Gene, who is a stand up guy.

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So....

I am T-Minus 48hrs from the day of days. I have done all the research, had a cortisone injection to get me thru the spring and early summer, got my last weekend of climbing in at Leavenworth/Peshastin..... Now it's time to go under the knife. Talk at y'all in August.

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I've been on crutches now since the morning of the 31st of July. At this point, I feel like that annoying old man down the street that shakes his cane at the kids riding their bikes in the street. Twice-daily PT is starting to show the progress I've been waiting for; and surprisingly, I actually hurt less now than I did the day before my surgery....... God bless Percocet!! :crazy:

I'll keep y'all posted, can't wait to get back out!

 

Yak

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wish I'd found this thread earlier -- don't know about hips specifically, but I can offer some general perspective:

 

took a ride in a lightning-triggered avalanche five years ago - broke "pretty much everything" - received last rites from the family priest - was supposed to have lost my right foot (ankle was fractured, and remained dislocated for over twelve hours) - when folks ask what I learned from the experience, I tell them I learned I'll be able to climb long after I've lost the ability to walk -- I was rock climbing before I could walk without canes, because for climbing I could use my hands to help with balance. My rebuilt ankles (the left was not as severely damaged as the right) were not strong enough to balance me for walking unassisted, but were fine for moderate rock climbing. I'm in the Tetons this weekend, to help coach a group of wounded veterans to the top of the Grand.

My take on recovery? - physical therapy is just another word for workout, and PT stands as easily for Personal Trainer as for Physical Therapist. At five years along, I'm still relearning to run. As of last season (2014) I can hike off-trail sans trekking poles without a pack. With any load, I still need poles for anything more challenging than a sidewalk.

 

I don't know Pat Timson well, but a list of equally inspirational figures in the Wenatchee area would include

 

Dr Mark Shipman - has TWICE fully recovered from breaking his neck,(he still refuses to give up paragliding!?!) and at age 67 still pulls the occasional WI5.

 

Dr Glen Fries - paralyzed below the sternum since a bicycle accident mid-nineties, has trained himself to WALK with canes. the joke goes "wrecked his bike, been walkin' around paralyzed ever since" Glen no longer climbs, but kayaks several days per week.

 

Charlie Hickenbotham - retired schoolteacher climbing again after hip replacement last spring

 

and my all-time favorite would be New Englander Hugh Herr - winning climbing competitions on prosthetic feet which he designs himself.

 

For me, recovery felt like being a little kid again -- every day I could do something I couldn't do the day before. That was exciting! Folks don't get it when I tell them those were some of the most exciting, fun weeks of my life. Yeah, I was flat on my back for a couple of months, but every day I could do something I couldn't do the day before. Nowadays I have to wait longer between measurable gains, and it's nowhere near as exciting. But five years along, at age 62, I'm getting stronger every day. Other guys my age are fading slowly, but I have the privilege of getting BETTER, STRONGER each day, each year - so I feel compelled to view my injury as a gift. Continually improving function - it's like getting physically younger, each year, instead of older...!?!

 

please keep us apprised of how your recovery progresses, and let us know when you're ready to hop back into the harness...

 

-Haireball

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monty....

Your story reminds me of myself over the past 10 years. I was in a nasty accident (tried to wrestle with a tree while snowboarding) about 10 years ago and that landed me in the ICU for 5 days. A year later, I ran my first marathon, did a trip to Denali, and in 2009 I saw my son's birth.

Over the following years, my left side began to break-down, my knee started to hurt more and more, and I eventually ended up not being able to run more than about 25 feet.

I had a nice little visit with my ortho doc and his PA (I ski with both of them) and they concluded that my hip was the issue....... Fast forward to today.

I am 3 weeks out from surgery, my hip hurts less than the day I went in, my range of motion is improving, and I can actually see a light at the end of the tunnel.......... I just have to keep reminding myself not to over do it. I agree fully that PT = Personal Training (or more-closely Physical Terrorism), but it is worth it in the long run.

We all need to keep our heads up when injuries happen and put in just as much time recovering as we do to our training and prep for our adventures.

Keep on keepin' on.

 

Yak

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Well, here's an update for anyone that's been reading this. Today I am one month, eleven days post-op. As per my PT, my range of motion is 100%, I've been off crutches for just over a week, and I only need my cane (Big Pimp'in) when I go for longer distances. I feel great!

My wife and I went to the Wallowas this past weekend to get out of town. We did a TON of walking, took the tram to the top of Mt. Howard and did a bit of "hiking", and walked around the campground with the dogs. While I was sore, after a night's rest, pain was no-more.

I can't wait to get out and play again!!

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So, It's been 3 months since surgery and I honestly feel great! I started dynamic movements in PT, am cleared to bike, walk, use most of the cardio machines at the gym, and do many other things to help get stronger.

This has been a tough month for me on many fronts, so my wife and I decided to do a "hike" while we were in Central Oregon over the Halloween weekend. While I know that a hike like what we did is not that impressive, I was able to do it at a 2.5 mile pace, have almost no discomfort, and was WIRED afterwards....... ready for more!!

I can't wait for my next major goal: tieing in and climbing something easy.

 

Here's a link to my track:

http://www.movescount.com/moves/move81984500

 

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sounds like a great recovery. just fyi, I find it usually takes about 12-18 months for the bones and tissues attaching to them to recover completely. In all honesty it took me something like 12 months to recover from my appendectomy and about 6 months to recover from shoulder dislocation. I regained a full function very quickly, but these are the times it took me to get back to 100% fitness levels prior to these events. So don't get frustrated, if you feel like your body fitness is not as it was for about a year. Now also don't forget to work your upper body for climbing. Even though you still can't climb, you can use finger board for finger strength, you can do lat machine, rowing machines, bendover rows, barbell rows, to keep you upper body muscles strong. In the early 90's I had some big toe issues, which sidelined me for a few weeks at the time, and every time I returned to climbing, I was actually stronger, because I trained my upper body like a fiend.

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I find actual weight training, plus a finger board much better for staying in shape for climbing. Pull-ups also can cause elbow and shoulder repetitive strain injuries if you are not careful.

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So it's Update TIME!

I've begun to increase both my weight-training program and the lengths of my walks and hikes (not on the same days). I have noticed that my hip is starting to ache less and less after longer or more intense activity and that my strength is increasing as well.

Keeping a positive outlook has been the most difficult part.... I have lost two very close family members in the past 6-weeks and that has weighed on my psyche. With that being said, I am now at the point where I can use exercise to help with destracting me..... which is always good.

 

Hope y'all have a great week!

Yak

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