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joelmccarty

Flatlander needs boot advice for early season

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I have read and re-read Dane's blog about a billion times but fact is I live so far away (Oklahoma) from the conditions I'm prepping for I could use some advice from those with more experience.

 

Currently own silver bullets and they worked great for me on south face of Baker in summer, and winter ice cragging in the Rockies and Sierras. Feet were never cold.

 

Mid may I am heading out to north ridge of Baker for AAI Alpine Ice course and hope to tackle Shuksan Fisher's Chimneys and Liberty ridge in near term in either early or late season conditions and plan to gear up next winter to start hitting winter trips in Colorado.

 

Question - can I make the trango extremes work for mid-may snow conditions on Baker if I double gaiter (pant's gaiter and external gaiter)?

 

Since I'm out a few days it seems like if I get them wet I'm hosed.

 

Question - same thing for Shuksan and Rainier in either early or late season and CO in winter (mostly one day for CO)?

 

If not should I look at a boot with integrated gaiter like Batura 2.0 (better chance of staying dry, but hosed if it gets wet) or go all the way to a light double aka Phantom 6000 (no plans for Denali or Aconcagua in near future but would love to migrate into BC).

 

I realize foot and crampon fit has to be taken into account but have a chance to go to a real boot fitter with a selection next weekend and want to understand if I can really get by with 2 sets of boots for all conditions. And if so - which one to add.

 

Thanks

 

 

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You'll be fine in those boots temp-wise. Treat them with Nikwax Fabric and Leather beforehand (recommended by Scarpa - works for me):

 

http://nikwax-usa.com/en-us/products/productdetail.php?productid=261

 

The Platypus plusBottles are flexy and hold boiling water. Take some extra fuel, heat em up, stuff em in your boots n socks to drive the moisture out. If its high and dry the air will help suck the moisture out.

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Those all sounds fine for spring or summer. Choose the boot that fits the best since all of those would have the features you need.

 

Also warm legs = warm feet. Just because you are on the less warm end of the boot insulation range doesn't mean your feet will automatically get cold.

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FWIW, I wear mountaineering boots (single, no liner) with all leather uppers, no insulation, usually no gaiters and have no problems temperature wise during typical early season conditions on most mountains in the North Cascades. I stay home during early season storms. I think many climbers prefer double boots on Rainier for early season though.

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Thanks guys

 

So it sounds like the Trango Extremes I already have should be fine warmth wise and no major concerns about staying wet.

 

Whats the major advantage of the integrated gaiter boots then? I'm sure warmth is one but I bet there even harder to dry once wet.

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Never had an integrated gaiter, but for me the disadvantage would certainly be sweat unless it is really cold. I have taken to going without gaiters during most trips now to let my feet breath. The bottom of my pants hug the uppers on my boots well and don't tend to let snow in anyway if I'm not post-holing in some deep.

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one word -- supergators. I use a version of the Trango year round in the Cascades, and supergators have been my solution for trips longer than overnight. I've never found any boot treatment to provide dependable waterproofing for longer than a couple of days of real wet. my supergators have kept boots and feet dry for month-long trips in Alaska and South America. When its warm, I scrunch the upper "leg" part of the gator down to my boot-top to keep from overheating.

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