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Snowshoe routes on CC.com?

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Hey y'all.....

I know cc.com is alpinism focused, but I'm putting this out there. I'm researching long snowshoe routes in the PNW (5-6 days) to be done in Mid-April. Snow conditions then will determine the final location, but if you have any TRs to link to or solid suggestions on specific ridges/ranges/regions to explore at length, I would love to discuss.

 

Thinking of circumnavigation of Three Sisters with a summit thrown in, alpine lakes wilderness area? But I like the North Cascades better. Too many options there! Help narrow it down?

 

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Your best bet would be to get a copy of Dan A. Nelson's book 2nd edition on "Snowshoe Routes in Washington" at Amazon or REI, (for a nominal cash outlay), the information that he provides is invaluable. He's done a major amount of research, and covers the best areas - including North Cascades and Alpine Lakes. His longest routes are maybe 2-3 days - the highest elevations may last until April, he calls them best with some fresh snow Dec - March.

Which brings up the backcountry issues of avalanche, navigation and able to haul in enough gear, food and dry clothes - a sled helps in the longer treks. I'm not sure what your level of experience is in these issues - but generally speaking, I've encountered severe temps in the 0-10 degree range and the fun trip becomes an epic survival adventure, as these areas are the most rugged in the Northwest - but also the most beautiful. Have fun, be safe and good luck.

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Small edit- think you meant Dan Nelson as author of that book. Jim is a skier more than a snowshoer.

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could use any ski tour guide and just do those. a 2 day ski tour will take you 4 days, at least.

 

also could use a regular hiking guide for a resource.

 

get a list of the open fire lookouts and head up that via their hiking routes. Only did two but they were real nice.

 

usual disclaimer: be very avi wary. on a long trip, you WILL be setting foot on a slope that is at that perfect angle for avalanche. learn about avi awareness.

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bobinc - Oops! My error, all credits to Dan.

genespires - you are correct on all counts - Snowshoeing is just winter hiking, but with the need for good nav skills and the added danger of avalanche.

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Good info y'all....

 

I'm a seasoned hiker and navigator, intermediate snowshoer (100 miles), beginner mountaineer (3 summits, 20 days steep snow solo) . I have read/studied avalanche awareness but have not taken an Avy 1 course. I plan on hiking solo unless I round someone up here. I would be limited to researching snowpack conditions, avalanche forecasts and avoiding obvious danger zones. How crazy would I be to go?

 

So, exploring the ski-touring routes seems logical. I'm guessing a guidebook would indicate ski-descents that are too steep for snowshoes? Is something like the Heather Ridge-Skyline Ridge at Stevens Pass something to consider. Thanks in advance for your time on this....

 

 

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Good info y'all....

 

I'm a seasoned hiker and navigator, intermediate snowshoer (100 miles), beginner mountaineer (3 summits, 20 days steep snow solo) . I have read/studied avalanche awareness but have not taken an Avy 1 course. I plan on hiking solo unless I round someone up here. I would be limited to researching snowpack conditions, avalanche forecasts and avoiding obvious danger zones. How crazy would I be to go?

 

So, exploring the ski-touring routes seems logical. I'm guessing a guidebook would indicate ski-descents that are too steep for snowshoes? Is something like the Heather Ridge-Skyline Ridge at Stevens Pass something to consider. Thanks in advance for your time on this....

 

1. Take a Level One Avalanche course, get a transceiver if you don't already have one;

2. Please avoid snowshoeing in the skin track if you go to BC Ski destinations like Heather/Skyline.

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. I have read/studied avalanche awareness but have not taken an Avy 1 course. I plan on hiking solo unless I round someone up here. I would be limited to researching snowpack conditions, avalanche forecasts and avoiding obvious danger zones. How crazy would I be to go?

 

So, exploring the ski-touring routes seems logical. I'm guessing a guidebook would indicate ski-descents that are too steep for snowshoes? Is something like the Heather Ridge-Skyline Ridge at Stevens Pass something to consider. Thanks in advance for your time on this....

 

 

skyline would be good. pretty mellow and well traveled but that is something like a 3 hour trip if you go the usual route.

 

if you have done the summer hiking routes up dickerman or pilchuck, those would be good 2 day trip too.

 

Unfortunately, if you follow a ski tour guide, on some part of the tour you will be going on 30 degree slopes as that is the fun angle for skiing. that is also in the sweet zone for avi. I suppose good route finding would allow you to detour around those sections. Not evidence, but I feel like a snowshoe is more likely to trigger a slope than a skier. seems like more force applied to the slope. maybe I am wrong.

 

get some real avi training. watch videos of people getting trapped in for some reality check. I have been involved in two small avi incidents. I have also lost two acquaintances to the white death. those have put the real fear of the angry snow-god in me. this is nothing to take casually.

 

 

 

 

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Sounds like you have good Back Country skills. On Solo adventures, I use a PLB Satellite Beacon. :yoda:

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