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zub

Foot drop

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I've developed foot drop in my left foot as a result of a recurring herniated L3/4 disc.

 

The only place this has impacted my climbing is descending snow while facing out. As I can hardly hold the front of my foot up (i.e., can't stand on left heel), plunge stepping or descending existing steps makes my foot prone to simply rolling forward over the step. And you can guess what happens next.

 

I sought the advice of PT folks to see if there was an orthotic that I could carry and "throw on" as terrain dictates. A "foot-up brace" was suggested to me - an outside-the-boot device that kinda ties your shoelaces to your calf.

 

Like so:

 

9Hv14yw.jpg

 

Seems like it's worth a shot. However, if any of y'all have been down this road, I'd like to hear about it.

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An AFO (ankle-foot orthosis) may be helpful and wouldn't have that strap between top of foot and shin. That strap looks like it would be just asking for trouble on even a mildly brushy approach.

 

If you have foot drop, get thee to a physical medicine & rehab med specialist. Otherwise known as a physiatrist (not psychiatrist). There may well be some interventions that could help, including AFOs and compensatory training with a good neuro-MSK PT.

 

I work with patients who have neuro conditions. Not shilling for myself since I'm a generalist. There are a number of good specialists in the field, though. Hope you find something that helps.

 

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If you have foot drop, get thee to a physical medicine & rehab med specialist. Otherwise known as a physiatrist (not psychiatrist).

Thanks! Appointment = made.

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